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Full text of "Yesterday and to-day; a history"

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^—PP— "PW 



YESTEBDAY 



AND 



TO-DAY 



a History 



CHICAGO 

1905 



OUT OF THE DEPTHS 

No person who reads this little history will, from the reading 
thereof, be able to form any conception of the difficulties that have 
been encountered in getting together the data that forms the basis 
thereof. 

In the nearly sixty-nine years that have intervened since the first 
charter was granted by the Legislature of Illinois, more than one gener- 
ation of men has lived and passed away, and with them have gone 
most of the records of their words and deeds. 

Documents, that to them were trivial and valueless, but that would 
have been above price to the compiler of this history, were destroyed, 
lost, or so scattered that much time and minute search has been used in 
digging out a very small part of them from their almost absolute 
oblivion. Other documents passed out of existence when the roads 
they referred to had died, become bankrupt, were sold, consolidated, or 
otherwise vanished. Then came the great Chicago fire and wiped out a 
vast majority of the preserved, and till then supposed to be safe, public 
and private records and documents. 

To secure the official data required for this little history, the session 
journals of the legislatures of many of the Northwestern States, some 
dating back to 1835, had to be carefully examined and notes made 
therefrom. All of the special laws passed by the legislatures above 
named had also to be searched to find the special charters that it was 
the custom of the lawmakers in the early days of the Northwest to 
grant as authority for railroad building. 

Local histories, the files of newspapers, unburied prospectuses, records 
of public meetings and conventions were forced to give up each its 
share of history; and in addition to this, hundreds of letters were 
written to secure a date or a name or a fact that has been embodied in 
this story. 

So, taking up the whole question in its entirety and intricacy, one 
may safely say that this little history has cost more time and labor than 
would have been required to make a very fair and readable history of 
the United States for the last hundred years. 

Endeavor has been used to make the history a reliable record, and 
scrupulous regard for exact facts has been adhered to. 

As far as possible all the utterances are supported by documentary 
evidence. But even under these conditions it is reasonable to expect 
that errors and omissions will be found in these pages. It is the wish 
and hope of the compiler that when such are detected they will be 
reported to some officer of the North- Western Company by the discoverer. 

Chicago, III, April, 1905. THE COMPILER. 



Band, McNallv <3c cc 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Adoption of Name for Road 33 

Albany Bridge 27 

Beginning of the North-Western 37 

Branch Roads 14 

Bridge over Missouri River 30 

Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad 27 

Charters, Underlying 110 

Chicago & North-Western Proper 3-7 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad Divisions 6, 7 

Chicago Depots 23-24 

Chicago & St. Charles Air Line 16 

Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad 26 

Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad 36 

Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad 42 

Dates of Opening Galena Railroad 18 

Directors of Galena Company, Last Board 34 

Directors and Officers of Omaha Road 67 

Elgin & State Line Railroad 47 

Extinction of the Galena Company 32 

Fox River Valley Railroad 15, 21 

Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad 31 

Fuel 22 

Galena & Chicago Union Survey 7, 9, 10 

Granger Legislation 59, 71 

Great Consolidation 33 

Historical 3 

Hughitt, Marvin 48, 49, 62, 67, SS, 91, 95 

Illinois & Wisconsin Railroad 35 

Index 119-124 

Iowa Central Air Line 46 

Iowa Midland Company 47 

Keep, Albert 49, 67, 91, 92 

Kenosha & Beloit Railroad 38 

La Crosse, Trempealeau & Prescott Railroad 41 

Lists of Directors and Officers 89 

Lists of Stations 112 

Madison & Beloit Railroad 35 

Men Who Made the Road . , 89 

Milwaukee & North-Western Railroad 49 

Names of Engines 19 

Omaha Road, Early History 50 

Panic of 1837 8 

1857 17, 37 

1S73 58, 61 

1S93 76 

Paint, Plant and Making 85 

Peninsula Railroad 40 

Pension System 80 

Pioneer 12 

Purchase of Omaha Road 66 

Road after Consolidation 44 

Sheboygan & Fond du Lac Railroad 63 

Sioux City & Pacific Railroad 29 

Strap-rail Railroad 11 

Timber Preserving 88 

Track Elevation in Chicago 77 

Viaducts in Chicago 84 

Water Purifying 88 

West Wisconsin Railway 49 

Winona & St. Peter Railroad 40 

Winter of 1S80 and 18S1 65 



THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY AND 
THE NORTH-WESTERN SYSTEM 

WHAT IT IS-WHERE IT IS 



HISTORICAL 

Railroads do not build themselves. It may well be imagined that a 
railroad system that covers over 9,000 miles of main track; that has cost 
more than $335,000,000; that earns $65,000,000 per year; that furnishes 
work for nearly 40,000 employes and promptly and generously pays them 
in wages about $30,000,000 per year, and thus sustains at least 225,000 
souls, was not built in a day or without many trials, delays, and 
much vexation, worry, and care, and with vigilance that ceased not 
by day but extended through the nights as well. It is the history of 
such a railroad system we now write. 

It should be borne in mind that the charter of its oldest part was 
granted by the Legislature of Illinois in 1836, when railroads were nearly 
unknown and when the people of all the great West were but pioneers 
and were poor indeed. From such a people's foresight and enterprise 
has grown the great railroad system we will tell you about. 

It is well known this is one of the great railroad systems of the United 
States. The history of its beginning and growth is not so well known. 
It is to supply this lack of knowledge and to preserve the history of the 
work of the pioneers that this little book has been prepared. 

THE NORTH-WESTERN SYSTEM 

The system comprises nearly 10,000 miles of main line and some 
thousands of miles of sidings, etc., and is made up at this date (December 
31, 1904) as follows: 

I. THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY PROPER 

This railway is operated under divisions as follows: 

Miles. 

The Wisconsin Division 324 . 55 

Chicago to Fond du Lac Junction (via Milwaukee) 147.63 

Kenosha to Rockf ord 72 . 1 

Chicago to Janesville 91 . 93 

Mayfair to Central Street (Evanston) 7 . 69 

North 40th Avenue, Chicago, to Mayfair 5 . 20 

The Northern Wisconsin Division 332 . 72 

Janesville to Green Bay 150 . 27 

Appleton Extension (to Water Power) 3 . 63 

Sheboygan to Marshfield 164.09 

Red Granite Junction to Red Granite 7 . 85 

Nekoosa Junction to Nekoosa 6 . 88 

3 



4 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

Miles. 
The Galena Division 497.98 

Chicago to East Bank Mississippi River, opposite Clinton 137. 00 

Chicago to Freeport 121 . 00 

Elgin to Williams Bay 51 . 04 

St. Charles to Aurora 1 1 . 80 

Cortland to Sycamore 4 . 64 

Belvidere to Spring Valley 76.95 

Chicago South Branch Track, Junction to River 4.50 

Nelson to Peoria (including 2.02 miles of Peoria & Pekin Union 

■ Railway, leased) 85 . 00 

Churchill to Ladd (Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railroad, leased).. . 2.80 

Ladd to Seatonville (De Pue, Ladd & Eastern Railway, leased) . 3.25 

The Iowa Division 569 . 46 

East Bank of Mississippi River to Missouri River, opposite Omaha. 354 . 00 

Clinton to State Quarry, beyond Anamosa 73 . 57 

Stanwood to Tipton 8 . 50 

Des Moines to junction with Northern Iowa Division, near Jewell 

Junction 57 . 34 

Carroll to Harlan 41.11 

Junction near Manning to Audubon 17 . 00 

Cedar Rapids Cut-off 5.96 

Boone to Coal Banks 3 .25 

Broadway Station, Council Bluffs, to South Omaha (Union Pacific 

Railroad, leased) 8 . 73 

The Iowa and Minnesota Division 326 . 75 

Belle Plaine to Sanborn 241 .20 

Belle Plaine to Muchakinock 64 . 00 

Stark to end of track beyond Buxton 21 . 55 

The Northern Iowa Division 3S3 . 57 

Tama to Elmore 164 . 56 

Eagle Grove to Iowa State Line near Hawarden 145.20 

Jewell Junction to junction with Des Moines Line 1 . 75 

Burt to Fox Lake 45 . 66 

Eldora Junction to Alden 26 . 40 

The Sioux City Division 416.15 

Jewell Junction to Onawa 141 .53 

Maple River Junction to Carnarvon 13 . 00 

Wall Lake to Sargent's Bluff 99 . 87 

Wall Lake to Denison 24 . 80 

Boyer to Mondamin 61 . 30 

Missouri Valley to Sioux City ; 75 . 65 

The Madison Division 508 . 10 

Belvidere to Winona 225 . 83 

Evansville to Janesville . 15 . 6S 

Afton to Janesville 6.10 

Medary to La Crosse 3.96 

Trempealeau to Galesville 6.71 

Necedah Junction to Necedah 16.06 

Milwaukee to Montfort 140. S8 

Galena to Woodman 76 . 84 

Ipswich to Platteville 4 . 00 

Lancaster Junction to Lancaster 12.04 

The Ashland Division : S56 . 32 

Lake Shore Junction to Ashland (via Watersmeet) 386. 13 

Monico Junction to Hurley S8. 11 

Two Rivers Junction to Two Rivers 6.35 

Hortonville to Oshkosh 23 . 10 

Eland Junction to Marshfield 63 . 87 

Eland Junction to Rosholt 19 . 74 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 5 

Miles. 

North of Antigo to East Bryant Switch 7 . 27 

Pratt Junction to Harrison 1 7 . 85 

Parrish Junction to Parrisli 4 . 54 

Pelican to Crandon 1 7 . S4 

Watersmeet to Choate 22 . N2 

Interior Junction to Interior 1 . 61 

Craigsmere to Robbins 3 . 47 

Hurley to end of track 12.97 

Potato River Junction to end of track 2 . 60 

Extension through Section 34 1 . 34 

Branches and Extensions to Iron Mines 34.22 

Spurs to Industrial Establishments 21 .44 

Northern Junction to end of track beyond Laona 61 .03 

Clintonville to Oconto (St. Paul Eastern Grand Trunk Railway, 

leased) .* . 50. 00 

Spurs to Industrial Establishments on foregoing line (St. Paul 

Eastern Grand Trunk Railway, leased) 4 . 02 

The Peninsula Division 464 . 44 

Green Bay to Republic 202 . 64 

Clowry to Michigamme 10.44 

Wabik to Champion 1 . 23 

Powers to Watersmeet 104 . 33 

Stager to Amasa 24.10 

Narenta to Metropolitan 34. 86 

Branches and Extensions to Iron Mines S6 . 84 

The Minnesota Division 499 . 88 

Winona to Tracv (via St. Peter) 230. 50 

Tracy to Watertown 92 . 48 

Plainview Junction to Plainview 15 01 

Chatfield Junction to Chat field 11 . 46 

Rochester to Zumbrota 24 . 48 

Mankato Junction to New Ulm (via Mankato) 29 . 33 

Sleepy Eye to Redwood Falls 24 . 40 

Evan to Marshall 45.82 

Sanborn to Vesta 26.40 

The Dakota Division 802 . 53 

Tracy to Pierre 255 . 51 

Tyler to Astoria 32 . 20 

Sioux Valley Junction to Watertown 43 . 83 

James Valley Junction to Oakes 131 .95 

Watertown to Gettysburg 146.25 

Doland to Groton ' 38 . 84 

Iroquois to Hawarden 125 . 49 

Centerville to Yankton 28 . 46 

The Nebraska and Wyoming Division 1,429.32 

California Junction to Casper 631 . 69 

Arlington to Elkhorn Junction 27.76 

Irvington to South Omaha. 10. 36 

Fremont to Hastings 127 . 26 

Linwood to Kansas State Line beyond Superior 124. 14 

Platte River to Lincoln 45 . 1 1 

Junction near Scribner to Oakdale (via Albion) 113 .91 

Norfolk Junction to Bonesteel 123 . 44 

Dakota Junction to Deadwood 144 . 88 

Narrow Gauge Line above Deadwood, including branches to 

Mines 20.76 

Whitewood to Belle Fourche 21 . 19 

Buffalo Gap to Hot Springs 14.12 

Blair to Omaha (Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Rail- 
way, leased) 24 . 70 

Total miles of railroad operated June 30, 1904 7,411 . 77 



6 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

The foregoing mileage is located by States as follows: 

Miles. 

In Illinois. 685 . 02 

In Wisconsin 1,778 . 65 

In Michigan 521 . 19 

In Iowa 1,581 .24 

In Minnesota 650.30 

In South Dakota 948.36 

In North Dakota 14.28 

In Nebraska. 1,102 . 27 

In Wyoming 130. 46 

7,411.77 

The Company haa in operation December 31, 1904, in addition to 
the above, 843.46 miles of second, third, and fourth main track and 
2,592.97 miles of sidings and yard tracks, making a total mileage of all 
tracks, both owned and operated, of 10,848.20 miles. 

II. THE CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & OMAHA RAILWAY COMPANY 

Miles. 

The Wisconsin Division 702 . 49 

Elroy to Westminster Street 192 .82 

Westminster Street to St. Paul (leased) 1.30 

Westminster Street to Minneapolis (leased) 10. 10 

Hudson to Ellsworth 24.82 

Stillwater Junction to Stillwater 3.30 

St. Croix Drawbridge to Stillwater Switch 4 . 55 

Merrillan to Marshfield 38.67 

West Eau Claire to Shaw's Mill 2 . 74 

Menomonie Junction to Menomonie 3 . 01 

Fairchild to Mondovi 36 . 75 

Emerald to Weston 36 . 37 

North Wisconsin Junction to Bayfield 177.57 

Ashland Junction to Ashland 4 . 3S 

Ashland Shore Line 1.31 

Eau Claire to Spooner 81.51 

Superior Junction to Duluth (including Northern Pacific Railway 

Bridge, 1.59 miles) 73 .29 

Radisson to Winter 10 . 00 

The Minnesota and Iowa Division. 620 . 89 

St. Paul to LeMars 243.42 

LeMars to Sioux City (leased) 25.20 

Minneapolis to Merriam (leased) 27. 00 

Lake Crystal to Elmore 43 . 43 

Madelia to Fairmont. . 29 .3S 

Bingham Lake to Currie 38 . 63 

Heron Lake to Pipestone 55. 10 

Trent to Mitchell 130.73 

Luverne to Doon 28 . 00 

The Nebraska Division 277.81 

Missouri River to Omaha 123 . 06 

Sioux City Union Depot to Bridge Track (leased) .50 

Sioux City Bridge Company's Track 3.90 

Coburn to Newcastle 26 . 95 

Emerson to Norfolk 46 . 50 

Wakefield to Hartington 33 . 76 

Wayne to Bloomfield 43 . 14 

Total Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis iV- Omaha Railway proper 1,601 . 19 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 7 

ITS PROPRIETARY COMPANIES Miles. 

Chippewa Valley & North-Western Railway (Wisconsin Division), 

Radisson Junction to Radisson 36 . 00 

Eau Claire, Chippewa Falls & North-Eastern Railway (Wisconsin 

Division), Chippewa Falls to Yellow River 49 .28 

Total whole road, December 31, 1904 1,6S6 . 47 

THE HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN PROPER 

The present road is the outcome of a series of constructions, consolida- 
tions, mergers, purchases, and unions of railroads under various 
corporate names and during a long series of years. In writing this 
history we shall give a short account of the elements that formed what 
may be called the nuclei of the present corporation. 

By the date of its charter the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad is 
the parent "germ" from whence the great corporation may justly claim 
direct descent, and hence that corporation must have your first attention. 

THE GALENA & CHICAGO UNION RAILROAD 

In 1835 there was neither a mile of railroad built nor a corporation 
chartered to build a mile of railroad in Northern Illinois. Chicago then 
was but a little village on the shores of Lake Michigan, looking for its 
commercial prosperity to come by the way of boats on the lake and from 
the ultimate completion of a canal from the lake to the head of steamboat 
navigation of the Illinois River. 

As time has proved the building of this railroad to have really been 
the beginning of the building of that great aggregation of railroads that 
now forms the Chicago & North- Western Sj^stem, and as the history of 
that building presents many points of interest, not only to the railroad 
man, but to others as well, it has been thought best to give that history 
at some length and to give what would seem to be but trifling details. 
It should be remembered that when this road was constructed railroad 
building was in its veriest infancy, in the West, and was not much beyond 
the infantile stage anywhere in the United States. 

As some farseeing men believed they, Chicago, and the country west 
thereof, would be benefited by the building of a railroad westward from 
Chicago, application was made to the State Legislature, and on January 
10, 1836, the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad was incorporated by spe- 
cial charter by the Legislature of Illinois and authorized to build a railroad 
out into the prairie country and on towards, if not to, the Mississippi 
River, near the "lead mines at Galena, 111., and Dubuque, Iowa." 

This charter gave the following persons authority as Commissioners 
to receive subscriptions to the stock of the railroad: William Bennett, 
J. C. Goodhue, J. W. Turner, J. B. Thomas, Jr., Thomas Drummond, 
Peter Semple, and E. D. Taylor, and made the following its first Board of 
Directors: Theophilus W. Smith, Edmund D. Taylor, Josiah C. Goodhue, 
John T. Temple, Gregory Smith, Ebenezer Peck, and James H. Collins. 
Theophilus W. Smith was named its President. The charter provided 
for a railroad "from Galena in Jo Daviess County to the Town of Chicago " 
and fixed the capital stock at 8100,000. 

The charter provided, in Section 7, "If at any time after the passage 
of this act it shall be deemed advisable by the Directors of the said 



8 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

corporation to make and construct a good and permanent Turnpike 
Road upon any portion of the route of the Railroad * * * then said 
Directors are hereby authorized and empowered to construct a Turn/pike 
* * * and * * * erect * * * as many [toll] Gates as shall 
be deemed necessary thereon." It then named the prices that might 
be charged as toll at the gates named above. The tolls per mile per man 
and for horses, oxen, and other animals were named and their collection 
provided for. When sleighs were used the toll was to be but one-half the 
summer charge. Practically nothing was done under this charter. 

On March 4, 1837, however, the charter was amended by the Legisla- 
ture of Illinois and authority given to increase the capital stock of the 
corporation to $1,000,000, and then a preliminary survey, for a short 
distance west from Chicago, seems to have been made, and a consider- 
able body of land was secured on the east bank of the Des Plaines 
River, nine miles west of Lake Michigan. 

The financial "panic" beginning in the summer of 1837 put a stop to 
this and many other railroad projects, not only in Illinois, but all over 
the United States. The charter, however, was kept alive, Judge Theophi- 
lus W. Smith* being its President in 1S36 and to November 29, 1837, 
and Elijah K. Hubbard from 1837 to February 17, 1846, when Wm. B. 
Ogclenf was elected President and continued as such for many years. 
Substantially nothing more was done towards the construction of the 
road until 1847. 

In documents left to his son by Mr. Richard P. Morgan (of whom 
further mention will be made), Mr. John E. Blunt, one of the engineers 
who was employed in a very early day on the Galena road, and who is 
still employed as Consulting Engineer by the Chicago & North-Western 
Railway, found that in the summer of 1845 a convention, made up of 
delegates from all of the counties through which the proposed railroad 
was to pass, was held at Rockford, 111. There were sixteen delegates from 
Cook County (Chicago really), of which W. B. Ogden, B. W. Raymond, 
and John B. Turner were the leaders. Ihis convention, after lengthy 
and thorough discussion, decided the road should be built and the old 
Company should have new life put into it. 

On February 24, 1847, the charter was again amended by the Legisla- 
ture of Illinois and new life was put into the project by W. B. Ogden, 
John B. Turner, and a few others who had been induced to join in the 
venture. The charter and all of the property that was owned by the 
corporation were bought of Townsend (of New York City) and Mather 
(of Springfield, 111.), who, in some now unknown way, had become the 
owners of the charter and all of the property that belonged to the Com- 
pany, as well as of more than a majority of its capital stock. This pur- 
chase was to be paid for by the issue, to Townsend & Mather, of two 
hundred shares of the capital stock of the revived Company. One hun- 



* This Judge Smith was well known all over the State of Ill'nois and the northern United States 
on account of his connection with the attempt to make Illinois a slave State. Had this plan succeeded, 
the Galena road would not have been built. 

t In August. 1833, Charles Futler. of New York, came to Chicago and, with Arthur Bronson, selected 
182 acres of land on the north side of the Chicago River, "Block i of the original town " being a portion. 
This block will be heard of many years after this selection. In 1835 the whole of this selection became 
the property of Mr. Butler by purchase from Mr. Bronson for $100,000. W. B. Ogden was a brother- 
in-law of Mr. Butler, who induced him to come to Chicago and subdivide and look after the sale of this 
•• acreage." In this way Mr. Ogden became identified with the West, and out of this grew his interest 
in the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 9 

clred shares were given when the bargain was made and the other hundred 
were to be delivered when the road should reach the Fox River. 

In one of the later reports of the Company is a statement to the effect 
that 1,875 shares of the original stock had been bought by the then 
active Company for $1,875, or 1 per cent of its face value. This is sup- 
posed to be the minority of the stock that was not owned by Townsend 
& Mather at the time they sold the charter and other properties to the 
reorganized Company. 

The only property that had any real value that was obtained from 
Townsend & Mather was the 940 acres of timbered land on the Des 
Plaines River that is referred to above. This land was thought to be a 
great acquisition, as it would furnish ties and timber for the beginning of 
the road building and for fuel for its locomotive engines for many years. 
These things it did. In those days wood alone was the only fuel that 
was used on any locomotive engine in the West. 

The outcome of the foresight, energy, and perseverance, under appar- 
ently insurmountable difficulties connected with the building of this 
road, warrants the preservation, in this history, of the names of the men 
who, as directors, gave the new and lasting impetus to the project that 
finally was consummated in the completion of the road from Chicago to 
Freeport and from Turner Junction to the Mississippi River. They 
were as follows: John B. Turner of Chicago, W. B. Ogden of Chicago, 
Walter L. Newberry of Chicago, Charles Walker of Chicago, James H. 
Collins of Chicago, W. H. Brown of Chicago, Benj. W. Raymond of Chi- 
cago, J. Young Scammon of Chicago, Thomas Dyer of Chicago, C. D. 
Hempstead of Galena, 111., Thomas Drummond of Galena, 111., W. H. 
Davis of Au Sable Grove, 111., and Allen Robins of New York. They 
formed the directory that began the actual construction of the road. 
W. B. Ogden was elected President; Francis Howe, Secretary and 
Treasurer, and John B. Turner, Acting Director, he having especial 
authority in all matters of construction. 

Stock books, for subscriptions to the capital stock of the Company, 
were opened on August 10, 1847, at Chicago and at various points along 
the line of the projected road, and soon the Directors announced that 
the road had 1,200 stockholders. From the "Prospectus" issued by the 
Directors we learn it was their desire to make this road "a part of the 
great line of railroad between the Atlantic and the Mississippi." 

The real survey for the railroad was begun by Richard P. Morgan 
(late engineer on the Hudson River Railroad, as engineer in charge at a 
salary of $2.50 per day!) in September, 1847, near Chieago, "on the half 
section line corresponding with the center of Kinzie Street, on which 
course it continues for thirteen miles, crossing the Des Plaines River a 
little south of the St. Charles road." This "St. Charles road" was 
"the stage road" from Chicago to Galena, 111., and the eastern portion 
of it was also "the stage road" from Chicago for Dixon and Rock Island, 
and on it Frink & Walker ran stages for many years and until they 
were forced off by the completion of "The Galena" and other railroads. 

A certain route was favored in this prospectus "as its grade would be 
most favorable eastward, ".. and Mr. Morgan, the engineer, said he thought 
this very important. He says, "as experience has shown that the traffic 
eastward will be three to one greater than that to be transported west- 



10 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

ward." The "experience" of the last forty years shows this guess to 
have been very wide of the mark, as the traffic east and west bound 
have been very nearly equal. 

By the route advocated, the distance from Chicago to Galena was 
182 miles, and "the total estimated cost" was $2,648,727, or $14,553 
per mile, and this included cost of "fencing, engines, and cars." 

Mr. Morgan gave the probable earnings for the first year of the road, 
when finished, as "about $393,000; of this, $35,000 will come from 
lead from the lead mines, $100,000 from wheat, $12,000 from lumber, 
and $180,000 from passengers and mails." From the freight earnings he 
estimated $166,000 would come from that carried eastward and only 
$47,000 from that carried westward. He thought 50,000 passengers, at 
an average fare of $3 each, would "equal all of the travel from every 
source," as there were but 200,000 people "in all the country to be 
traversed, or who could use the road when built." 

To show the profits that might be expected to come to the owners of 
the property, Mr. Morgan estimated the net that could be divided among 
them would equal 8 per cent on the capital invested. Mr. Morgan also 
'advocated the building of the road eastward from Chicago (as its charter 
allowed it to do) to connect with the Michigan Central Railroad, which 
was then being built and that was planned to come no farther west than 
New Buffalo, on the State line between Michigan and Indiana, and urged 
that "it will cost no more than $328,000." 

When surveying the line for the road west of Chicago, Mr. Morgan 
also surveyed the line for the road from Chicago eastward to New Buffalo, 
and urged the Galena Company to build its road eastward to that point, 
where it was expected the Michigan Central Railroad would soon be 
built and terminate. Under the original plan all of the business of the 
Michigan Central road was to be transported by steamers across Lake 
Michigan. This plan, in fact, was carried out for a long time, and not 
until many years after did the Michigan road build into Chicago. 

Mr. Morgan gave all the details as to the cost of building from 
Chicago to New Buffalo, and summed up his report by saying that by 
this means the Galena Company could carry passengers from Chicago 
to New Buffalo in two hours, and from thence the Michigan Central 
road could take them to Detroit in another eight hours. That this 
suggestion for a connection with the Michigan Central Railroad at New 
Buffalo, Ind., did not die, is proved by the fact that in his report to the 
stockholders Wm. B. Ogden, the President, on April 5, 1848, stated that: 

"It can not have escaped the observation of all acquainted with the region of country 
to be affected by the construction of this important work that, if constructed now and 
extended east from Chicago around the head of Lake Michigan till it meets the Michigan 
Central Railroad, as it soon will, it secures to the country through which it passes ttie 
great North-Western railroad thoroughfare for all time to come." [The italics are in the 
original report. 

Here we have what is believed to have been the first mention of what 
is practically the present corporate name of the railroad we are now 
describing. Bear in mind this was written in 1S4S, and long before there 
was any corporation bearing this title. 

The survey progressed so rapidly that the first seven miles west of 
Chicago were put under contract in the fall of 1847. The next section, 
thirty-one niiles westward, was ready for contract by March 1, 1848. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 1 1 

Some of the first land secured for the right of way was from a farm 
belonging to Warren L. Wheaton, near the present Wheaton station 
(now a thriving city and the county seat of Du Page County), which was 
named for Mr. Wheaton. In his deed to the company for this right of 
way was a provision to the effect that no depot or station should ever be 
built on the property conveyed. This provision cost the old man (who 
is still living) a fortune, as it prevented him from making the profit that 
others made by laying out adjacent to his farm a town site and selling 
the lots thereon. 

A STRAP-RAIL RAILROAD 

As to strap rails, the president in his report said : 

"Extraordinary and ruinous financial difficulties of Great Britain * * * served 
to tighten the money market of this country * * * so as to prevent the company 
from getting iron and engines east or to purchase edge-rail for their road, and that 
hence it has been decided that strap rail (flat or plate rail) would have to be used." 

For a strap-rail railroad from Chicago to Elgin (forty-two miles), 
the chief engineer estimated the cost would be about $8,500 per mile. 
This apparently proves that the original Morgan estimate was based on 
the use of the T rail. 

Doubtless very few of the present generation know what a strap-rail 
railroad was, and fewer ever saw one. For those we copy a very clear 
description of such a track from a report made on April 5, 1848, to the 
directors of the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad by John Van Nort- 
wick, its chief engineer. He says: 

"The superstructure [that is what we now call the track] of the road upon which 
the present estimate is based is composed of cross-ties nine feet long and six inches 
thick, which are to be laid thirty inches from center to center; on these are to be placed 
longitudinal rails of Norway, or yellow, pine, a portion six inches square and a portion 
seven inches square, secured in place by triangular blocks or knees of scantling, firmly 
spiked to the ties on each side. Upon the longitudinal rails is an oak ribbon one and 
a quarter by three inches square, and on this ribbon an iron plate rail two and a half 
by three-fourths or seven-eighths inches, and weighing about thirty tons to the mile." 

In the second annual report, which was dated March 5, 1849, Mr. 
W. B. Ogden, the president, notifies the stockholders that the road was 
finished on December 15, 1848, "to near the Des Plaines River, ten 
miles" west of Chicago. Up to this time the total subscription to the 
capital stock since August, 1847, amounted to only $365,000, of which 
only $106,041 had been paid to the company. In this fiscal year, viz.: 
on May 5, 1848, the first issue of bonds was authorized by the stock- 
holders, and was to be no more than $150,000 of face value. The strap 
rails that were used cost $50 per ton on board the boat at Buffalo, N. Y., 
were bought on credit and were to be paid for in two and one-half 
years. In this year also was purchased the first locomotive engine. It 
was called "The Pioneer." This engine, and another that was con- 
tracted for at the same time, were to be paid for, the first with the stock 
of the railroad, and the last with half stock and half money. This led 
the president to say that this purchase showed "the firm and increasing 
confidence of the public and of experienced business men and capitalists 
in the proper management and profitable character of our undertaking." 



12 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF " THE PIONEER " 

"The Pioneer" was the name of the first locomotive engine that ran 
on any railroad west of Chicago, and was the first that was bought by 
the Galena company. Because of these facts it deserves this mention. 
The first reference to this engine that we find in the records of the com- 
pany is in the second annual report that was dated March 5, 1849, in 
which, after fully relating other purchases, the president notices "the 
purchase of one locomotive engine, for which the full-paid stock of the 
company was given in exchange." The same year John Van Nortwick, 
the chief engineer, in his report to the president, says: "The company 
have on hand one second-hand locomotive, which is in good order and 
will answer all purposes connected with the construction of this [the 
first] division and its repairs after it is in operation." This locomotive 
engine was named "The Pioneer." (All engines in those days were 
given names as we now name steamers.) It was built by the Baldwin 
Locomotive Works, M. W. Baldwin, proprietor, in Philadelphia, Pa.; 
had cylinders ten inches in diameter and an eighteen-inch stroke; it had 
but one pair of "driving wheels" of four and one-half feet diameter, and 
weighed only ten tons. It was placed on the road on October 24, 1848. 
After many years' use it was retired from service and can now be seen in 
the Field Museum, in Chicago, where it was placed by the Chicago & 
North-Western Company for exhibition and safe keeping. It was shown 
at the World's Fair in Chicago, in 1893, and at St. Louis, in 1904. John 
Ebbert was appointed engineer to take charge of and run this engine, 
and did so for many years. He had the satisfaction of exhibiting the 
engine at the World's Fair in Chicago, and there told its story many 
thousand times. Mr. Ebbert died in Chicago on August 22, 1899, in his 
eighty-sixth year. 

The first division of the Galena road was laid with strap rails. In 
after years when the strap rail was to be abandoned and T rail used, not 
a man could be found in Illinois who knew how to lay the new rail, and, 
consequently, Mr. Turner, the president, sent to New York State and 
"borrowed," of the Syracuse & Utica Railroad, Jenks D. Perkins, who 
came west, made the tools for laying T rails, laid the rails to Freeport, 
111., and worked for the company and its successors from that time until 
quite recently. He is still alive and resides in Chicago. 

On March 1, 1848, a contract was made for building that portion of 
the road that was "to begin seven miles west of Chicago, as the east 
seven miles were let last fall." 

John Wan Nortwick, the chief engineer, in a report dated April 5, 
1848, urges that flat strap rails shall be used on that part of the road 
and gives as the principal reason therefor that "the eastern railroads 
were abandoning the use of the strap rail, ami hence would sell them and 
the locomotive engines adapted thereto very cheap, as the last could not 
be used on roads laid with T rails." 

In the first regular annual report, which was for the year ending April 
5, 184S, the president advises the stockholders that he had completed the 
purchase of the charter, a majority of the capital stock, and all o\' the 
property of the corporation from Townsend & Mather, and said : "This 
arrangement places the stock and charter entirely in the hands of your 
directors and secures to the company about 1,000 acres of land.*' 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 13 

The resident engineer, in his report for this year, said: 
"Three branch roads were chartered this year to connect with the Galena company's 
lines, viz.: One from St. Charles and another from Aurora, both in Illinois, and the 
third is the Madison & Beloit Railroad, in the valley of the Rock River, in Wisconsin, 
presenting perhaps the most important and profitable connection to be made to the 
main line of the Galena & Chicago road." 

Under a charter that was granted by the Illinois Legislature on 
January 31, 1849, one of the above named roads was called The St. 
Charles Branch Railroad Company. The commissioners who were 
authorized to secure subscriptions for its capital stock were Ira Minard, 
Bela T. Hunt, Levi Brown, Charles K. Parks, and George G. Stevens. 
These roads were not chartered, projected, nor owned by the Galena 
company at this time, but were independent in every respect of the 
Galena company. 

The Michigan Central was to be finished to New Buffalo, Inch, in 
April, 1849. and "two daily lines of steamers are then to run between 
Chicago and that point, a distance of forty-five miles," and this would 
allow passengers "to go from Chicago to New York and to Boston in 
two and one-half days." 

The chief engineer, who seems also to have been the general manager or 
general superintendent of those days, reports to the president, in March, 
1849, that an engine house and shop had been built on the company's 
lot "on the north branch of the Chicago River" in Chicago, and that 
"this building is supplied with water by an aqueduct extending to the 
river." He also gave a list of the road's equipment as "six four-wheeled 
and six eight-wheeled platform freight cars, three four-wheeled and 
four eight-wheeled covered freight cars, two hand and four small gravel 
ears, and one second-hand locomotive." (This was "The Pioneer," of 
which mention has already been made.) Here is a total of twenty-five 
cars, of all sorts ; and but one locomotive engine with which to continue 
the construction of the road and to transport all of its traffic. To-day 
the Chicago & North-Western, the direct descendant of this pioneer road, 
requires and owns and uses 52,807 cars and 1,307 locomotive engines! 

The chief engineer also said: 

"Cars [he meant trains, of course] have been run for the conveyance of freight 
and passengers for most of the time during the past winter from Chicago * * * 
to the Des Plaines River. One trip will be continued to be made each day for that 
purpose * * * to such point as the track shall be laid, provided it shall not too 
much interfere with its construction." 

In spite of the most adverse circumstances, and in the nearly total 
absence of money in the West, the road was completed and opened on 
January 22, 1850, to Elgin, forty-two and one-half miles from Chicago, 
at a total cost of $405,382.36. The road had already become so suc- 
cessful that its stockholders were paid a 10 per cent dividend out of 
earnings of the fiscal year that ended in June, 1850. 

In 1850 the company built in Chicago a freight house 50 x 150 feet 
which the chief engineer declared to be large enough for all of the freight 
purposes of the road, as well as for general offices of the company! An 
engine house, smith shop 30 x 60 feet, with an "addition" IS x 60 feet, 
and car shop 26 x 90 feet, together with a "wharf" in front of the com- 
pany's land on the north branch of the Chicago River, were also built 
this year. 



14 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

In giving the list of the equipment owned by the road, the chief 
engineer speaks of the "13 double covered freight cars equal to 26 single," 
and then of "3 single ditto." One can only guess, no one now knows, 
what this meant, though then it was doubtless well understood by all 
railroad people. Ground for a depot in Chicago was also bought this 
year, at a cost of $13,391. 

"The St. Charles Branch road " that was mentioned on a previous page 
was completed and formed a junction with the Galena road at a point 
thirty-three miles west of Chicago. This railroad long since passed 
out of existence, and its track and everything that was connected with 
it have been obliterated. The present "St. Charles & Geneva" railroad 
is a creation of a much later date, and bears no relationship to the 
original "St. Charles Branch" road. 

In the third annual report of the president, under date of June 5, 

1850, the stockholders were told the total gross earnings of the road for 
the last eleven months of the just past fiscal year had been no more than 
$48,331, but of that the net was $29,812, The total number of passen- 
gers carried on all parts of the road from June 1, 1849, to May 1, 1850, 
was 37,524, or about the number now daily brought into the North- 
western Railway Depot in Chicago. Wood still was the only fuel 
used in the engines of the road, and its average cost was $2.13 per 
cord. The total face value of the capital stock that was in the hands 
of the public amounted to $261,339, and the face value of the bonds that 
had been sold was $136,970. 

From the fourth annual report, dated June 4, 1851, we learn another 
"block" (block No. 1 of the original town of Chicago) was bought at 
a cost of $60,513, for "depot purposes," and a drawbridge over the north 
branch of the Chicago River was arranged for. This "block" was a por- 
tion of the purchase made by Charles Butler, of which mention was 
made on a preceding page, and on it two of the present company's freight 
houses stand at this time. 

The "Aurora Branch road" was completed from "The Junction" 
(thirty miles west of Chicago) to Aurora, thirteen miles, and opened for 
traffic on November 1, 1850. John B. Turner was elected president of 
the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad on January 5, 1851. 

In May, 1852, Mr. Turner proposed to the stockholders that he should 
be permitted to substitute T rails for the "flat" or "strap" rails that 
were in use between Chicago and Elgin. The needed authority was 
granted, and in due course of time the "strap" rails disappeared from 
the road. The road was extended westward, and on September 15, 

1851, was operated from Chicago to Huntley, twelve miles west of Elgin. 
The next westerly twelve miles were opened on October 18, 1851; the 
next twelve miles, which took the road to Belvidere, were opened on 
December 3, 1851, and the last six miles of what was called "the Second 
Division" was finished and opened to Cherry Valley on March 10, 1852. 

In those days it was thought to be a wonderful feat to build a 
railroad and lay its tracks in the depth of winter, and much praise 
was given by the president to the superintendent of the track-laying, 
Jenks D. Perkins, for having achieved the difficult task of finishing 
the road as he had done. The company now had seventy-eight miles 
of road built and in operation. This year a drawbridge was built across 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 15 

the north branch of the Chicago River, and tracks laid to the ground 
that had been purchased for "depot purposes" on the north side of the 
main river. 

A freight house of stone and brick was built on the "block 1" of 
which earlier mention has been made. This house faced west on what 
is now Dearborn Avenue, and lay south of Kinzie Street. This should 
be remembered, as reference will be made to it when we come to speak 
of the passenger depots in Chicago. 

During the sixth fiscal year a survey was made for a railroad, or 
"branch," as it was called, from the "Junction" west to connect with 
"the Rockford & Rock Island road" (which was one of many projected 
but never built railroads of that day), and contracts were let for its 
building. It should be remembered this "branch" was the beginning of 
what is now the main line of the North- Western Railway from West 
Chicago (then Turner "Junction") to the Missouri River. The annual 
report for this year speaks of the building of a road under the name of the 
Mississippi Junction Railroad, from Dixon, 111., to Fulton on the Mis- 
sissippi River, and a suggestion is made as to "the probability of there 
being railroads built west of that river.'* These doubtless were but 
prophetic hints of the present line of the North-Western Railway in 
Iowa and beyond the Missouri River. 

This year's report also tells of the building of a railroad up the valley 
of the Fox River (of Illinois) from Elgin thirty-two miles to the Illinois- 
Wisconsin State line. The corporate name of the road was the Fox 
River Valley Railroad, and it was stated the road was under contract 
and would be completed in about one year. This road was not projected 
nor begun by the Galena company. It will, however, be seen that it 
finally fell into the hands of that corporation, and was extended by 
it and finally finished by the Chicago & North-Western company. 

The main line of the Galena road was finished and opened for business 
to Freeport, 120 miles from Chicago, on September 1, 1853. The Beloit 
branch was opened from Belvidere to Beloit on November 14, 1853, and 
"forty-five miles of the Dixon & Iowa Central Route" (as the Mississippi 
& Rock River Junction Railroad was then popularly called) were 
expected to be opened in May, 1854. This road was leased by the 
Galena company and consolidated with it January 1, 1855, and finally 
became a portion of the main railroad from Chicago to the Mississippi 
River. That part of the Illinois Central Railroad that runs from Free- 
port north was finished this year to Warren, twenty-five miles, and was 
"operated by the Galena company." 

DUBUQUE & MINNESOTA RAILROAD 

"We notice that the President of the United States lias withdrawn from sale all 
the public lands on the great route from Dubuque via St. Paul to Lake Superior. The 
road strikes the lake at the mouth of Left Hand River in Wisconsin. Thus we see 
lands withdrawn in Iowa, in Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The grant of land by act 
of Congress could not go to any company then organized. Since that time, however, 
the company, then unorganized, has organized and paid in the necessary amount to 
secure the grant, and has already taken the preliminary steps to survey the line, and, 
before three years expire, cars will leave the depot of the Chicago & Galena Railroad 
Company for Lake Superior, making the trip in twenty-four hours. In view of the 
fact, we learn that one of the most eminent engineers in America is examining the 
Mississippi just below Dubuque and Dunlieth with reference to a plan and site for a 
bridge." 



16 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

We clip the foregoing from the Chicago Democrat of July 25, 1854, as 
it relates to a railroad project that was by its backers intended to carry 
the Galena road to Lake Superior and possibly to the Pacific Ocean. 
As will be seen later on, nothing substantial came out of the project. 

In the annual report for the eighth year, dated January 5, 1855, we 
are told the company had in operation 212 miles of road and that sixty- 
eight miles of "the Dixon Air Line" were opened and are included in the 
above mileage. The Beloit & Madison Railroad (not yet owned by the 
Galena company) was opened this year between Beloit and Footville, 
Wis. This railroad was ultimately purchased by the Galena company. 

On June 4, 1856, the president reported to the stockholders that they 
operated 2594 miles of road and that the "Chicago, St. Charles & Mis- 
sissippi Air Line road," running from the south branch of the Chicago 
River to Oak Ridge (now Oak Park) 10J miles, had been purchased and 
paid for in bonds of the Galena company that drew 7+ per cent interest. 
This little road was the beginning of a project that was intended to 
parallel the Galena road to "The Junction" and then extend directly 
westward to the Mississippi River. " It would if built take away much 
of the value of the Galena company." 

CHICAGO & ST. CHARLES AIR LINE RAILROAD 

In The American Railway Times of February 2, 1854, we find the 
following about this project: 

"The Galena Jeffersonian announces that an alteration has been made in the line 
of this road by which $300,000 to $400,000 will be saved in the construction. We 
suppose this is effected by a deviation from an air line where formidable obstructions 
oppose. An air line is very desirable, but not always most judicious. The same paper 
also says that a meeting of the directors of the company was held at Mount Carroll 
on last Saturday, and that the affairs of the company are progressing satisfactorily. 
An early letting of the whole line is expected. The people of Carroll County were, 
yesterday, to vote on the question of taking stock in the road, and a vote for the same 
purpose is soon to be held in Ogle County. The work on this road has not been pushed 
forward with as much vigor as we had reason to expect when the stock subscription 
books were closed, but we make all allowance for this in the fact that its directors have 
not been alone in falling behind their calculations. It is much easier to demonstrate 
on paper the time required to build a railroad than it is to demonstrate it practically. 
The Chicago, St. Charles & Mississippi Air Line road had a subscription of the most 
reliable character in this city, which, with the amount subscribed along the line, and by 
Eastern capitalists, swelled the whole subscription up to $1,250,000. There was a 
mistake in making a condition of the subscription that it should be collected at the 
rate of only 25 per cent per annum, but this doubtless was done on the supposition of 
a continued easy money market and an ability to negotiate a loan predicated on a 
subscription of so reliable a character. Still, we hope the directory will make strenuous 
exertions, and as soon as spring opens push the work forward rapidly. The Iowa 
Central road will be finished some distance this year, and will be a great feeder to the 
Chicago & St. Charles road, as soon as the latter shall be finished to Savannah." 

The purchase by the Galena road put a stop to this whole scheme. 

This year a telegraph line was built alongside the road between Chi- 
cago and Frceport and the trains operated by it. It is believed this was 
the first Western railroad that operated its trains by telegraph. In this 
year a most important experiment was tried on this road, viz., the burning 
of "soft" (bituminous) coal in place of wood, and two locomotives were 
purchased for the trial. These engines were not to be paid for unless 
they were "successful with Illinois soft coal." Previous to this date 
wood alone was used on all engines on the road. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 17 

A. W. Adams appears in this report as the first general freight agent, 
and Charles Wade as the first general ticket agent. Heretofore all the 
departments of the road seem to have been managed under the name of 
the president or the chief engineer. 

President Turner reports the company as having 259^ miles of finished 
road costing, to date, $8,293,294.62, and having a bonded debt of $2,958,- 
015.28. He also says, "the original plans of the work have now all been 
carried out except the completion of the second track." He then con- 
gratulates everybody accordingly! The president in his report said the 
gross earnings for the year were $2,800,053, and the prospects for the 
future very great. 

The road's telegraph line was extended from Turner Junction to the 
Mississippi River, and the president explains to the stockholders how 
important it was to have a telegraph line along the road. This appar- 
ently was to satisfy them that their money had been wisely spent. 

This year the stockholders were told of the projection under the name 
of the "Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad" of a line of road from 
Clinton, Iowa, westward. It was to run from the Mississippi River to 
an unnamed point in Iowa and thence north "to connect with a road 
extending northwesterly to St. Paul " and that the road had been built 
from "Clinton to De Witt, a distance of twenty miles, and is now ready 
to be opened." In this report the stockholders were also told that 
other roads were projected from the Mississippi River and other points, 
tributary to the Galena company's lines, and were warned that more 
money would soon be needed to construct lines that must be built to 
protect from competition the company's interests. This report also said 
the city of Chicago had adopted plans to raise the grade of its streets, in 
the north and west divisions of the city, about 2\ feet and that this would 
force the Galena company to fill in and raise about sixteen acres of land 
it occupied for tracks, yards, and depots. "To make this elevation, soil 
would have to be hauled in from Babcock's Grove [now Lombard], 
twenty miles." 

The road now had fifty-six locomotive engines and 1,200 cars of vari- 
ous sorts. W. A. Thrall appears as general ticket agent (he held this 
position from 1856 until he left the road to join the official force of the 
Illinois Central Railroad. Many years after he became general ticket 
agent of the Chicago & North-Western and held the office for many 
years), and makes an elaborate report showing that in the year past the 
road had carried 613,000 passengers. This number was less than 3 per 
cent of the number that are now carried yearly by its successor, The 
Chicago & North-Western Railway Company. This year the fiscal year 
of the company was changed to be uniform with the calendar year. The 
annual report for the eleventh year is dated January 23, 1858, and is for 
the year ending December 31, 1S57. 

The financial panic of 1857 not only put a stop to railroad building, 
but also put a stop to dividend-paying and very seriously crippled this 
and all other Western railroads. The Galena road had to discharge many 
of its employes, and thus reduced its working force from 1,904 in August, 
1857, to no more than 722 in the January following. Passenger and 
freight earnings fell off about 25 per cent, and every kind of business all 
over the West came to a standstill, and bankruptcy became the rule and 



18 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

not the exception. This year "The Junction " station, thirty miles west 
of Chicago, was named "Turner" by the people of that place, in honor of 
the president of this road. 

In reporting on the cost of construction, the president explains he had 
been obliged to sell some bonds at a discount, and adds this curious note: 

"The discount on the bonds is simply the amount of interest to be paid, over and 
above the rate stated, which interest (represented by the discount) is embraced in the 
face of the bonds, and will be paid at their maturity instead of semi-annually." 

DATES OF OPENING, ETC. 

The report also said : 

" It may be interesting to refer to the dates of the opening for business of your 
road, to the various points on its line, up to the time of the final completion. I there- 
fore subjoin such a statement: 

MAIN LINE 

The road was opened to Elgin, forty-two miles from Chicago, January 22, 1850. 
This portion of the road was originally' laid with strap-rail iron, resting upon longi- 
tudinal stringers, but during 1852-53 this track was replaced with T-rail iron. 

Opened to Huntley, 55 miles from Chicago, September 15, 1851 
Opened to Marengo, 66 miles from Chicago, October 18, 1851. 
Opened to Belvidere, 78 miles from Chicago, December 3, 1851. 
Opened to Cherry Valley, 84 miles from Chicago, March 10, 1852. 
Opened to Rockford, 92 miles from Chicago, August 2, 1852. 
Opened to Freeport, 121 miles from Chicago, September 1, 1853. 
Opened to Beloit, 21 miles from Belvidere, November 14, 1853. 

CHICAGO, FULTON & IOWA LINE 

Opened to Lane, 45 miles from Junction, January 10, 1854. 
Opened to Dixon, 68 miles from Junction, December 4, 1854. 
Opened to Sterling, 80 miles from Junction, July 22, 1855. 
Opened to Morrison, 94 miles from Junction, September 23, 1855. 
Opened to Fulton, 105i miles from Junction, December 16, 1855. 

SECOND TRACK 

Opened to city limits, 2 miles from Chicago, September 1, 1855. 
Opened to Harlem, 9 miles from Chicago, December 15, 1855. 
Opened to Cottage Hill, 17 miles from Chicago, October 19, 1856. 
Opened to Babcock's Grove, 20 miles from Chicago, June 7, 1857. 
Opened from Danby to Wheaton, 2\ miles, June 7, 1857. 
Opened from Wheaton to Winfield, 2h miles, November 1, 1857. 
Opened to Junction, 30 miles from Chicago, December 6, 1857. 

ST. CHARLES AIR LINE BRANCH * 

Opened from South Branch Station to Harlem, \Q\ miles, January 1, 1856. 

The general average of the number of miles of T-rail track in use in the main track, 
from September 15, 1851, to May 1, 1852, seven and one-half months, was 31 J miles, 
equal to 19£ miles for one year. 

General average from May 1, 1852, to May 1, 1853, 48 miles. 

General average from May 1, 1853, to May 1, 1854, 131 miles. 

General average from May 1, 1854, to May 1, 1S55, 196J miles. 

General average from May 1, 1S55, to May 1, 1S56, 240 miles. 

General average from May 1, 1856, to May 1, 1857, 272 J miles. 

General average from May 1, 1S57, to January 1, 1858, 282} miles. 
Equal to 188 1 for one year. 

♦This is the little road that was bought in 1855-56. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



19 



259 \ miles 
30 miles 
42 f miles 

332| miles 



The total length of track in use January 1, 1858, is as follows: 

Main line, from Chicago to Freeport 121 miles 

Beloit Branch, from Belvidere to Beloit 21 miles 

East Elgin Branch 1 \ miles 

Chicago, Fulton & Iowa line, from Junction to Fulton 105f miles 

St. Charles Air Line, from Chicago to Harlem lOi miles 

Second track 

Sidings and gravel pit tracks 

REAL ESTATE 

The company owns real estate as follows: 

Right of way , 3,300 acres 

Land at and near Harlem Station, nine miles west of Chicago 940 acres 

DEPOT GROUNDS 

Main line and Beloit Branch, including 62 acres in Chicago. . . . 165 acres 

Chicago, Fulton & Iowa line 116 acres 

281 acres 

Gravel pits - 68 acres 

Miscellaneous lands 3,491 acres 

Total real estate 8,080 acres 

Of the land described in this statement as miscellaneous, a large portion was bought 
on account of the wood growing thereon. When the wood is removed the land is resold 
by the company. These lands are scattered along the line of the railroad, and gener- 
ally contiguous thereto. The company owns about 1,200 acres (included in the above 
list) located on densely wooded islands in the Mississippi River, a few miles above 
Fulton." 

NAMES OF THE LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES 

In those days all locomotives were named. We give a list of the 
sixty engines of the company owned at the end of this year, with their 
names and history: 



Name of 
Engine 

Pioneer. . . 
Chicago... 

Elgin 

Illinois. . . 
Belvidere. 
Rockford. 
J. B. Turner 

Marengo .... 
Minnesota. . . 

Iowa 

Kishwaukie. 
Shawbeney , 
Waubansee., 
Winnebago. 

Ariel 

Cloud 

Du Page. . . . 
W'gThunder 
DeKalb... 
Des Plaines 
Kehotaw. . 



Name of Manufacturer 



Baldwin, Philadelphia, rebuilt 

Norris & Bros., Philadelphia, rebuilt 

Norris & Bros., Philadelphia, rebuilt 

Norris & Bros., Philadelphia, rebuilt 

Norris & Bros., Philadelphia 

Norris & Bros., Philadelphia 

Rebuilt from Whittlesey by Galena & Chi- 
cago Union Railroad 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Norris & Bros 

Norris & Bros 

Norris & Bros 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Norris & Bros 

Exchanged with Chicago & Aurora rail- 
road for Whitlesey 

Lowell Machine Shop , 

Lowell Machine Shop 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor, Paterson. . 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor, Paterson . . 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 



When Put on 
Track 



October 24, 1848 
July 17, 1849 

November 6, 1849 
October 17, 1851 
November 6, 1851 
November 2, 1851 

January 1853 

August 11, 1852 
September 19, 1852 
September 21, 1852 
September 27, 1852 
October 29, 1852 
November 15, 1852 



June 

June 

July 

August 

August 



27, 1853 
28, 1853 
29, 1853 
18, 1853 
25, 1853 



September 13, 1853 
September 24, 1853 



Weight 
in Tons 



10 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 

12 
12 
24 
24 
14 
24 
25 



20 
20 
20 
23 
25 
25 
25 



20 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Name of 
Engine 



Enterprise . . 
Wabashaw.. 
Black Hawk 

Falcon 

Beloit 

Kansas 

Geneva 

Dixon 

W. McQueen 
John Ebbert 

Oregon 

Sterling 

W.H.Brown 
Thos. Dyer.. 

Fulton 

Nebraska. . . 
W.S.Hudson 

Hercules 

Samson 

Achilles 

Winnebago . 

Como 

Sauganash. . 

No. 1 

Clinton 

Lyons 

Wayne 

Savannah . . . 
Franklin .... 
Pecatonica. . 
Grey Hawk . 

Nevada 

Malta 

Nachusa. . . . 

Af ton 

Madison .... 
Fox River.. . 
Freeport. . . . 
Caledonia.. . 
Roscoe 



Name of Manufacturer 



Chicago Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Galena & Chicago Union Railroad 

Chicago Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Chicago Locomotive Works 

New York Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Chicago Locomotive Works 

Chicago Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Chicago Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Galena & Chicago Union Railroad Company 

Manchester (N. H.) Locomotive Works 

Manchester (N. H.) Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Chicago Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectady Locomotive Works 

Schenectadv Locomotive Works. 



When Put on 
Track 



Weight 
in Tons 



October 

October 

January 

February 

March 

April 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

July 

August 

September 13 

October 16 

November 16 

November IS 

November 18 



April 
April 
April 
August 
August 
August 
September 24 
October 8 
October 
November 
December 
January 
June 
August 
September 11 
September 18 
July 4 

August 31 
September 30 
October 15 



1853 
1853 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1S54 
1S54 
1855 
1855 
1855 
1S55 
1855 
1855 
1855 
1855 
1855 
1855 
1855 
1856 
1856 
1S56 
1S56 
1S56 
1857 
1S57 
1S57 
1857 



25 
25 

24 
25 

25 
25 

24 
25 

28 

28 

28 

28 

25 

25 

25 

28 

28 

24 

24 

24 

28 

25 

29 

25 

28 

28 

28* 

28J 

28" 

26 

26 

28 

28 

29 

28 

28 

25 

28 

28 

28 



In his report to the stockholders, of December 31, 1858, the president 
reported the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad had been opened from 
Clinton, Iowa, to Lisbon, Iowa, sixty-six miles. The resident engineer 
reports that connection had been made at Bass Creek or Plymouth, Wis., 
with the southwestern branch of the Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad, 
so that the Galena road could, by its operation of the Beloit & Madison 
Railroad, run its trains from Chicago, via Beloit, to Janesville, Wis., 118 
miles, and thus have a rail connection to Milwaukee. The running of 
these trains began on May 17, 1858. This year, for the first time, appears 
the name of H. H. Porter in connection with this road. He was placed, 
without title, in charge of the passenger business, and many years after 
became one of the general managers of the North-Wcstern road. This 
year it was announced that the Fox River Valley Railroad had become 
bankrupt. The bondholders took possession and turned it over to the 
Galena company to operate until it would be reorganized and placed on 
its feet again. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 21 

At the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Galena road on June 
2, 1858, the secretary of the corporation was ordered to print the names 
and residence of all of the stockholders of the company. The list was first 
published on August 11, 1858, and was continued, year by year, for many 
years. Walter S. Newberry was elected president of the road on June 
1, 1859, and at this time he appointed E. B. Talcott, general superintend- 
ent, and Dr. E. H. Williams, assistant general superintendent. This is 
the first mention of such officers in connection with this road, heretofore 
all of the business pertaining to the operation of the road having appar- 
ently been done over the name of the president or chief engineer. This 
Dr. E. H. Williams ultimately became the president of the Baldwin 
Locomotive Works at Philadelphia, Pa., and as such visited every part 
of the civilized world and introduced and sold his company's locomotives, 
from Russia to the Argentine Republic and Chili and Peru. Horatio' 
Anderson was appointed master mechanic this year, and was the first the 
road had. 

In the annual report for this year the president announces the com- 
pany had constructed "a bridge over the east channel of the Mississippi 
River between the Illinois shore and Little Rock-Island." This was the 
initial step that ultimately resulted in the construction of the second 
railroad bridge that spanned the Mississippi River at any point, and also- 
was the forerunner of the magnificent steel bridge that now connects 
Fulton, 111. and the city of Clinton, Iowa. 

This year the Fox River Valley Railroad, the bankruptcy of which was 
recently mentioned, was reorganized under the name of the "Elgin & 
State Line Railroad," and its operation was continued in the hands of 
the Galena company as it had been under the bankruptcy. It ultimately 
was purchased by the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company and 
is now its line to Lake Geneva and the country along the Fox River from 
Elgin, 111., northwardly. The president noticed the completion of the 
Racine & Mississippi road from Racine, Wis., to Freeport, 111., and the 
Kenosha & Rockford road from Kenosha, Wis., to Rockford, 111., and 
lamented that they, "in connection with the Chicago & North-Western, 
form competing lines with ours between the above places and Chicago." 
This remark should be remembered, as its origin and others similar 
became the real reasons for the great union, in a few years after these 
words were written, of the Galena & Chicago Union and the Chicago & 
North-Western companies, and that resulted in the extinguishment of 
the title of the Galena company and in the great expansion of the Chicago 
& North-Western corporation. Mention was also made this year of the 
formation of a company, under the name of the "Cedar Rapids & Missouri 
River Railroad," to build a railroad from Cedar Rapids westward toward 
the Missouri River. At this time iron rails, such as were then used in 
the West, cost $55 per ton. But little coal was yet used in locomotive 
engines on this road, wood being nearly its only fuel. 

In the fourteenth annual report G. M. Wheeler, the general ticket 
agent, shows that 170,839 passengers used the road for westbound trips 
and 160,087 passengers for eastbound trips. A steam-car ferry was this 
year placed in use by the "Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad," to 
run between the bridge of the Galena company on Little Rock-Island 
and the grounds of the former company in Clinton, Iowa, and thus 



22 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

formed "an uninterrupted line * * * between Chicago and Cedar 
Rapids, a distance of 218 miles." 

The annual report for the year ending December 31, 1861, said, 
"nothing has been added to the construction account during the year." 
This grew out of the first impending and then continuing War of the 
Rebellion, and this, too, accounts for "the loss of depreciated currency 
* * * which was caused by the breaking up of the entire banking 
system of the State [Illinois], the notes of these banks constituting, at the 
rime, nearly the entire circulating medium of the country." An ineffec- 
tual effort was made by the company this year to lease the roads of the 
two companies that were building west of Clinton, Iowa. 

"A violent tornado passed over the country through which a part of this road is 
located," the chief engineer reported, "doing considerable damage to buildings; * * * 
our bridge over the Pecatonica River at Freeport was blown down and demolished. 
It was a Howe truss bridge about 200 feet long, resting on a pier and two abutments. 
It was neither covered nor roofed, and yet the tremendous force of the wind lifted the 
whole superstructure from its bearings on the masonry, moved it bodily about ten 
feet to the south, and dropped it into the river, a total wreck." 

In the sixteenth annual report, dated December 31, 1862, W. H. 
Brown is announced as president, Orrington Lunt as vice-president, and 
G. M. Wheeler as the first auditor of the road. The often mentioned 
Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska and the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River rail- 
roads were this year leased by the Galena company and their operation 
began on August 1, 1862, by the leasing company. The Cedar Rapids & 
Missouri River road was then finished to Otter Creek (now Chelsea Sta- 
tion) about forty miles west of Cedar Rapids, and 151 west of the Mis- 
sissippi River. A concise history of these two important roads will be 
given in due time. Their control by the Galena company worked almost 
a revolution in its future and in their history. 

In the annual report for the seventeenth year, ending December 31, 
1863, the president informs the stockholders that the United States had 
early in the year requisitioned the road for sixty freight cars for use in 
the rebellious States, and for ten more in November, and although they 
were cheerfully furnished he says the road was much hampered thereby. 
As to fuel, the president said: 

FUEL 

"This important element in railway operations has demanded the serious attention 
of the board. The country upon either side of the Mississippi is essentially destitute 
of timber. The supply of wood has been sensibly diminishing since new lines of road 
have been completed and put into use, and, consequently, the price of this article has 
been affected by the unerring rule of demand and supply. It is now evident that the 
country through which your roads pass can not longer be relied upon for the supply 
of fuel. The coal used in engines fitted for its consumption has been mainly purchased 
by the cargo at Erie, Pa. Its quality is excellent, but the expense is large. The Illinois 
coal is much inferior, and its cost very considerably less per ton. It may, however, 
and must be used to a great extent for railway purposes. There are no coal beds on 
the line of your roads; the nearest are those upon Rock River, about thirty miles south- 
east of your terminus at Fulton. The quality of this coal is equal to the best of that 
yet found in the northern part of this State, and the supply is said to be inexhaustible. 
A comparatively short and easy line would connect Fulton with these coal beds, afford- 
ing not only a supply of fuel for the roads east and west of that point, but also a con- 
siderable traffic in that article for 100 miles upon either side of the river. In addition, 
the introduction of a new supply of fuel into this district of country, for family use 
and mechanical purposes, will limit the consumption of wood to such an extent as to 
gradually reduce its cost to its former standard." 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 23 

The president tells the stockholders that he has "modified and 
enlarged the buildings [the passenger depot] on the corner of Wells and 
North Water streets " in Chicago, so that "it is now three stories in height, 
45 feet on Wells Street and 75 feet on North Water Street." and that it 
was large enough and would be used for the general offices of the road 
as well as for a passenger station. It had "brick walls, a slate roof, and 
all the offices will be under one roof for the first time." 

Before the time arrived for making the eighteenth annual report the 
great consolidation with the Chicago & North-Western Railway had 
taken place, and the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad had passed out 
of existence. 

Before finally closing the history of "The Galena," the pioneer rail- 
road of the West, it may be interesting to our readers to have an 
"account of stock" taken and show the character of the property it had 
turned into the now combined ownership, its earnings, etc.: 

Total Miles Owned: 

Chicago to Freeport 120. 

Chicago to Clinton, Iowa 138 . 

Belvidere to Beloit 21 .8 

Elgin to Lake Geneva 43.2 

Total 323.0 

It also turned in its leases of the roads west of the Mississippi River. 

The total capital stock, 60,2S4 shares $ 6,028,400.00 

The total bonds (funded debt) 3,506,000.00 

The total book value of the property 10,952,115.36 

The total operating receipts for the vear 1863 2,193,295.46 

Of this, freight furnished $1,621,096.94 from 511,710 
tons hauled; and passenger $496,316 from 465,876 
passengers carried. 
The operating expenses for the year were $ 1,277,726.41 

THE FIRST RAILROAD DEPOT IN CHICAGO 

The first railroad depot that was built in Chicago was a one-story 
wooden affair built by the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad in the fall 
of 1848. It stood on what is now a triangular piece of vacant ground 
west of Canal Street and south of Kinzie Street, and but a short distance 
west of the west abutment of the city bridge that crosses the North 
Branch of the Chicago River at Kinzie Street. 

In those days there was a narrow street named West Water Street, 
that ran close along the North Branch of the Chicago River and east of 
what is now Canal Street. This depot ran east and west and its east end 
was entered from this West Water Street. The depot faced the railroad 
tracks, which were south of the depot. Whatever package freight the 
railroad had to handle in Chicago at this time was handled at this depot. 

In 1849 this building was enlarged and a portion of it was set aside 
for freight, while the original east end was still used for passengers. A 
second story was added to the structure and that was surmounted with 
a sort of observatory. This second story was used by the officers of the 
road as its general office, and in it John B. Turner, the president of the 
road, and his associates planned the extension of the road and controlled 
its destinies. West of the depot was what was substantially an open 
prairie, and from the observatory Mr. Turner often watched for the 
incoming of his trains, with the aid of a long, old-fashioned "marine" 



24 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

telescope that he possessed, and thus could announce the coming of a 
train while it was yet as far away as Austin, six miles. In those days the 
use of the telegraph was not even dreamed of on any Western railroad. 

In 1851 the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad began to purchase 
depot grounds east of the North Branch of the Chicago River, and in 
1852 and 1853 built a pontoon or floating bridge across the river on prac- 
tically the same ground where the Chicago & North- Western Railway 
bridge now stands. In those days a street ran along and not far north 
of the main Chicago River, and was named North Water Street, 

The second passenger depot was built in 1852 and 1853, east and west 
along this North Water Street, with its east end on Wells Street, It was 
built of brick and was two stories high. The passenger entrance was 
from Wells Street, but a sort of private alley, or perhaps an unbuilt-on 
lot, ran south from Kinzie Street, and this was used to reach the depot 
through the baggage room. On Wells Street, and north of this second 
depot, was a hotel known as the Hatch House, and this private alley, or 
open lot, seems to have been used by the guests of this hotel as well as 
by the frequenters and employes of the railroad depot. 

After the depot had been occupied for some time, Wells Street was 
filled in and raised about eight feet, and this caused the Galena company 
to acid another story to this depot, and in the room so made a portion of 
the general offices of the company were located. This building remained 
in use until the great fire of 1871, when it went up in smoke, like much 
more of Chicago. 

The third depot scarcely deserves to be named, but to make this his- 
tory full it must be referred to. In 1851, as is before stated, this road 
bought land east of the North Branch of the Chicago River, and on part 
of this purchase erected, on the east side of North Dearborn Street and 
south of Kinzie Street, a two-story building, the lower story of which 
was intended for freight purposes, while in the upper rooms some of the 
general officers of the road were to have their offices. For some time, 
but for reasons now not known, the passenger trains of the Galena road 
ran to and from this building, and while this was done neither the first 
nor second depots were used. The records of the company that were 
burned in the great fire of 1871 doubtless contained a full explanation of 
these facts. That this building was used as the road's passenger station 
is established beyond any question. 

The next passenger depot of the Chicago & North-Western Railway, 
which now had become the successor of the Galena company, was the one 
that was built on the then North Wells Street in the late fall of 1871. to 
take the place of the one that was burned in the great fire. It was a 
wooden structure and faced south, with an entrance from Wells Street. 

The next passenger depot of the road is the present structure that 
stands on the corner of Wells and Kinzie streets, and it was built in 1SS0 
to 1882 and occupied in 1882. It will be mentioned in another place in 
this history. 

OTHER CHICAGO DEPOTS OF THE NORTH-WESTERN COMPANY 

What is now a portion of the Chicago & North-Western Railway in 
Chicago was begun under the corporate name of the Illinois & Wisconsin 
Railroad Company, as will be told elsewhere. This afterward, by consoli- 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 25 



dation with the Rock River Valley Union Railroad, became the Chicago, 
St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad, and that, by bankruptcy and reorgan- 
ization, became the Chicago & North-Western Railway. This railroad, 
while under the second of the corporate titles, built, in 1854, and occu- 
pied a passenger depot in Chicago. It stood with its gable end to Kinzie 
Street and its greatest length west of and quite close to and parallel with 
the North Branch of the Chicago River. It was quite a pretentious 
structure of wood, and had a large train-shed that was shut off from 
Kinzie Street by slatted gates. 

After the Chicago & Milwaukee and the Milwaukee & Chicago rail- 
roads were consolidated, and ultimately those, together with the Galena 
& Chicago Union Railroad, became the present Chicago & North- Western 
Railway, this depot was known as the "Kinzie Street Depot," and was 
used until it was abandoned on the occupation of the present Wells 
Street depot in 1882. In early days two railroad companies owned and 
operated the railroad that ran between Chicago and Milwaukee. The 
southernmost, or Chicago end, was known as the Chicago & Milwaukee 
Railroad. In 1855 it built and occupied a passenger depot in Chicago. 
In those days a street ran from what is now West Kinzie Street, in a 
northwesterly direction east of and parallel with Milwaukee Avenue, and 
was known as Dunn Street. An extension of this street still exists west 
of North Halsted Street and west of Goose Island It begins at Fay Street 
and runs to, and a short distance beyond, Sangamon Street, and is known 
as Dix Street. North of Kinzie Street, and parallel thereto, and west of 
the north branch of the Chicago River, was a street known as Cook 
Street. This Milwaukee Passenger Depot, as it was called, was built in 
the angles formed by Kinzie, Dunn, and Cook streets. It was a one- 
story wooden building. This building ultimately passed into the posses- 
sion of the original Chicago & North- Western Railway Company. 

Some of the older travelers over the Galena road may remember they 
arrived at or left a passenger depot on the lake front. This fact should 
be explained. The explanation is this: 

At one time, and for years, through passenger trains were run between 
Chicago and Dubuque, Iowa. These trains ran between Chicago and 
Freeport, 111., over the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad, and between 
Freeport and Dubuque over the Illinois Central Railroad. From the 
lake front of Chicago, at about what is now the east end of Sixteenth 
Street, a railroad known as the St. Charles Air Line was built west to near 
the Des Plaines River and just south of the Galena road. This road, as 
we have already stated, was purchased by the Galena company. The 
Dubuque trains referred to ran into and out of the passenger depot of 
the Illinois Central Railway, thence over this St. Charles Air Line to 
Harlem (Oak Park), and thence by the main line of the Galena road to 
Freeport. At Harlem the part of the train that had left the Illinois 
Central depot met with another part of the train that had left the Galena 
depot, and from Harlem westward they were run as one train. Trains 
that were eastbound were split at Harlem, and one part, in the care of 
the conductor, was run over the St. Charles Air Line into the Illinois 
Central depot, while the rest of it, in charge of the baggageman or brake- 
man, was run over the main line of the Galena road into its depot on 
Wells Street. 



26 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

For years, the trains of what is now the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad ran from Turner Junction, thirty miles west of Chicago, over 
the Galena track to the Galena depot in Chicago, the Galena company 
furnishing that company, in Chicago, with depot and baggage space, 
and agents for selling its tickets. The Galena company also furnished 
depot room in its Chicago depot, and sold tickets there for the Chicago 
& Great Eastern Railroad Company, now a part of the Pittsburgh, Cin- 
cinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway. 

THE ROADS WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER 

As the control of the roads west of the Mississippi River was taken 
by lease by the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad, it seems proper in this 
place to give their early history. 

THE CHICAGO, IOWA & NEBRASKA RAILROAD 

The construction of this road was the outgrowth of a town-lot specula- 
tion. In 1854 there was an attempt made to build a railroad from Lyon^" 
to Iowa City, and quite a little work was done at various points on the line, 
but the enterprise finally failed for want of money. Some gentlemen 
who had been interested in this railroad conceived the idea of laying out 
a town at what was then called New York, two miles below Lyons, and 
making moiiey out of the sale of lots. In May, 1855, the Iowa Land 
Company was organized and shortly after purchased about 400 acres 
of land, 150 acres of which was laid out into lots and offered for sale in 
August of that year. The same persons organized a railroad company 
called the Mississippi & Iowa Central Railroad, and, to help the sale of 
lots, graded about half a mile of track northwesterly from Clinton. This 
new enterprise attracted the attention of L. B. Crocker of Oswego, N. Y., 
Thomas T. Davis and Austin Meyers of Syracuse, N. Y Through Mr. 
Crocker, Mr. Charles A. Lambard of Maine was interested, and through 
his influence a party of substantial New England capitalists joined in 
the enterprise. Among the most prominent of the latter were Capt. 
John Bertram of Salem, Mass.; Alfred W. Johnson of Belfast, Maine; 
Glidden & Williams of Boston, and Oakes Ames of North Easton, Mass. 
It is related of Captain Bertram that during the hard times following 
the panic of 1S57 he proposed, if all other means failed, to go home and 
sell a ship to raise money to buy rails. 

Prominent citizens of Cedar Rapids also became interested in the rail- 
road enterprise, among whom were George Greene, John Weare, and 
S. C. Bever. Mr. Horace Williams came to Clinton in January, 1857, and 
thereafter was the general representative of the New England interests 
in the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad and the Iowa Land Company, 
as well as of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad, thereafter 
built as an extension of the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska road. 

The Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska corporation was organized in January, 
1856, and the work of construction began early in that year. Track- 
laying was started at Clinton in August, 1856, and the track completed 
to Cedar Rapids in June, 1859. Milo Smith was chief engineer during 
the entire construction of this road, and was its superintendent up to 
some time in 1861, when ho was succeeded by Major Charles N. Bodfish, 
with Isaac B. Howe, a practical railroad engineer, as his assistant. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 27 

In 1S62 the Chicago, Iowa tfc Nebraska Railroad was leased to the 
Galena & Chicago Union Railroad, which company in 1864 completed 
the bridge across the Mississippi from Little Rock-Island to the Clinton 
side. From and after the execution of the lease aforesaid the Galena 
& Chicago Union Railroad Company and its successor, the Chicago & 
North-Western Railway Company, operated the railroad under this lease 
until August 1, 1884, when the Chicago & North- Western Company pur- 
chased the entire road and property of the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska 
Company and became the owner of the fee title to the same, the Chicago, 
Iowa & Nebraska Company going out of existence. 

ALBANY RAILROAD BRIDGE COMPANY 

This bridge company was incorporated by an act of the Illinois Legis- 
lature on February 14, 1857, with the following stockholders: Barzillia 
Cottle, William Prothrow, William W. Durant, Thomas J. W. Long, 
George H. Parker, Edward B. Warner, and Anthony J. Mattson, for the 
purpose of building a bridge across the Mississippi River between Illinois 
and Iowa and for the use of the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad. 

Some of the stockholders of the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad 
acquired this charter, and under such charter built a bridge from the 
easterly main shore of the Mississippi to Little Rock-Island, opposite 
Clinton, Iowa, which bridge was completed in January, 1860, and cars 
were for several years ferried over on boats from Little Rock-Island to 
the Iowa side, thus making a direct connection between the Galena & 
Chicago Union and the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska railroads. 

THE CORPORATE GENESIS OF THE BRIDGE 

February 14, 1857, the Albany Bridge Company was chartered by the State of 
Illinois. Built the east end of the bridge in I860, and acquired by lease" from the Iowa 
Land Company the right to operate a ferry over the remaining part of the river. 

June 26, 1862, the Albany Bridge Company leased to the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska 
Railroad Company the bridge and ferry rights, for the term of its charter. 

July 3 1862, the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad Company assigned the lease 
to the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad Company. 

June 2, 1864, the Galena & Chicjgo Union Railroad Corn-any consolidated with 
the Chicago & North- Western Railway Company, which last named company, in 1865, 
built the west end of the bridge, having authority of legislation as follows: 

Illinois — By act of February 18, 1859, gave to the Galena & Chicago Union Rail- 
road Company the right to bridge the river at this point. 

Iowa— By act of April 5, 1864 (Ch. 130), authorizes any railroad company or bridge 
company of that State to bridge the river, and Section 4 of same makes the act appli- 
cable to corporations of the State of Illinois (and some other Stites). 

Iowa Legislature — By Resolution No. 22, of 1866, requested Congress to declare 
the Albany Bridge a "post route." 

Congress — By act of February 27, 1867 (Book 14, page 412), declared the Albany 
Bridge a "post route" and a "lawful structure." 

The Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, having assumed the obligations 
of the original lease, continues to pay to the Albany Bridge Company the annual rental. 

THE CEDAR RAPIDS & MISSOURI RIVER RAILROAD 

In May, 1856, Congress passed what was then called the "Iowa Land 
Bill," making a grant of land to the State of Iowa to aid in the construc- 
tion of four lines of railway across said State, one of which was from 
Lyons City, thence "northwesterly to a point of intersection with the 
main line of the Iowa Central Air Line Railroad near Maquoketa, thence 
on said main line running as near as practicable to the 42d parallel across 



28 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

the State of Iowa to the Missouri River." The General Assembly of the 
State of Iowa, by an act approved July 14, 1856, granted the lands 
inuring to the State for the construction of the line from Lyons City west- 
wardly, to the Iowa Central Air Line Company, upon certain conditions 
contained in said act. The Iowa Central Air Line Railroad Company 
began construction in the year 1856 and did considerable grading at 
•different points as far west as Anamosa, but the panic of 1857 coming on, 
the work was stopped and never again resumed by the Iowa Central Air 
Line Company. 

For the purpose of obtaining the land grant before mentioned and 
•continuing the railroad west from Cedar Rapids, the Cedar Rapids & 
Missouri River Railroad Company was organized on June 14th, 1859. 
The persons active in this matter were the eastern gentlemen then 
■controlling the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad, among whom were 
John Bertram, L. B. Crocker, and Oakes Ames, and also John Weare and 
John F. Ely of Cedar Rapids, and G. M. Woodbury of Marshalltown. 
John I. Blair became interested in the enterprise in 1861 and was there- 
after prominently connected with the construction and completion of the 
road and control of the affairs of the company. L. B. Crocker was the 
first president and W. W. Walker secretary. 

In March, 1860, the State of Iowa resumed the land grant from the 
Iowa Central Air Line Railroad Company and gave it to the Cedar 
Rapids & Missouri River Railroad. Work was begun on the exten- 
sion west from Cedar Rapids in 1860, the bridge over the Cedar River 
was built in the winter of 1860-61, and forty miles of track com- 
pleted to Otter Creek station (now Chelsea) during the year 1861; to 
Marshalltown in December, 1862; to State Center in 1863; and on July 1, 
1864, to Nevada; and in December, 1864, the track was laid to Boone, 
but the road was not surfaced up and finished to Boone until the succeed- 
ing year. Milo Smith was the chief engineer until the road was finished 
to Marshalltown; after that W. W. Walker was the chief engineer until 
construction was completed. 

In July. 1S64, Congress made an additional grant of lands to the Cedar 
Rapids & Missouri River Railroad and authorized it to construct a line 
to Council Bluffs. The construction of this line was begun at Boone in 
December, 1865, and the track laid to Council Bluffs in January, 1867, 
but regular service between Woodbine and Council Bluffs was not insti- 
tuted until April of that year. In turning over the land grant of 1856 to 
the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad Company the State of Iowa 
required the railroad company to build a railroad to connect the Chicago, 
Iowa & Nebraska Railroad with the city of Lyons. This connecting link 
was built in 1S69. The Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad Company 
also built 6;j miles of railroad connecting Missouri Valley Junction with 
the Sioux City & Pacific Railroad at California Junction, and sold it 
to the Sioux City & Pacific Company. In July, 1862, the main 
line of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad, extending from 
Cedar Rapids westerly, then built and to be built, was leased to the 
Galena A: Chicago Union Railroad Company, which company and its suc- 
cessor, the Chicago & North- Western Railway Company, controlled and 
operated the several portions of the line as they were from time to time 
completed. In 1S65 a new and amended lease of this line was made to 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 29 

the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, who continued to 
operate the line until 1884, when the Chicago & North-Western purchased 
the line and became the owner in fee simple. 

The total amount of bonds issued by the Cedar Rapids & Missouri 
River Railroad was $3,614,000. 

Common stock $6,850,400 

7 per cent preferred stock 769,600 

Total stock, common and preferred $7,620,000 

In 1869 the Iowa Railroad Land Company was organized for the pur- 
pose of managing and disposing of the lands granted to the railroad 
company. The capital stock of the land company was made the same 
in volume as that of the railroad company, and one share of stock of the 
land company was given to each holder of one share of stock in the rail- 
road company, it being the purpose of the land company to dispose of the 
lands to actual settlers, so as to develop the country and make business 
for the railroad, all of which has been successfully accomplished, 

SIOUX CITY & PACIFIC RAILROAD 

Under the provisions of the act of 1862 providing for the construction 
of the Union Pacific Railroad, that company was authorized and re- 
quired to construct a railroad and telegraph line from Sioux City to a 
connection with the Iowa branch of the Union Pacific Railroad whenever 
there should have been a line of railroad completed through Minnesota 
or Iowa to Sioux City. By the act of July 2, 1864, amending the original 
Union Pacific act, the Union Pacific Railroad was released from the 
construction of said branch, and any company organized or to be 
organized under the laws of Iowa, Minnesota, Dakota, or Nebraska as 
should by the President of the United States be designated or approved 
for that purpose was authorized to construct said branch and to receive 
lands and subsidy bonds to the same extent as the Union Pacific Rail- 
road would have acquired for the construction thereof under the act of 
1862. It was further provided that if a railroad should not be com- 
pleted to Sioux City across Iowa or Minnesota within eighteen months, 
then the company which should have been so designated might com- 
mence, continue, and complete the construction of said Sioux City 
branch. 

The Sioux City & Pacific Railroad Company was organized at Du- 
buque, Iowa, in August, 1864, for the purpose of constructing the said 
branch, and was by the President of the United States designated for 
that purpose. The corporators and first board of directors were Piatt 
Smith, L. B. Crocker, M. K. Jesup, James F. Wilson, A. W. Hubbard, 
Chas. A. Lambard, Frederick Schuchardt, William B. Allison, and 
John I. Blair. John I. Blair was the first president of the company, 
and W. W. Hamilton secretary. The Sioux City & Pacific Company 
passed under control of Messrs. Blair, Ames, Lambard, Croker, Bertram, 
Glidden, and Williams, and other stockholders in the Cedar Rapids & 
Missouri River Railroad, and the money for the construction of the 
road was subscribed by them and their associates. 

Construction was begun in the spring of 1867. The 6^ miles built 
by the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad Company, connecting 
Missouri Valley Junction with California Junction, was finished in August 

3 



30 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

of that year. Track-laying began at California Junction in September, 
1S67. Thirty-six miles were completed by the first day of December 
of that year, and 49^ miles before the first of January, 1868. The track 
was completed into Sioux City in February, 1868. From California 
Junction to Fremont the line was finished early in 1869. The cars were 
ferried across the Missouri River during the summer months, and crossed 
on a temporary bridge during the winter months up to the fall of 1883, 
when the bridge was opened that had been built over the river. L. 
Burnett was the engineer in charge of construction, and the superin- 
tendent of the road to January 1, 1878. 

The Sioux City & Pacific Company received from the United States 
under its congressional grant 42,500 acres of land, and from the State 
of Nebraska, through a consolidation with the Nebraska Air Line Rail- 
road, 46,000 acres. It received from the United States Government 
a loan of 6 per cent bonds to the extent of $16,000 per mile of road 
constructed from Sioux City to Fremont. It issued its own first mortgage 
bonds to the amount of $1,628,000. The earnings of the road not being 
sufficient to pay the interest on these first mortgage bonds, the avails 
of the two land grants and from the sale of town lots along the line were 
used to make up the deficiency. After these assets were exhausted, 
the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River and Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska 
companies, through loans and other methods of assistance, made up 
the deficit until the sale of these last named railroads in 1884. In 1880 
the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska and the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River 
companies acquired by purchase from the individual stockholders over 
90 per cent of the stock of the Sioux City company. This stock was in 
the treasury of the Iowa roads at the time of their purchase by the 
Chicago & North-Western in 1884, and thus became the property of the 
Chicago & North-Western Railway. 

THE BRIDGE OVER THE MISSOURI RIVER 

In 1882 Congress granted to the Sioux City & Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany the right to build a bridge across the Missouri River to connect 
the Iowa and Nebraska portions of the railway. The Sioux City & 
Pacific Company not being financially able to undertake the work, 
it assigned its right under the said act to the Missouri Valley & Blair 
Railway & Bridge Company, a corporation organized for that purpose. 
The stock in the bridge company was taken by the several railroad com- 
panies whose roads made up the through line from Fremont to Chicago, 
namely, the Sioux City & Pacific, Cedar Rapids & Missouri River, 
Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska, and Chicago & North-Western companies, 
each taking stock in proportion to its mileage in the through line. The 
money for the construction of the bridge was raised principally by the 
sale of bonds, which bonds were guaranteed — both principal and 
interest — by the several railway companies holding stock in the bridge 
company. The work of construction was commenced early in the 
summer of 1882, and the bridge completed and opened for traffic in 
November, 1883. When the ice broke up in March, 1884, it carried 
out 1,600 feet of the trestle work forming the east approach to the bridge, 
and interrupted traffic until May of that year, when a temporary trestle 
was erected and business resumed over the bridge, which has gone on 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 31 

uninterruptedly since that date. Horace Williams was the president 
of the bridge company during construction. The plans for the entire 
bridge and approaches, together with the protection works, were made 
by George S. Morrison, under whose direct charge and control the entire 
work of construction was performed. 

MAPLE RIVER RAILROAD 

The Maple River Railroad Company was organized in 1876 to build 
a branch from the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad near Carroll 
to Ida Grove, Iowa, and thence down the valley of the Maple River. 
The board of directors was made up of gentlemen holding similar posi- 
tions on the boards of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River and Chicago, 
Iowa & Nebraska railroads. Horace Williams was the first president. 
The line was leased to the Chicago & North- Western Railway Company 
in advance of construction. The Cedar Rapids & Missouri River and 
Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska companies agreed to allow sufficient draw- 
backs, which, in addition to the rental, should meet the interest on 
the bonds. The securities, both bonds and stocks, were taken by the 
stockholders of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River and the Chicago, Iowa 
& Nebraska companies. Construction was begun in 1876, and in 1877 
the line was completed from Maple River Junction to Mapleton, a dis- 
tance of about sixty miles. 

In 1879 a branch was built from Wall Lake Junction to Sac City. 
In 1882 the Sac City branch was extended to Holstein, and in 1883 to 
Kingsley. The road was operated under the lease by the Chicago & 
North-Western Railway Company until August, 1884, when it was 
bought by the Chicago & North- Western Railway Company, in connec- 
tion with the purchase of the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska and the Cedar 
Rapids & Missouri River railroads. In 1886 the main line was extended 
from Mapleton to Onawa. The Sac City branch was extended from 
Kingsley to Moville in 1887, and in 1901 from Moville to Sargeants Bluffs. 

THE FREMONT, ELKHORN & MISSOURI VALLEY RAILROAD 

This company was organized at Fremont, Neb., in January, 1869, 
to construct a line up the Elkhorn Valley, in Nebraska, and obtained 
a land grant from the State of Nebraska amounting to about 45,000 
acres. In 1869 John I. Blair and his associates in the Sioux City & 
Pacific and the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River enterprises obtained control 
of the company, and undertook the construction of the railroad. The 
first ten miles of track north from Fremont were laid late in the season 
of 1869. In 1870 the road was finished to West Point, and leased to the 
Sioux City & Pacific Company, which company from that time on con- 
tinued to operate under this lease the several extensions of the Elkhorn 
road up to August, 1884. In 1871 the road was extended to Wisner, 
a distance of fifty-one miles from Fremont, where the terminus remained 
until 1879, when the main line was built to Oakdale, and six miles of 
track laid on the Creighton branch north of Norfolk. In 1880 the main 
line was extended from Oakdale to Neligh, and the Creighton branch 
finished to Plainview. In 1881 the main line was extended to Long 
Pine, and the Creighton branch finished to Creighton. In 1882 the 
main line was extended to Thatcher, and in 1883 to Valentine. In 



32 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

August, 1884, at the time of the purchase of the Iowa roads by the 
Chicago & North-Western, this last-named company acquired all the 
stock in the Fremont. Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad, and there- 
after the work of extension was pushed vigorously. In the fall of 18S4 
about eighty miles of the line were graded beyond Valentine, and track- 
laying began thereon in April, 1885. The track reached Chadron in 
July, and Buffalo Gap in November of that year. The Black Hills line 
was finished to Rapids City early in July, 1886, from Rapids City to 
Whitewood in October, 1887, and from Whitewood to Belle Fourche 
in 1890. The branch from Whitewood into Deadwood was built in 1S90. 
The narrow gauge extension from Deadwood to Bald Mountain and 
Ruby Basin mines was opened for traffic in 1891. The Hot Springs 
branch was built from Buffalo Gap to Hot Springs in 1890. 

Construction was begun on the extension into Wyoming in the 
summer of 1885. Track-laying was begun at Dakota Junction in April, 
1886, and completed to Douglas in August of that year. In 18S7 a 
bridge was built across the Platte River west of Douglas, and the track 
extended to Glen Rock, and from Glen Rock to Casper in May and 
June, 1888. 

In 1885 the Chicago & North-Western decided to enter the South 
Platte country. The line from Fremont to Lincoln was located in the 
winter of 1885 and grading began on it early in 1886. The bridge across 
the Platte River was finished in August, and the track completed to 
Lincoln in October, 1886. In 1887 the Hastings line was constructed 
from Platte River Junction to Hastings, and the Superior line from 
Linwood to Geneva. In 1888 this last-named line was finished from 
Geneva to Superior. The Scribner branch was built from Scribner to 
Lindsay in 1886, and from Lindsay to Oakdale in 1887. In 1887 the 
Elkhorn system was connected with Omaha and the South Omaha Stock 
Yards by a line built from Arlington Station, east of Fremont on the 
Sioux City & Pacific road. The Creighton branch was extended from 
Creighton to Verdigre in 1888. 

THE EXTINCTION OF THE GALENA COMPANY 
We have now reached the point where we have to part company 
with "The Pioneer Line." In the future it has not only to share the 
fortunes of another corporation, but is to exist, be maintained and 
operated under another corporation's legal title. We have, in the pre- 
ceding pages, seen it grow from a mere name on paper until at last it 
became a fact, and soon the leading railroad of the west. It was the 
leader in nearly everything that belonged to railroad operation. In 
financial standing and credit it was without a peer. It had the best, 
largest, and most modern locomotive engines. Its cars were inferior to 
those of no other road. It built the first and had the best passenger 
depot in Chicago, and better facilities for handling freight than any 
other road there. It had built and adopted the first railroad mail-car 
that was placed in service. It also had the first contract for the use of Pull- 
man sleeping cars that was made by the Pullman Company. Its friends 
were lesion and all of them saw with regret the extinction of its name. 



NOTE.- We are indebted to Mr. P. E. Hall of Cedar Rapids for the admirable and succinct 
history which by his courtesy we have been enabled to give of the roads west of the Mississippi River. 
It is certain that no other person now living could have furnished the data he has given. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 33 

THE GREAT CONSOLIDATION 

In these days, when the merger of railroad corporations is of frequent 
occurrence, little is said or thought about it by the public. In 1864 
it was very different, and the union of the Galena corporation with 
that of the North- Western was much more than a seven-days' won- 
der. It was talked about from the Atlantic to the slopes of the Missouri 
River, and opinions were as varied about it as were the people that gave 
them. It is believed that this was the first really important railroad 
consolidation that had taken place in the United States. The directors 
of the consolidated North- Western Company issued an explanatory cir- 
cular on the question and from it we quote as follows: 

"Among the reasons which influenced those who, on account of their large interests 
in these roads, have given more particular attention to the subject and advised this 
course are the following: Much of the territory traversed by these roads was so situated 
as to induce injurious competition between them. The union of both gives greater 
strength and power, favoring more advantageous and extended connections, and better 
relations with other railroads built and to be built, and will aid to prevent the con- 
struction of such roads as would only serve to create injurious competition, without 
any adequate increase of the aggregate earnings of the roads competing. Decided 
economy, material reduction of expenses, and increased and more profitable service 
of engines and cars will also be the result of cooperation in the place of competition, 
and of one management of both roads. The basis and terms of this consolidation are 
substantially as follows: For each share of Galena & Chicago Union Railroad Com- 
pany's stock the holder will receive one share of the preferred stock and one share of 
the common stock of the consolidated Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, 
and $3 in money. The preferred stock of this company to be issued in exchange for 
the stock of the Galena company is entitled to preferences to the aggregate extent of 
10 per cent in the dividends which may be declared in any one year, out of the net 
earnings in such year, in the manner following, to wit: First, to a preference of 7 per 
cent; and after, dividends of 7 per cent on the common stock; then, secondly, to a 
further preference of 3 per cent; after, a further dividend of 3 per cent on the common 
stock; both classes of stock shall be entitled to equal rates per share in any further 
dividends. 

WHY THE PRESENT NAME WAS ADOPTED 

"The principal reason for dropping the pioneer name of Galena & Chicago Union 
Railroad Company in the consolidation will be apparent when it is observed that no 
portion of either of the consolidated roads touched Galena; and to retain the name of 
the Chicago & North- Western Railway Company involved no change of books or blanks, 
and is sufficiently comprehensive to include the large territory now penetrated by the 
united roads." 

WHAT FORMED THE CONSOLIDATED ROAD 

In the circular we have quoted from we find the contributions of each 
corporation were as follows: 

As to the Galena Company Miles. 

1. The original Galena & Chicago line, extending from Chicago to Freeport. . . . 121 

2. The Dixon Air Line, extending from the Junction, thirty miles west of Chicago, 

due west, through Geneva to Dixon, and to Fulton on the Mississippi River; 
and to east end of bridge over the Mississippi, nearly two miles below Fulton 10S 

3. The Beloit Branch, from Belvidere to Beloit, about 21 

4. The St. Charles Air Line, extending to Harlem, about 9 

5. The Elgin & State Line Railroad, extending from Elgin north to Richmond, 

about 33 

The branch from the old line to Elgin, over 2 

Making in all 294 

The double track from Chicago to the Junction (thirty miles) is only counted as 
thirty miles in the above statement, the second track not being taken into account. 



34 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

Iii addition it also contributed to the consolidated corporation the perpetual Miles. 
lease of the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad, about (now built). .... 82 

Also, of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad 122 

Also, perpetual lease of the Beloit & Madison Railroad 47 

Making a total of leased roads operated by the said Galena Company at the 

time of the consolidation equal to 251 

Total number of miles owned by the Galena Company at the time of consolidation 294 
Total number of miles of leased roads operated by the Galena Company at the time 

of the consolidation 227 

Add to this the extension of twenty-four miles of leased road from Nevada to 

Boonesboro, since consolidation 24 

Total 545 

The original North-Western Company put into and contributed to 
the consolidated road mileage as follows : 

As to the North-Western Company Miles 

1. Its main line, extending from Chicago, via Janesville, to Green Bay 242 

2. Its " Kenosha Division," extending from the town of Kenosha to its junction at 

Rockford with the old Galena road 73 

Making a total length of railroad owned by Chicago & North- Western Railway at 

the time of consolidation 315 

Making a total length of roads owned and leased by both companies at the time of 

consolidation 860 

The following is a list of all who ever were presidents of the Galena 
& Chicago Union Railroad Company and dates of their elections: 

Theophilus W. Smith July 3, 1836 John B. Turner June 5, 1851 

Elijah K. Hubbard November 29, 1837 Walter L. Newberry June 1, 1859 

William B. Ogden February 17, 1846 William H. Brown June 4, 1862 

J. Y. Scammon pro tem June 2, 1848 John B. Turner June 1. 1864 

THE LAST BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE GALENA COMPANY 

The last board of directors (and officers) who were elected by the 
stockholders of the Galena road at the annual meeting, on the third of 
June, 1863, were as follows: 

DIRECTORS 

William H. Brown Chicago Silas B. Cobb Chicago 

Orrington Lunt Chicago John Wenfcworth Chicago 

George Watson Chicago John H. Foster Chicago 

Edward K. Rogers Chicago Thos. D. Robertson Rockford 

Mark Skinner Chicago William H. Ferry Utica, N. Y. 

Benj. W. Raymond Chicago 

OFFICERS 

President William H. Brown Secretary William M. Larrabee 

Vice-President Orrington Lunt Auditor George M. Wheeler 

Acting Director William H. Ferry Attorney Elliott Anthony 

General Superintendent Edward B. Talcott Engineer W. S. Pope 

Assistant Superintendent . . . Edward H. Williams 

THE LAST BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE ORIGINAL CHICAGO & NORTH- 
WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

The last board of directors (and officers) of the Chicago & North- 
Western Railway Company, before the consolidation and who were 
elected June 4, 1863, were as follows: 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 35 

DIRECTORS 

William B. Ogden Chicago William A. Booth New York 

P. H. Smith Appleton, Wis. Lowell Holbrook New York 

George L. Dunlap Chicago C. S. Seyton New York 

M. C. Darling. . . Fond du Lac, Wis. H. H. Boody New York 

A. L. Pritchard Watertown, Wis. J. D. Fish New York 

J. J. R. Pease Janesville, Wis. George M. Bartholomew Hartford, Conn. 

Joseph A. Wood Janesville, Wis. 

OFFICERS 

William B. Ogden President George P. Lee Treasurer 

P. H. Smith Vice-President James R. Young Secretary 

George L. Dunlap Superintendent H. H. Boody Transfer Agent, in New York 



THE ORIGINAL CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN COMPANY 

HISTORICAL 

We will now endeavor to show the origin, construction, growth, 
failures, and ultimate destiny of the properties that finally came to be 
known under the corporate name of The Chicago & North-Western 
Railway; and that gave its name, at the time of the consolidation with 
the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad, to the corporation that is in 
existence to-day. 

Previous to 1854 the Galena & Chicago Union Company had, as it will 
be remembered, built a branch line from Belvidere, 111., to Beloit, Wis., 
and, in 1854, had leased what there was of the Madison & Beloit Railroad. 
In 1847 the projectors of the Galena & Chicago Union road visited 
Janesville and other places in Wisconsin, soliciting aid to be used in 
building its projected lines. Incited by the promises of cooperation the 

MADISON & BELOIT RAILROAD 

was chartered by the Legislature of Wisconsin (under act of August 19, 
1848) on July 3, 1849. The company was also organized on that day. 
Its charter was amended February 4, 1850. The following were its first 
board of directors and officers: Geo. F. A. Atherton, Timothy Jackman, 
Chas. Stevens, Ira Miltimore, John J. R. Pease, Wm. A. Lawrence, Wm. 
F. Tompkins, A. Hyatt Smith, and Benj. F. Pixley ; A. Hyatt Smith, presi- 
dent; Wm. A. Lawrence, secretary; and Charles H. Parker, treasurer. This 
company was chartered to build a line of railroad from Beloit, Wis., via 
Janesville, Madison, and La Crosse, to a point on the Mississippi River near 
St. Paul, Minn., and also a line from Janesville, Wis., to Fond du Lac, Wis. 
No part of the line between Janesville and Fond du Lac seems to have 
been built under this charter. By act of the Wisconsin Legislature, 
approved February 9, 1850, the name of the company was changed to 
The Rock River Valley Union Railroad Company. Under that name, 
in 1854, a railroad was built from Minnesota Junction to Fond du Lac, 
twenty-nine miles. 

THE ILLINOIS & WISCONSIN RAILROAD COMPANY 

This corporation was chartered by the Legislature of Illinois by its 
act of February 12, 1851, and under it the company was organized on 
December 30, 1851, with the following board of directors and officers: 
Neill Donnelly, Enos W. Smith, William Sloan, John P. Chapin, Ithrian 
Taylor, Henry Sherman, Martin Thrall, Robert J. Walker, John B. 



36 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

Macey, A. Hyatt Smith, Joseph B. Doe, Isaac Woodle, and Major J. 
Thomas as directors, and Wm. Sloan as president, Enos W. Smith as 
secretary, and A. Hyatt Smith as treasurer. The charter granted author- 
ity to the company to build a line of railroad from "the north line of 
McHenry County, Illinois, to Woodstock, in the same county, and thence 
to a point on the Chicago & Galena Union Railroad in Cook [sic], Kane, 
and McHenry counties, and to connect with any railroad in Illinois or 
Wisconsin, and within fifty years to build into Chicago, also to connect with 
any railroad south of Chicago and through Indiana," and to consolidate 
with any other company. Under this authority there was built, in 185-4, 
a railroad from Chicago northwestwardly to Cary, 111., about thirty- 
nine miles. A little grading was also done beyond that point. Neither 
of the above-named companies alone proved to be financially strong 
enough to complete the lines they had projected. In the meantime the 
Madison & Beloit company had changed its name and corporate title, 
as we have already stated, to that of the Rock River Valley Union Rail- 
road Company. Charles Butler of New York was president of this road at 
this time. 

In 1855 the Rock River Valley Company applied to the Legislature 
of Wisconsin for a law authorizing it to consolidate with the Illinois & 
Wisconsin Company, and the Legislature granted that power by an 
act approved March 10, 1855. On March 31, 1855, the Illinois & Wis- 
consin and the Rock River Valley Union companies were consolidated, 
and a new corporation was formed thereof, which took the name of the 
Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad Company. 

THE CHICAGO, ST. PAUL & FOND DU LAC RAILROAD COMPANY 

On June 21, 1S56, the Ontonagon & State Line Railroad Company 
of Michigan; on October 26, 1S56, the Wisconsin & Lake Superior Rail- 
road Company of Wisconsin; and on January 14, 1857, the Marquette & 
State Line Railroad of Michigan were organized and given authority 
to build railroads beyond the northern end of the just-formed Chicago, 
St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad. In March, 1857, all of the above- 
named companies were formally consolidated with the Chicago, St. Paul 
& Fond du Lac Company, and thereafter lost their separate identity. 

In one of its earliest reports the directors of this road stated: 

"The object and desire of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad Company 
from the beginning was the extension of their line from Janesville northwest via Madi- 
son and La Crosse to St. Paul, and from Janesville north along the valley of Rock 
River to Fond du Lac, and to the great iron and copper regions of Lake Superior." 

The organization of and consolidation with the three roads named 
allowed the consolidated corporation to undertake the completion of 
those plans. The consolidated company proceeded as fast as possible 
to close up the gap between Cary, 111., and Minnesota Junction, Wis., 
and completed it in 1859, thus forming a continuous line from Chicago 
via Janesville and Watcrtown to Fond du Lac, 176 miles. In June, 
1856, by the almost unaided efforts of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond 
du Lac Company, the Congress of the United States was induced to 
make a grant of land to the State of Wisconsin, to aid in completing 
its lines of road. At an extra session of the Legislature of Wisconsin, 
held in September and October, 1856, a contest arose over this grant, 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 37 

and the result was the land upon the northwestern part of the line was 
given to the La Crosse & Milwaukee Railroad Company, and the lands 
on the northern part of the line were given to the Wisconsin & Lake 
Superior Railroad Company, a corporation that was chartered by this 
Legislature for the express purpose of giving to it this land grant. 

WISCONSIN & LAKE SUPERIOR RAILROAD COMPANY 

The following were named as the incorporators of this company: 
Herman Haertel, Alfred Lamberson, Cyrus P. Hiller, Charles Kuehn, 
Bertine Pinckney, James H. Weed, Anson Ballard. James Duane Doty, 
George F. Wright, B. Frank Moore, Julius White, William Scott, John 
Bradley, Albert Winslow, and Joseph Turner. The Chicago, St. Paul 
& Fond du Lac Company was to be deprived of the grant of lands which 
had been obtained for the State of Wisconsin by its efforts, but as we 
have already stated the Wisconsin & Lake Superior and the Chicago, 
St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad companies were ultimately consoli- 
dated, and thus the consolidated company secured the land grant of 
six sections (3.S40 acres) per mile along its line in Wisconsin, and in 
this way defeated the plans of its rivals. The scandals connected with 
the efforts made to wrest these lands from the Fond du Lac company, 
that had secured them to the State of Wisconsin from the United States, 
and to give them to another corporation are parts of the history of the 
State of Wisconsin that will live forever in its annals. 

THE PANIC OF 1857 AND THE SALE OF THE FOND DU LAC ROAD 

A great financial revulsion came in 1857 and at once put a stop 
to further construction of this and many other lines of railroad, and 
this company became bankrupt. In February, 1859, in Illinois, and 
in March (and October), 1859, in Wisconsin, the Legislatures authorized 
the reorganization of the company, and on June 6, 1S59, a new com- 
pany was organized, under the name of Chicago & North- Western Rail- 
way Company, to which was passed by purchase under the foreelosure 
of its mortgages all the franchises and rights of the Chicago, St. Paul 
& Fond du Lac Railroad Company. The road was sold at auction at 
Janesville on June 2, 1859. The trustees who made the sale for the 
bondholders were: James Winslow, W. B. Ogden, W. A. Booth, and 
J. F. D. Lanier, and they deeded the road to Samuel J. Tilden (of New 
York) and 0. B. Ashly, as agents, and they in turn deeded it to the 
newly organized Chicago & North-Western Railway Company. The 
Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad cost the North-Western 
Company at this sale $10,849,938 in the stock and bonds of the new 
(purchasing) company. W. B. Ogden was president of the road at the 
time of the sale, and became the first president of the newly formed 
company. 

The first board of directors of the new company were: W. B. Ogden, 
Perry H. Smith, E. W. Hutchins, G. M. Bartholomew, Charles Butler, 
Thomas H. Perkins, M. D. Ogden, A. C. Courtney, Henry Smith, J. R. 
Young, J. J. R. Pease, M. C. Darling, and Albert Winslow. 

THE BEGINNING OF THE NORTH-WESTERN 
Here, then, we hare the first legal use of the name and title of the 
Chicago & North-Western Railway Company. On April 10, 1861, the 



38 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

company was authorized by the Legislature of Wisconsin to extend 
its line, via Fort Howard or Green Bay, to the north line of Wisconsin, 
at the Menominee River. During 1859 the road was completed to 
Oshkosh (194 miles), and connection made by steam ferry to Appleton. 
In 1861 the road was completed to Appleton, twenty miles north of Osh- 
kosh, and in 1862 the line was extended to Fort Howard (Green Bay), 
forming a line 242 miles long. 

The road, although at this time it owned thirty-three locomotive 
engines, and 674 cars of all kinds, was so nearly bankrupt that it 
could hardly pay the wages of its employes, and could not pay the interest 
on its bonds. As a result of its poverty five of its semi-annual interest 
coupons had to be funded, and even with that help the directors and 
officers of the company had to loan the road their own money to keep it 
going. Grounds were bought this year in Chicago on the west bank of 
the north branch of the Chicago River for depot purposes. This ground 
extended from 130 feet north of Kinzie Street along the river for about 
one-half mile, and was from 150 to 500 feet wide, east and west. The 
lot immediately adjoining Kinzie Street was not then bought, as the 
owner asked what was believed to be an extortionate price therefor. 
To reach its ground from Kinzie Street the company had to cross this 
lot and had to pay the owner SI, 000 per year crossing right. This 
show r s that human nature, as illustrated by the owners of lands needed 
by railroads, did not differ much in 1861 from what it is to-day. 

THE KENOSHA & BELOIT RAILROAD COMPANY 

This company was chartered by the State of Wisconsin on March 
4, 1853, and the following commissioners, Samuel Hale, Alonzo Camp- 
bell, Chas. M. Baker, E. W. Evans, Josiah Bond, George Bennett, Henry 
B. Hindale, S. H. Stafford, Samuel R. McClelland, S. W. Benson, Joseph 
D. Monell, Jr., L. G. Fisher, T. H. Fellows, and John Hackett, were 
appointed to secure money wherewith to build the road. The road 
was to be built from Kenosha, Wis., to Beloit, Wis., and thence to "con- 
nect with any other road running from Rock River to the Mississippi 
River." 

KENOSHA & BELOIT RAILROAD 

In the American Railway Times of February 21, 1854, we find the 
following editorial: 

" A writer in the Kenosha Telegraph says that at a special meeting of directors of 
the Kenosha & Beloit Railroad Company, held on the 10th hist., an arrangement was 
made with the contractors to put 250 men upon the road at once, and to continue them 
at the grading until the first of May, at which time it is not doubted the section between 
the lake and Fox River will be ready for the iron. He also states that favorable arrange- 
ments have been made for the iron, and that the cars will be running to Fox River early 
in the summer. We congratulate our Kenosha neighbors on the progress that has 
been made in carrying out the enterprise which they look to as the means of permanent 
prosperity." 

A law of Wisconsin of March 13, 1S55, permitted the company to 
change its name to that of the Kenosha & Rock River or to that of the 
Kenosha & Mississippi Railroad Company, and another of March 2, 1857, 
authorized it to consolidate with the Kenosha & Rockford Railroad 
of Illinois. The Kenosha & Rockford and the Rockford & Mississippi 
railroads were also incorporated by the State of Illinois. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 39 

On January 20, 1857, the Legislature of Illinois granted a charter 
to the Kenosha & Rockford Railroad Company, and appointed the fol- 
lowing persons to secure subscriptions to its capital stock: John M. 
Capron, John Cornell, Jason Marsh, Robert P. Lane, Chester C. Briggs, 
Agbert Ayer, Wm. B. Ogden, George Haskell, Chas. H. Spafford, Jesse 
Blinn, Thomas Paul, John Bradley, David S. Penfield, Anson S. Miller, 
and Seely Perry. The company was to build a railroad from "Hebron 
or Richmond, in McHenry County * * * thence to Chemung, and 
thence to Rockford." 

In March, 1857, the two Kenosha and Rockford railroads were con- 
solidated under the name of the Kenosha, Rockford & Rock Island 
Railroad Company. In time this company became bankrupt, and 
was reorganized and then consolidated with the Dixon, Rockford & 
State Line Railroad, and was, on January 16, 1864, named the Dixon, 
Rockford & Kenosha Railway. It was soon completed from Kenosha to 
Rockford, seventy-two miles, where it formed a junction with the Galena 
& Chicago Union Railroad. To prevent the Kenosha & Rockford Com- 
pany from falling into the then unfriendly hands of the Galena & Chicago 
Union Company, it was purchased by the Chicago & North-Western 
Company, and paid for by giving its owners 14,000 shares of the com- 
mon stock of the purchasing company, and was consolidated, in 1864, 
with the Chicago & North- Western Railway Company, and was there- 
after operated as its Kenosha Division. 

The board of directors and the principal officers of the Chicago & 
North- Western Company the first year that saw the completion of the 
road as originally planned were as follows: 

Directors: W. B. Ogden, Chicago; Geo. Smith, Chicago; P. H. Smith, 
Appleton; M. C. Darling, Fond du Lac; A. L. Pritchard, Watertown; 
J. J. R. Pease, Janesville; W. A. Booth, New York; Lowell Holbrook, 
New York; David Dows, New York; C. S. Seyton, New York; H. H. 
Boody, New York; Austin Baldwin, New York; and G. M. Bartholomew, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Officers: W. B. Ogden, president; P. H. Smith, vice-president; 
Geo. L. Dunlap, superintendent; G. P. Lee, treasurer; J. R. Young, 
secretary. 

In 1862 the Lake Forwarding Company (the name afterward was 
changed to the Green Bay Transit Company) was incorporated to put 
steamers on Green Bay and run between the city of Green Bay and 
Little Bay de Noquet, from which point the Peninsula Railroad was 
to run to Marquette, Mich. Three magnificent steamers were ulti- 
mately put on this route, viz., the Sarah Van Epps, the George L. Dunlap, 
and the Saginaw, and continued in the service until the railroad was 
extended in 1872 from Fort Howard (Green Bay) to Escanaba. Before 
the completion of the road north from this Little Bay de Noquet stages 
were run to Marquette by the Lake Forwarding Company. This year 
Chas. S. Tappen was appointed general freight agent, and E. De Witt 
Robinson general passenger agent, of the North-Western Company, 
and they were the first persons who held these titles on that road. 
The annual report for this fiscal year said: "The total capital of the 
company amounts to $30,514,000"; of this $10,093,000 was bonds, 
$8,430,000 preferred stock, and $11,990,500 common stock. The road's 



40 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

earnings for the year ending March 31, 1863, were $1,083,054, and it 
owned thirty-six locomotives and 728 cars. 

It might be interesting to know that before the above-mentioned 
"preferred stock" could be issued the Legislature of Wisconsin was 
obliged to pass a specific law to grant the privilege. This year the North- 
western made a survey for a railroad from Madison, the capital of Wis- 
consin, to Winona, Minn. Before the time arrived for the issue of the 
fifth annual report of the North-Western Company, the great con- 
solidation with the Galena Company was well under way, and hence 
no report was issued. 

THE PENINSULA RAILROAD 

To secure the business of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, The 
Peninsula Railroad Company was organized in 1S62 by W. K. Ogden, 
P. H. Smith, C. T. Harvey, Jno. R. Young, J. S. Reed, N. B. Kidder, 
and N. E. Piatt, with P. H. Smith as president; C. J. Harvey vice- 
president; J. R. Jones, treasurer,, and N. E. Piatt, secretary, and was 
authorized by the Legislature of Michigan to build a railroad from 
Escanaba, Mich., on Little Bay de Xoquet, to Marquette, Mich., on 
Lake Superior. Work was commenced in 1863, and the road was com- 
pleted to the Jackson Mines, at the village of Negaunee, Mich., where 
(twelve miles from Marquette) it formed a junction with the Marquette, 
Houghton & Ontonagon Railroad. In October, 1864, the Peninsula 
Railroad was consolidated with the Chicago & North-Western Railway, 
and was named "The Peninsula Division." 

THE WINONA & ST. PETER RAILROAD COMPANY 
On March 3, 1855, the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of 
Minnesota incorporated The Transit Railroad Company and named the 
following as the then stockholders, viz.: Chas. W. Borup, Abram M. 
Fridly, H. M. Sibley, Harry McKinty, Benjamin Thompson, Geo. H. 
Sanborn, Henry D. Huff, Lorenzo D. Smith, A. G. Chat-field, S. M. Lord, 
W. A. Jones, Byron Kilborn, Orrin Smith, H. J. Hilbert, L. B. Hodges. 
David Olmstead, Orlando Stevens, and E. D. Clinton, and authorized 
them and their successors to build a railroad from Winona "westwardly 
by the most feasible and practicable route to St. Paul or some point on 
the Minnesota River; thence to intersect any railroad that may here- 
after be constructed from Lake Superior or the Mississippi River to or 
towards the Territory of Washington," and also "to extend * * * 
such railroad from its junction with the Minnesota River to such point 
as they may deem proper on the line which may be adopted and estab- 
lished by the Minnesota Western Railroad Company," and also "to 
such point as they may deem proper on the line * * * of The 
Lake Superior, Puget Sound & Pacific Railroad Company, * * * 
provided the point of intersection * * * shall not be east of the 
meridian of the mouth of the Blue Earth River." The capital stock 
was fixed at $5,000,000. But little work was done under the charter. 
The company could not procure money in the East. There was none 
to be had in the West, and it was soon seen that the road must be aban- 
doned. To prevent this and to aid this and other companies like it 
that had been incorporated by the territorial authorities to build rail- 
roads in the then Territory, a large issue of bonds was authorized by the 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 41 

Legislature. These bonds were loaned to the railroad companies under 
contracts that obligated the roads to pay the interest on the bonds 
as it became due, and to pay off the principal of the bonds when they 
matured. In default of either of these provisions the roads were to be 
sold under the contract. 

This company, with many others of the (now) State, could not pay 
the interest on the bonds it had borrowed from the State, and conse- 
quently it was sold at auction on May 22, 1SG0, and bought in by 
the Governor for the benefit of the State and it thus became a State 
railroad. The State did not want it, and could not go on and finish it, 
nor did it wish to operate it if it was constructed. Hence, in March, 
1861, the Legislature, by act, granted and transferred whatever rights 
and interests the State had in the road to Orville Clark, Abraham Wing, 
John W. Kirk, Robert Higham, W. H. Smith, Nelson P. Stewart, and 
B. W. Perkins, and by this act incorporated The Winona, St. Peter & 
Missouri River Railroad Company. 

This corporation did not succeed in building the road, and as a result, 
by the act of the Legislature of the State of Minnesota of March 10, 1862, 
the grant, with all the rights pertaining thereto, was transferred to 
William Lamb, S. S. L'Hommedieu, J. W. Kirk, Herman Gebhart, and 
H. C. Stimson, and who were declared to be a body corporate under the 
name of The Winona & St. Peter Railroad Company. 

The above-named persons formed the first board of directors of the 
newly-named company. Finally, to this company a valuable grant of 
land was made by the State, and that in the end became the potent 
element that caused money to be forthcoming to build the road. After 
many trials and as many failures, D. N. Barney & Co. (the firm consisted 
of D. N. Barney, Jesse Hoyt, Angus Smith, William G. Fargo, and 
others) advanced money to build the first 105 miles of the road westward 
from Winona. Ultimately the entire property passed into their hands. 
On October 31, 1867, D. N. Barney & Co. sold all of their rights to the 
Chicago & North- Western Railway Company, and George L. Dunlap 
was eletted president of the corporation. 

THE LA CROSSE, TREMPEALEAU & PRESCOTT RAILROAD 

By act of the Legislature of Wisconsin on March 6, 1857, a charter 
was granted to a company, under the above name, to locate and build a 
railroad from La Crosse, Wis., via Trempealeau and Fountain City to 
Prescott, Wis. P. V. Wise, 0. T. Maxon, T. B. Wilson, David Noggle, 
Charles McClure, Edmund Bishop, H. D. Huff, Samuel D. Hastings, 
George Batchelder, George Gale, and D. D. Cameron were the first board 
of directors of the company. At the time D. N. Barney & Co. agreed 
to sell to the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company their rights in 
and to the Winona & St. Peter Railroad, they owned a majority of the 
stock of the La Crosse, Trempealeau & Prescott Company and also sold 
it to the North-Western Company. 

Immediately after its purchase by the North-Western Company the 
Winona & St. Peter road was pushed forward, and under its corporate 
name and under other corporate names the road was extended to the 
Missouri River, opposite Fort Pierre, in the then Territory of Dakota, 
and at what is now Pierre, the capital of South Dakota. Several branch 



,42 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

lines were soon built from the main line to various points in Min- 
nesota and Dakota. By the consolidation of the Winona & St. 
Peter Company these became a part of the Chicago & North-Western 
Railway proper. 

THE CHICAGO & MILWAUKEE RAILROAD 

The Legislature of Illinois, by act of February 17, 1851, incorporated 
the Illinois Parallel Railroad Company, with power to build a railroad 
from Chicago contiguous to the shore of Lake Michigan, via Waukegan, 
in Lake County, Illinois, to the Illinois-Wisconsin State line; and David 
Ballantine, David Cary. W. G. Smith, D. 0. Dickinson, E. D. Ely, A. 
B. Coates, W. C. Tiffany, D. S. Dewey, John C. Clarkson, H. W. Blod- 
gett, R. L. Dodge, H. Swan, and H. W. Dorrett were, by this act, 
appointed commissioners to secure subscriptions to the capital stock of 
the company. 

The Green Bay, Milwaukee & Chicago Railroad Company was by the 
Legislature of Wisconsin, by act of March 13, 1851, empowered to locate 
and build a railroad from Milwaukee, Wis., to Racine and Kenosha, 
and to a point on the southern line of the State of Wisconsin between 
the Fox River and Lake Michigan, and also from Milwaukee, via Grafton 
and Cedarburg, or both, to Port Washington, Sheboygan, Manitowoc, 
and Depere, to a convenient point at Green Bay in the county of Brown. 
James H. Rogers, Truman W. Wright, Daniel H. Chandler, John Bullen, 
Levi Blossom, Thomas S. Stoddard, Thomas Hood, Thomas P. Williams, 
Samuel Hall, Philo White, William Teall, P. T. Johnson, Frederick 
Hilgen, Moses Kneeland, A. P. Lyman, E. F. Cook, George Reed, K. K. 
Jones, Henry S. Beard, and David M. Lay were named in the act as 
incorporators of the road. 

On March 4, 1852, this company was, by the Legislature of Wisconsin, 
authorized to extend the road "to some point on Lake Superior or to 
Minnesota Territory," and also to connect its road with any railroad 
company or companies in the State of Illinois, or to become part owner 
or lessee of any railroad in said State," and also to become part owner 
or lessee of any road in Wisconsin. 

The Legislature of Wisconsin, on May 6, 1857, authorized the road 
to change its name to that of the Milwaukee & Chicago Railroad Com- 
pany. The Chicago & Milwaukee and the Milwaukee & Chicago com- 
panies were consolidated June 1, 1863, under the name of the Chicago 
A: Milwaukee Railroad Company. The total capital stock was fixed 
at $2,250,000, and the bonds were $1,749,800. The consolidated road 
began business with eleven locomotive engines and 219 cars. The 
following were its first directors and officers after the consolida- 
tion: 

Directors: Alexander Mitchell, E. K. Rogers, W. S. Gurnee, E. S. 
Wadsworth, S. C. Baldwin, S. Witt, Julius Wadsworth, Ed. Weston, 
and Fred Schuchardt. 

Officers: Alexander Mitchell, president; E. K. Rogers, vice-president; 
A. S. Downs, secretary and treasurer; S. C. Baldwin, superintendent. 

The road was finished from Chicago to Waukegan in 1S54, and the 
first regular train reached Waukegan on December 19, 1854. The road 
was completed through to Milwaukee in 1855. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 43 

JUDGE HENRY W. BLODGETT 

This eminent jurist was a trusted adviser of the directors and .officers 
of the road for many years. To him more than to any other person credit 
is due for bringing about the union of the two properties that formed the 
through line between Chicago and Milwaukee. One who in those days 
knew him well says: 

"His first railroad work was for the Chicago & Milwaukee Railway Company, for 
that half of the company which built the road from Chicago up to the Wisconsin State 
line; a Milwaukee company built the road from that city down to the Illinois State line. 
After two or three years of this double operating the companies united under new 
charters obtained from the two States respectively. Mr. Blodgett drafted and engi- 
neered the necessary bill through the Illinois Legislature, and the late Perry H. Smith, 
then a member of the Wisconsin Legislature and afterward a prominent railroad man, 
attended to the passing of the bill through the Wisconsin Legislature. Now it may be 
worth the saying that the first time the present writer saw Mr. Blodgett was on the 
occasion of the formal union of the two halves of the Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad, 
which took place on the State line in the summer of 1S63. The event was thought to 
be one of very great importance and the leading men of the two cities were invited to 
witness the ceremony, and many of them attended. The most distinguished person on 
the grounds was Stephen A. Douglas— he and his young and beautiful wife. The retir- 
ing president, H. W. Blodgett, of the Chicago half of the road, made a little speech and 
was followed in a short address by the president of the Milwaukee half of the road, and 
then Senator Douglas delivered a more lengthy speech, taking for his subject the mani- 
fest destiny of the Northwest to become the dominant section of the entire country. 
Chicago was to be the greatest city on the continent and Milwaukee was to be a good 
second. 

Mr. Blodgett, in the constituting of the one railroad company in the manner now 
just described, was faithful to his own town of Waukegan. He secured a continuance 
of a previously existing arrangement whereby all passenger trains should make five- 
minute stops at the Waukegan station. This advertised the importance of the place 
to all travelers that way, and, besides, there was in the station a very good luncheon 
always ready, and best of all, as many thought, the excellent Waukegan ale of that day 
was drawn fresh and foaming to all imbibing comers." 

All of this was true, and is now quoted to show the relations that 
existed in those days between Judge Blodgett, the people along the line, 
and the railroad management. 

The Milwaukee road came under the management of the Chicago & 
North-Western Railway Company, by perpetual lease, May 2, 1866. 
Ultimately it was bought by and consolidated with the Chicago & North- 
western Railway Company. Mr. M. L. Sykes at this time became an 
officer of the North-Western Company, and for many years was its vice- 
president, secretary, and treasurer, with office in New York City. 

As a justification for this purchase, the directors of the Chicago & 
North-Western reported to its stockholders as follows: 

" To carry out and perfect the plans of this company for securing greater cer- 
tainty of earnings and more economy in the management of their roads, to the 
mutual advantage of the people using them and the parties owning them, and not 
with any blind and stupid desire of impossible monopoly, as has sometimes been 
maliciously asserted, the board of directors found it necessary to secure a controlling 
interest in the stock of the Chicago & Milwaukee road, the only remaining line in 
competition with the roads of this company, in order to secure to that road and to 
the roads of this company fair earnings, and to prevent the possibility of such an 
unwise and injurious competition as has previously existed between the Galena 
and North-Western roads ***** 

" Had this company failed in effecting this protection against undue competi- 
tion, and had the undue competition apprehended with the Chicago & Milwaukee 
road, in connection with the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, now forming with it 
a continuous line to the Mississippi at La Crosse, occurred, this company might 



44 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

have felt obliged, in self-defense and protection, and in order to secure a connection 
with the Upper Mississippi, an object and end which in that case would have 
become necessary and indispensable to their business and prosperity, to construct 
a line of road, already carefully surveyed and estimated, from Madison to the 
Mississippi River at Winona, above La Crosse, at an expense of about $6,000,000; 
and thus creating three lines of road to the Upper Mississippi, at the great addi- 
tional cost to this company, and seriously affecting unfavorably the Milwaukee 
<fe St. Paul and the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien roads, which roads are as yet 
fully equal to all the business of that region, and which roads, with proper running 
relations and connections with the roads of this company (which it is hoped may, 
ere long, be permanently established and agreed upon), can, with this company, 
largely profit by the organization and plans of this company as now established. 
* + **#*% * 

" Under these circumstances the prospect of triumphant success in competition 
was resigned for the wiser and more prudent policy of liberal cooperation." 

THE GREAT CONSOLIDATION AGAIN 

We have now carried the original Chicago & North-Western Com- 
pany down to the consolidation with the Galena company. Immedi- 
ately after this consolidation was perfected on June 3, 1864, the fol- 
lowing persons were placed in charge of the consolidated property: 

Directors: W. B. Ogden, Chicago, 111.; P. H. Smith, Chicago, 111.; 
G. L. Dimlap, Chicago, 111.; J. B. Turner, Chicago, 111.; W. H. Ferry, 
Chicago, 111.; J. J. R. Pease, Janesville, Wis.; A. L. Pritchard, Water- 
town, Wis.; Thos. D. Robertson, Rockford, 111.; G. M. Bartholomew. 
Hartford, Conn.; S. J. Tilden, New York; W. A. Booth, New York; 
H. A. Boody, New York; L. Holbrook, New York; J. D. Fish, New 
York; J. W. El well, New York; John M. Burke, New York, and Benjamin 
Nathan, New York. 

Officers: W. B. Ogden, president; P. H. Smith, vice-president; Jas. 
R. Young, secretary; J. B. Redfield, assistant secretary; George P. Lee, 
treasurer; G. L. Dunlap, superintendent; J. H. Howe, general solicitor; 
C. B. Talcott, chief engineer; C. S. Tappan, general freight agent; B. F. 
Patrick, general passenger agent. 

THE ROAD AFTER THE CONSOLIDATION 

The merging of the properties we have been describing entailed much 
more work than the simple transfer of the capital stock. Everything 
connected with the operation and management of the property had to 
be brought under a uniform system. It took nearly two years to do 
this. The seventh annual report was not published at the usual time, 
but in August, 1867, the report came out as the report for the "seventh 
and eighth fiscal years." The sixth annual report was really the first 
annual report of the consolidated road. All future reports followed 
the numbering of these, and, hence, really date from the beginning of 
the old North-Western Company, and not from that of the consolidated 
company. From this time on we will treat the case chronologically 
and from the annual reports. 

EIGHTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1866, to May 31, 1867 

The' president advised the stockholders that, during the term that 
ended May, 1867, the entire capital stock of the Green Bay Transit 
Company (of which mention has already been maxie) had been pur- 
chased so that the North-Western Company could have a perfect and 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 45 

controllable connection between its Wisconsin and Peninsula divisions, 
and that two more steamers had been bought and placed in service on 
Green Bay to run between Green Bay City and Escanaba. 

In this annual report of the North- Western road the stockholders 
were advised of the construction, by other companies, of many lines of 
road that it was hoped would prove valuable feeders to their road. One 
of these was the "Sioux City Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad," 
which was projected to be built from Sioux City, Iowa, "to some point 
on the Union Pacific Railroad icest of Omaha." According to the plan 
that had been adopted by its projectors, in place of building it according 
to its original charter, it was now to be built along the east bank of the 
Missouri River to a junction with the North- Western road near "St. 
John's Station, Iowa." This station is now known as Missouri Valley. 
This road was expected to bring to the North-Western road a large trade 
from "Dacotah and the Upper Missouri River," as well as from "Fort 
Benton and the Montana region," as Sioux City was to be "the steam- 
boat point of departure" for these far-off regions! 

In this report the stockholders were told of the building of a railroad 
southward from Council Bluffs along the east bank of the Missouri River, 
and also the chartering by Congress of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

In April, 1867, the North-Western road was completed and opened 
to Council Bluffs, Iowa, 491 miles west of Chicago. This was the first 
railroad connection with the Union Pacific Railroad. A car ferry was 
placed in service by the North-Western Company across the Missouri 
River, so that the construction material for the Union Pacific road could 
be carried without transfer from Chicago to the exact point on that line 
where it was to be used. This connection proved to be of inestimable value 
to the Union Pacific road and hastened by many months, if not by many 
years, the completion of that road. Previous to the formation of this 
connection all of the construction material had been hauled by teams. 

NINTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1867, to May 31, 1868 

In this report we find Henry Keep as president. The president 
reports the purchase from "D. N. Barney and his associates" of all of 
their interests in the Winona & St. Peter Railroad. It was then built 
105 miles westward from Winona. The purchase also included all their 
interests in the La Crosse, Trempealeau & Prescott Railroad. The 
length of line operated by the North-Western Company at this time 
was 1,154 miles. 

TENTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1868, to May 31, 1869 

The gross earnings for the year were $13,941,343.19, and this was 
vastly more than the road had ever before earned in any one year. 
This year two dividends of 5 per cent each were paid to the stockholders. 
Besides the completion of the Sioux City & Pacific Railroad this 
report does not announce anything important. Before the report was 
issued, but while it was still in the printer's hands, the stockholders 
were surprised by the death of the president, Henry Keep, which 
occurred in July, 1869. 

Capitalists in Holland had now become heavy investors in the stock 
and bonds of the road, and were therefore given recognition in the 
4 



46 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



directory by the election as directors of A. G. Dulman of New York 
and J. L. Ten Have Frzn of Amsterdam, Holland. 

ELEVENTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1869, to May 31, 1870 

This year it was arranged to classify the directory into three classes, 
so that the first class would serve one year, the second class two years, 
and the third class three years, and that thereafter each class should 
serve three years. This classification was effected during the thirteenth 
fiscal year. Only sixteen miles of road, viz., from Waseca to Janesville, 
Minn., were built by the company this year. The Union Pacific Railroad 
was reported as finished through from Omaha, Neb., to Ogden, Utah, 
in the fall of 1869. 

TWELFTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1870, to May 31, 1871 

In this term a charter in the interest of the North-Western road 
was procured from the Legislature of Wisconsin to build a connecting 
road between the northern end of the Beloit & Madison Railroad at 
Madison, and the eastern end of the La Crosse, Trempealeau & Prescott 
Railroad. The road so chartered was given the corporate name of 
"The Baraboo Air Line Railroad," with the following incorporators: 
Jonas Narracong, John B. Gwinnell, C. D. Huff, John F. Smith, Jos. 
F. Sandford, Jos. Mackev, Moses Young, Chas. H. Williams, Terrell 
Thomas, T. D. Lang, R. M. Strong, and B. F. Mills. 

As soon as the legal steps could be taken it was consolidated with the 
Beloit & Madison Railroad, and then that consolidated company was 
consolidated with the Chicago & North-Western corporation. Steps 
were at once taken to construct the link, of about 126 miles, that was 
required to form a through line from Chicago, via Madison, to La Crosse 
and Winona, Minn. In the charter of the Baraboo Air Line road was a 
provision for a branch line "if desired, to Tomah, where connection can 
be effected with the West Wisconsin Railroad, now nearly completed, 
and thereby a new route be opened to St. Paul and the lines of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad." 

The Winona & St. Peter road this year was finished to St. Peter, 
Minn., 140 miles from Winona. A branch line 3^ miles long was also 
built from the main line into the city of Mankato. A short line, 2h 
miles, was also built from Geneva, 111., to St. Charles, 111., and thus again 
gave to the city of St. Charles railroad facilities that it had not had since 
the abandonment of "The St. Charles Branch road" of the early days 
of the Galena company, whose story has already been told. 

IOWA CENTRAL AIR LINE RAILROAD UNDER CONTRACT 
As an illustration of railroad "booming" in 1S54, we copy the follow- 
ing from the columns of the Savannah (111.) Register: 

" It is a source of gratification to us to announce to our readers the fact that 
this road was put under contract on the 12th inst. A responsible company, repre- 
sented by Messrs. Swain and Gibbs, have taken the whole line, we believe, from 
Sabula to Cedar Rapids. The company have taken $500,000 stock — the remain- 
ing $500,000 having been taken by private individuals and Linn County, in her 
corporate capacity. Despite the exertions of some portions of Jackson County to 
ruin this project by influencing the vote to take $100,000 stock in county bonds,, 
the road has been profitably let, and will be commenced as soon as the surveys 
shall be completed. It is thought the work will be opened about March 1st. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 47 

Some doubts were entertained that the required amount to put the work under 
contract could be raised, when G. S. Hubbard, Esq., well known as a director in 
the Chicago & Mississippi Air Line Company, came forward and subscribed $100,000. 
This shows what confidence is entertained by eastern capitalists of the importance 
of the Iowa Central Air Line. Something like $15,000 were subscribed in Maquo- 
keta, on Thursday last, in a few hours. It is difficult to realize the importance 
of this work, both to our own road and county, and also to Iowa. Extending 
westward from the Mississippi, through the wealthiest and most productive coun- 
ties in the State, it forms one continuous ' Air Line' between the Great Lakes and 
the Missouri River— for it is the intention to push this road as speedily as possible 
to that point. Doubtless ere the cars reach Cedar Rapids the whole distance from 
that point to Council Bluffs will be surveyed, ready for contract. Thus a great 
feeder will be opened to the road from Savannah to Chicago— one that will be the 
most important, because the quickest and the one that brings the most trade. 
Linn County is probably one of the wealthiest in the State, having taken $200,000 
stock in this road, with the assurance that $100,000 more could be raised if neces- 
sary. And all the country from the Mississippi to the Missouri rivers will soon be 
as wealthy and populous as this county. It only needs a few years' increase equal 
to that of the last two years to insure it." 

IOWA MIDLAND RAILWAY 

Many years before the period about which we are now writing The 
Iowa Central Air Line Railroad Company had been chartered by the 
State of Iowa to build a railroad from the Mississippi River westward. 
When it was found that money could not be secured to build the road 
under the charter, the Mississippi, Maquoketa & North-Western Railroad 
Company was incorporated as its successor. Substantially nothing was 
done under this second charter, but in 1870 the Iowa Midland Railroad 
Company was organized and obtained possession of rights and prop- 
erties of the Iowa Central Air Line and its immediate successor, and at 
once began to build a railroad from Lyons, Iowa, to Anamosa, seventy- 
five miles, where a junction was to be formed with the Dubuque & South- 
western Railway. It was thought best that the North- Western Company 
should control this property, and consequently it purchased a majority 
of the capital stock of the company and then leased the completed part 
of the road and opened it to Maquoketa in October, 1870, and to Anamosa 
in December of the same year. 

ELGIN & STATE LINE RAILROAD 

Many years before 1871 what was known as the Lake Geneva extension 
of the above-named road was built to the town of Geneva in the State 
of Wisconsin and was laid with strap rail and was operated in connection 
with the Galena company's P^lgin & State Line division. "The rails 
were long since removed and the old grading and right of way suffered 
to remain unoccupied." It now seemed desirable to re-occupy these 
rights and they were purchased and a company in the interest of the 
North- Western Company was formed under the name of The State Line 
& Union Railroad, and under it the road was extended into the village 
of Lake Geneva in the fall of 1871. 

In a foot-note to this report it is stated that fifty-two miles of the 
gap that existed between Green Bay and the Menominee River had been 
put under contract and that the rest of the line was being surveyed with 
a view to its construction at an early day. It also stated that the Madison 
extension had been finished twenty miles to Lodi; that the Lake Geneva 
line was completed, and that thirty miles more of the Winona & St. 



48 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

Peter line had been contracted for, and would be ready for the rails in 
a short time. 

THIRTEENTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1871, to May 31, 1872 

In this report, we have an account of the great losses the road 
suffered from the Chicago fire, which occurred only five months after the 
close of the previous fiscal year and which so deranged all business 
as to very largely affect the company's earnings, and to stop, for a 
time, all but the absolutely essential expenditure of money on the prop- 
erty. "New blood" began to be injected into the management this 
year, and Judge James H. Howe took charge as general manager, and on 
March 1, 1872, Marvin Hughitt assumed the office and duties of general 
superintendent. To give a basis for judging in the future the ultimately 
resulting effect of this "new blood," the following is submitted: 

The gross earnings for this year were $11,402,161 

The total capital stock out was 35,878,643 

The total bonded debt amounted to 16 251,000 

The road owned of locomotive engines 269 

Of cars of all kinds it owned 6,343 

The road in the year carried 2,224,705 passengers at an average rate 
of 3.28 cents per mile; and 2,510,016 tons of freight at an average of 
2.61 cents per ton per mile. Its total mileage, not including that of the 
Winona & St. Peter Company, was 1,382 miles. 

As very important changes were impending in the ownership of the 
road and in its directory, we give the directors and officers as they stood 
before the changes were made. These directors were elected by the 
stockholders on June 1, 1871. 

Directors: John M. Burke, New York; A. G. Dulman, New York; 
Geo. S. Scott, New York; M. L. Sykes, Jr., New York; Charles R. Marvin, 
New York; Harvey Kennedy, New York; A. B. Baylis, New York; 
David Dows, New York; R. P. Flower, New York; Francis H. Tows, 
New York; Wm. L. Scott, Erie; Milton Courtright, Erie; John F. Tracy, 
Chicago; Henry H. Porter, Chicago; Wm. H. Ferry, Chicago; B. F. Allen, 
Des Moines, Iowa; J. L. Ten Have Frzn, Amsterdam, Holland. 

Officers: John F. Tracy, president; M. L. Sykes, Jr., vice-president; 
Albert L. Pritchard, secretary and treasurer; James H. Howe, general 
manager; Marvin Hughitt, general superintendent; E. H. Johnson, chief 
engineer; B. C. Cook, general solicitor; M. M. Kirkman, local treasurer; 
J. B. Redfield, assistant secretary and auditor; R. W. Hamer, purchasing 
agent; C. C. Wheeler, general freight agent; H. P. Stanwood, general 
ticket agent. 

Under the authority given by the Legislatures of Wisconsin and 
Illinois, mention of which has already been made, the following classifi- 
cation of directors was made by the stockholders at the annual meeting 
of June 1, 1871: Harvey Kennedy, Wm. L. Scott, Geo. S. Scott, Milton 
Courtright, John B. Turner, and J. L. Ten Have Frzn were elected to 
hold their offices until the first Thursday of June, 1872; the next six — 
A. G. Dulman, John M. Burke, Chas. R. Marvin, R. P. Flower, M. L. 
Sykes, Jr., and H. H. Porter — were to hold office until the first Thursday 
in June, 1873; and the five following — John F. Tracy, A. B. Baylis, 
David Dows, Francis H. Tows, and Geo. L. Dunlap — were to hold office 
for a term of three years, or until June, 1S74. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 49 

From that time to the present this system of classification has been 
adhered to. 

ALBERT KEEP, DIRECTOR AND PRESIDENT 

Mr. Albert Keep of Chicago was by the stockholders of the company 
elected a director thereof on June 5, 1873, and on June 19, 1873, he was by 
the directors elected president. He served as president until midsummer 
of 1887, when he resigned and was succeeded as president by Mr. Marvin 
Hughitt. Mr. Keep is still a director of the company. Under the 
management of these two men it will be found the road advanced from 
being not much more than "a streak of rust" when they took hold of 
it until it has come to be the leading railroad of the West. 

FOURTEENTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1872, to May 31, 1873 

At the close of this fiscal year Mr. Albert Keep made his first annual 
report as president, and from it we learn the extension of the road from 
Fort Howard (Green Bay), 115 miles, was finished to Escanaba and opened 
on December 31, 1872. The Stanwood & Tipton line, 8^ miles, and 
the St. Charles Branch, extending from Geneva to Batavia, were built and 
opened for traffic this year. The crowded condition of the company's 
shops in Chicago, and the absolute need of more shop room, induced the 
company this year to buy 240 acres of open ground just west of the city 
limits, and ultimately to consolidate thereon all of its Chicago shops. 
A line of road, in the interest of the Chicago & North-Western Company, 
but under the corporate title of the 

MILWAUKEE & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY 

and with the following named incorporators, viz., Charles J. L. Meyer, 
William H. Hiner, Robert A. Baker, Irenus K. Hamilton, Benjamin F. 
More, William A. Knapp, William H. Wells, Edwin H. Galloway, James 
Coleman, James M. Gillett, Uriah D. Mihills, John S. McDonald, Paul 
Hauser, William H. Reupping, J. C. Pettibone, Aaron Walters, Henry 
Hayes, Charles D. Gage, Jacob Haesley, Mathias Altenhofen, Henry 
Backhaus, Robert R. Price, John Reisse, Albert Sender, Isaac N. Frisby, 
Maxon Hirsch, L. F. Frisby, Angus Smith, John Plankinton, Guido 
Pfister, E. D. Holton, Henry L. Palmer, Christian Young, John A. 
Robinson, and John Nazro, was organized and was, by act of the Legis- 
lature of Wisconsin, taking effect February 25, 1871, declared to be a 
body corporate under the above-named title, and was authorized to con- 
struct a line of railroad from the city of Milwaukee through the village 
of West Bend to the city of Fond du Lac, and "thence northwesterly 
to some point on Lake Superior" that might be selected by the com- 
pany. On May 3, 1872, the corporate name of the company was changed 
to that of the North- Western Union Railway Company. Three very 
large brick freight depots and two large grain elevators were built in 
Chicago this year by the company, to take the place of others that were 
destroyed in the great Chicago fire. 

THE WEST WISCONSIN RAILWAY 

While at the time we have now reached in this sketch the Chicago 
& North-Western Railway Company had no financial or proprietary 
interest in the West Wisconsin Railway, yet, because they ultimately 



50 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

became intimately connected, it seems fit that the history of that cor- 
poration should have a place here. Through purchases, consolidations, 
and constructions, this road became the basis for the building up of the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

This year the West Wisconsin road was finished through from St. Paul 
to Elroy, and a through passenger and freight line formed, under the name 
of The Elroy Route, by the North-Western and West Wisconsin com- 
panies, and thus gave, for the first time, a competing line of railroad 
from Chicago to St. Paul, and for all the country beyond. The main 
line of the West Wisconsin and its successors may be thought of as the 
half of an arc of a circle. Starting from Elroy, Wis., it curves north- 
westwardly to Hudson and St. Paul, and then round toward the south 
and southwest, via Mankato, Minn., and Sioux City, Iowa, to Omaha, 
Neb. From this rim many branch lines start off at various points and 
run thence to Superior, Wis.; Duluth, Minn.; Blue Earth, Minn.; Pipe- 
stone, Sioux Falls, and Mitchell, S. D., etc., respectively. 

We give a brief chronological history of the beginning and growth 
of what ultimately became, and now is, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneap- 
olis & Omaha Railway. 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE RAILWAY LINES CONSTITUTING THE 

CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & OMAHA 

RAILWAY COMPANY 

THE BEGINNING OF LEGISLATION 

1852 
April 14th: The Legislature of Wisconsin incorporated the La Crosse 
& Milwaukee Railroad Company, and gave it authority to construct a 
railroad from Milwaukee, Wis., to La Crosse. 

1854 
Wisconsin incorporated the Saint Croix & Lake Superior Railroad 
Company. It was authorized by acts of 1857 to receive a conveyance 
from the La Crosse & Milwaukee Railroad Company of the granted lands 
applicable to its line. -\si~z, 

March 2d: The Root River & Southern Minnesota Railroad Com- 
pany was incorporated under a special act of the Legislature of Minne- 
sota, with Edward Thompson, Samuel McPhail, James Smith, Edward 
Bell, Ole Knudson, T. B. Twiford, W. B. Gear, Benjamin Thompson, 
John Looney, Joseph Sovesse, William F. Dunbar, B. Pringle, James 
McCan, H. N. Farnham, W. W. Bennett, Robert H. Shankland, J. S. 
McCuen, David Olmsted, Benjamin F. Brown, Joseph P. Hamelin, H. 
D. Huff, Thomas Foster, Jacob McCrary, and William Bross as incor- 
porators. This company was authorized to build a railroad from Hokah, 
Houston County, Minnesota, westerly to the Missouri River. This year 
the Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad Company, an Iowa corporation, was 
incorporated to build a line from Sioux City toward St, Paul, to the 
State line between Iowa and Minnesota Territory. 

1856 
June 3d: The United States granted lauds to the State of Wisconsin 
to aid in the construction of certain railroads, among them "a railroad 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 51 

from Madison or Columbus, by the way of Portage City, to the St. 
Croix River or Lake, between townships 25 and 31, and from thence to 
the west end of Lake Superior and to Bayfield, six sections in width 
on each side of the road." Wisconsin accepted the grant by act of 
October '8, 1856. 

November 4th: Wisconsin conferred on the La Crosse & Milwaukee 
Railroad Company the power to build a railroad from Madison or Colum- 
bus, by way of Portage City, to the St. Croix River or Lake, between 
townships 25 and 31, and from thence to the west end of Lake Superior 
and to Bavfield, and the lands granted by the act of Congress of June 
3, 1856. 

1857 

March 3d: The United States granted lands to the Territory of Min- 
nesota to aid in the construction of certain railroads, among them one 
"from St. Paul and from St. Anthony, via Minneapolis, to a convenient 
point of junction west of the Mississippi, to the southern boundary of 
the Territory, in the direction of the mouth of the Big Sioux River." 

May 22d: The Root River Valley & Southern Minnesota Railroad 
Company was authorized to build certain lines of railroad, among them 
one from St. Paul and St. Anthony, via Minneapolis, to a point of junc- 
tion at Shakopee City, in the county of Scott, and thence via Belle 
Plaine, Clarksville, Le Sueur, Traverse de Sioux, St. Peter, Kasota, 
Mankato, and South Bend, to the southern boundary of the Territory 
of Minnesota in the direction of the mouth of the Big Sioux River. The 
grant of lands made bj r the United States in aid of the line was conferred 
upon this company by the same act. 

May 23d: Name changed to "Southern Minnesota Railroad Com- 
pany " by act of Legislature. 

1858 
The State of Minnesota loaned its credit to the Southern Minnesota 
by issuing its State bonds, and the railroad company executed a deed 
of trust to the State to secure the payment of the bonds and interest. 

I860 
The Southern Minnesota Railroad Company having defaulted in the 
payment of interest on the State bonds, the State sold the property 
under the deed of trust, and bought the same. The property included 
the land-grant lands and 37^ miles of graded roadbed. The bonds on 
which default was made amounted to $575,000. 

1863 
The Tomah & Lake St. Croix Railroad Company was incorporated 
by William Wilson and William Carson of Dunn County, Joseph G. 
Thorp and Richard F. Wilson of Eau Claire County, Andrew K. Gregg, 
Sr., and Hiram S. Allen of Chippewa County, Augustus Gay lord of Polk 
County N. S. Dunbar and Charles B. Cox of Pierce County, Herman L. 
Humphrey of St. Croix County, Miles D. Prindle of Pepin County, 
George M. Gilkey of Buffalo County, R. C. Field of Trempealeau County, 
Carl C. Pope and William T. Price of Jackson County, Richard Dewhurst 
of Clark County, and C. D. Spaulding of Monroe County, and authorized 
to build a railroad from Tomah, Monroe County, to Lake St. Croix, 



52 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

and the Legislature conferred upon this company the lands pertaining 
to that line, annulling the former grant to the La Crosse & Milwaukee 
Railroad Company. 

1864 

March 4th: Minnesota Valley Railroad Company incorporated by 
Horace Thompson, D. W. Ingersoll, S. W. Farnham, Andrew G. Chat- 
field, Isaac Lincoln, F. A. Donahower, John J. Porter, P. Berkev, H. 
C. Smith, John L. Merriam, F. R. E. Cornell, E. W. Cutter, Eli B. Ames, 
J. S. Letford, William Huey, B. R. Laird, and Isaac Marks. The State 
of Minnesota conveyed the property of the Southern Minnesota Railroad 
Company to the Minnesota Valley Railroad Company. 

May 5th: The United States granted additional lands to the State 
of Wisconsin, ten-mile limits, for the line between Lake St. Croix to 
west end of Lake Superior and to Bayfield. 

March 11th: The St. Croix & Lake Superior Railway Company hav- 
ing failed of performance, the Legislature of Wisconsin conferred the 
lands that pertained to its line upon the North Wisconsin Railway 
Company and the Northern Pacific Air Line Railway Company. 

1865 
The State of Wisconsin conferred upon the Tomah & Lake St. Croix 
Company the lands applicable to its line from those granted to the State 
in 1856 and 1864. The Legislature of Minnesota conferred upon Minne- 
sota Valley Railroad Company the lands granted to the State in 1857 
and 1864, amounting to ten sections per mile. Minnesota Valley Com- 
pany built from Mendota, Minn., to Shakopee, twenty-two miles. The 
rights of the St. Croix & Lake Superior Company, as well as the Tomah 
& Lake St. Croix Company, to the additional lands, were this year con- 
ferred by the Legislature of Wisconsin to the Tomah road. 

1866 
The name of the Tomah & Lake St. Croix Railroad Company was, by 
resolution of the board of directors, changed to West Wisconsin Railway 
Company. The Minnesota Valley was extended from Mendota to West 
St. Paul, six miles; and from Shakopee to Belle Plaine, nineteen miles. 
The State of Iowa conferred on the Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad Com- 
pany the lands granted by the United States in aid of the line from Sioux 
City to south line of Minnesota. 

1S67 
The Minnesota Valley Railroad Company was authorized by the 
Minnesota Legislature to construct a branch from its main line at Hen- 
derson to the west line of the State; also a branch line from Mankato to 
the south line of Faribault County (Elmore Branch). The Minnesota 
Valley was extended from Belle Plaine to Le Sueur, 15.7 miles. 

186S 
The Minnesota Valley road was extended from Le Sueur to St. Peter, 
twelve miles. 

1869 
The Omaha & North-Western Railroad Company organized and 
incorporated by the State of Nebraska to build a line of railroad from 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 53 

Omaha, Neb., to mouth of Niobrara River. The St. Paul, Stillwater & 
Taylors Falls Railroad Company, a Minnesota corporation, was organ- 
ized to build a line of railroad from St. Paul to Taylors Falls by way of 
Stillwater. The name of the Minnesota Valley was changed to St. Paul 
& Sioux City by action of the board of directors. The St. Paul & Sioux 
City and the Minnesota Central united in bridging the Mississippi and 
building into St. Paul, to the location of the present Union Depot. 

1S70 

The West Wisconsin Railway Company's charter was so amended by 
the State of Wisconsin as to authorize it to extend its road to the south 
line of the State. The State granted right of way 100 feet wide, and such 
other lands adjacent to the railroad as might be necessary for railway 
proposed, in event of the company locating its line on lands belonging 
to the State. 

1871 

The North Wisconsin Railway Company was incorporated under the 
General Laws of Wisconsin and authorized to construct a line from St. 
Croix Lake to west end of Lake Superior and to Bayfield. The Minne- 
sota Legislature conferred upon the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls 
Railroad Company the congressional land grant pertaining to its line 
from Stillwater to a point twelve miles westwardly thereof. 

The St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad Company conveyed to the Sioux 
City & St. Paul Railroad Company all the right, title, franchises, and 
land grant of that company pertaining to so much of its railroad as then 
remained to be constructed from St. James, Minn., to the Iowa State line. 

1S72 
The State of Minnesota authorized the West Wisconsin Company to 
build and maintain a bridge over Lake St. Croix, and to exercise in Minne- 
sota all the corporate power and privileges that it enjoyed in Wisconsin. 
The road from Sioux City to St. James was completed by the completion 
of 6.74 miles to Le Mars. From Le Mars to Sioux City is a leased line, 
the Illinois Central Company being the owner of it. 

1S73 

The State of Wisconsin by statute commanded the West Wisconsin 
Railway Company to relay, maintain, and operate its road from Tomah 
to Warren's Mills. 

1S74 

The State of Wisconsin conferred upon the North Wisconsin Railway 
Company the congressional land grant pertaining to its line between 
Lake St. Croix and Bayfield, and in the same act granted to the Northern 
Pacific Air Line Railway Company the lands lying between the point of 
intersection of the branches of said grants, as fixed by the surveys and 
maps on file in the Land Office at Washington, and the west end of Lake 
Superior, which latter grant was in 1882 revoked by the Legislature 
for failure to complete the railway, and conferred upon the Chicago, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. An act was passed by 
the Legislature of Iowa authorizing and directing the Governor to certify 
to the Sioux City & St. Paul Railroad Company all lands then held by 
the State in trust for the benefit of the railroad company. 



54 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

1875 
The Covington, Columbus & Black Hills Railroad Company organized 
and incorporated to build a railroad from Covington, Neb., to the Nio- 
brara River, ami also a lateral branch extending westerly through various 
counties in Nebraska to a point of junction with the Union Pacific 
Railroad. 

1876 

The State of Wisconsin legalized the West Wisconsin Company's line 
from Warren's Mills to Elroy, and the taking up of its track between 
Tomah and Warren's Mills. The St. Paul & Dakota Railroad Company, 
a Minnesota corporation, organized to build a road from some point on 
line of St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad in Nobles County, Minnesota, to 
the west line of the State in Rock County. The name was changed to 
The Worthington cV: Sioux Falls Railroad Company. 

1S7S 
The West Wisconsin Railway Company was purchased after its vir- 
tual bankruptcy, by H. H. Porter, David Dows, and W 7 alston H. Brown, 
who, with others, organized and became incorporated, pursuant to the 
laws of Wisconsin, under the name of Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis 
Railway Company. The Black River Railroad Company organized 
and incorporated to build a line from Merrillan, Wis., to Neillsville. The 
Hudson tx River Falls Railway Company organized and incorporated 
to build a line from Hudson, W T is., to River Falls. The Minnesota & 
Black Hills Railroad Company organized and incorporated to build a 
line from a point on line of St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad Company, in 
Jackson County, Minnesota, northwesterly and westerly through Murray 
and Pipestone counties to west line of State. The Omaha & Northern 
Nebraska Railway Company was organized and incorporated under the 
laws of Nebraska to build a line from Omaha northwesterly to a point 
in Nebraska east of the one hundredth degree of west longitude, and 
thence to Deadwood. The Worthington & Sioux Falls Railroad Com- 
pany, authorized by act of Congress to do so, extended its road to Sioux 
Falls, S. D. The Omaha & Northwestern Railroad sold under fore- 
closure sale to the Omaha & Northern Nebraska Railway Company. 

1879 
The State of Minnesota authorized the Chicago, St. Paul & Minne- 
apolis Railway Company to construct a line from Lake St. Croix to 
Minneapolis. The Eau Claire Railway Company organized and incor- 
porated to build a line from West Eau Claire Depot to southwestern 
limits of city, known as the Shawtown Branch, 2.74 miles. The Menom- 
onie Railway Company incorporated to build a line from Menomonie, 
Wis., to Menomonie Junction, three miles. The Minnesota & Black 
Hills Railroad Company conveyed to the St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad 
Company its railroad, commencing at Heron Lake. Minn., and running 
thence westerly to the western boundary of the State of Minnesota. The 
Omaha & Northwestern Railroad Company conveyed to the Omaha & 
Northern Nebraska its road in Nebraska. The Sioux City & St. Paul 
Company conveyed to the St. Paul & Sioux City Company all its railroad, 
commencing at St. James, Minn., and extending thence to Sioux City, 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 55 

122.7 miles of track. The Sioux City & Nebraska Railroad Company, 
a Nebraska corporation, was organized to build a railroad from a point 
on the Missouri River, opposite or below Sioux City, Iowa, in a southerly 
direction to and into the city of Omaha, with a branch running in a 
westerly direction to the west line of Nebraska. The Worthington *t 
Sioux Falls Railroad Company authorized by Minnesota Legislature to 
build a branch from Luverne, Minn., to Iowa State line. The Worth- 
ington & Sioux Falls Railroad Company was organized and incorporated 
under the laws of Iowa to build a line from a point in Range 45 on State 
line between Iowa and Minnesota southwesterly to a point on the Big 
Sioux River, which line was constructed in part and conveyed to the 
Worthington & Sioux Falls Railroad Company (Doon Branch). The 
Covington, Columbus & Black Hills Railroad purchased by E. F. Drake 
under foreclosure sale and conveyed by him to the Sioux City & Nebraska 
Railroad Company. 

1SS0 

The Chicago, St. Paul & Minneapolis Railway Company and the North 
Wisconsin Railway Company consolidated under the name of Chicago, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. The Chicago, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company acquired the Black River 
Railroad Company, projected from Neillsville to Merrillan. The Hudson 
& River Falls Railway Company conveyed to North Wisconsin Railway 
Company its railroad from Hudson to River Falls, and all right of way 
from River Falls toward Ellsworth. The Omaha & Northern Nebraska 
Railway Company conveyed to the Sioux City & Nebraska Railroad 
Company its railroad from Omaha, Neb., to Oakland, Neb. The St. 
Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls Railroad Company conveyed to the St. 
Paul & Sioux City Railroad Company its railroad from St. Paul to Still- 
water; also the branch to Hudson bridge on Lake St. Croix and the South 
Stillwater branch. The Covington, Columbus & Black Hills road was 
conveyed to the St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad Company. 

1881 
The Chippewa Falls & Northern Railway Company organized and 
incorporated to build a line from Chippewa Falls to junction with Chi- 
cago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway at Chicago Junction, 
Wis. The Cedar Falls & Northern Railway Company organized and 
incorporated to build a line from 3,000 feet west of Chicago, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis & Omaha Railway bridge over Red Cedar River to Cedar 
Falls, Wis. The Eau Claire & Chippewa Falls Railway Company organ- 
ized and incorporated to build a line from Eau Claire to Chippewa 
Falls. The Sioux City & Nebraska Railroad Company conveyed to the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company all of its lines 
in Nebraska, covering the Omaha, Norfolk & Ponca (Niobrara) branches. 
The St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad was conveyed to the Chicago, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

1882 
The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company 
purchased that portion of the Chippewa Falls & Northern Railway 
Company's railroad between Chippewa Falls and Bloomer. The Ashland 



56 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

Railway Company, a Wisconsin corporation, was organized to build 
a railroad from Ashland Junction into and beyond Ashland, Wis. The 
State of Wisconsin revoked the congressional land grant formerly given 
to the Chicago, Portage & Superior Railway Company, and conferred 
it on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

1883 
The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company pur- 
chased that portion of the Chippewa Falls & Northern Railway Com- 
pany's railroad between Bloomer and Chicago Junction. The property 
of Cedar Falls & Northern Railway Company was conveyed to the Me- 
nomonie Railway Company. The Eau Claire & Chippewa Falls Railway 
was conveyed to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway 
Company. The Sioux City & Nebraska Railroad Company conveyed 
to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company its 
line from Wakefield to Hartington, Neb. 

1SS5 
The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company 
acquired the Ashland Railway, running from Ashland to Ashland Junc- 
tion, a distance of about 5+ miles. 

18S6 
The Northeastern Nebraska Railroad Company organized and incor- 
porated to build a railroad from Wayne, Neb., northwesterly through 
certain counties to Niobrara, Neb. The Fairchild & Mississippi Railway 
Company (afterward Sault Ste. Marie & Southwestern Railway Com- 
pany) was organized and incorporated under the laws of Wisconsin to 
build a line from Fairchild, Wis., to some point on the line of the Bur- 
lington & Northern Railroad, in Buffalo County, Wisconsin, with a 
branch line from Fairchild to some point on the line of the Wisconsin 
Central Railroad in Clark or Marathon counties, Wisconsin. 

1S87 
The name of the Fairchild & Mississippi Railway Company was 
changed to the Sault Ste. Marie & Southwestern Railway Company. 

1SS8 
The Northeastern Nebraska Railroad was conveyed to the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

1890 
The Randolph & Northeastern Nebraska Railroad Company, which 
was organized and incorporated to build a railroad from Randolph, 
Neb., to Fort Randolph, S. D., built from Randolph to Bloomfield, a 
distance of twenty-one miles, and conveyed the line to the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

1891 

The Neillsville & Northeastern Railway Company was organized 
and incorporated in 1881 to build a line from Neillsville, Wis., to Wausau, 
Wis., with a branch from some point on said line to Merrill, Wis. The 
stock of this company was secured by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 57 

& Omaha Railway Company in 1887, and the right of way which had 
been acquired by the Neillsville & Northeastern was conveyed to the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company in 1891, 
in which year the road was completed to Marshfield by the last-named 
company. 1S93 

The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company 
acquired the Menomonie Railway. The Sault Ste. Marie & South- 
western Railway was conveyed to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis 
& Omaha Railway Company. The Eau Claire Railway was conveyed 
to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

1895 
The Superior Short Line Railway Company, owning the line from a 
point in the N. W. i of N. W. \, Section 4-48-13 W., Douglas County, 
Wisconsin, to St. Louis bridge, and Superior Short Line Railway Com- 
pany of Minnesota, owning the line from St. Louis bridge to station 
grounds in Duluth, consolidated under name of Superior Short Line 
Railway Company, and latter company conveyed all its lines to the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

1899 
The Watonwan Valley Railway Company was organized and incor- 
porated for the purpose of building a line from Madelia, Minn., to a 
point on the boundary line between the States of Minnesota and Iowa. 
The line was completed to Fairmont, Minn., and conveyed to the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. The Des Moines 
Valley Railway Company of Minnesota was organized and incorporated 
to build a line from a point on the south line of the State at or near 
the southwest corner of Township 101 N., Range 34 W., in a northerly 
or northwesterly direction through the counties of Jackson and Cotton- 
wood to a point of intersection with the railway of the Chicago, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company at or near Bingham Lake 
or Windom; thence in a northwesterly direction through the counties 
of Cottonwood, Murray, and Pipestone to a point on the line bounding 
the State of Minnesota on the west near the north line of Township 107 N. 

1900 
The Des Moines Valley Railroad Company completed its line from 
Bingham Lake to Currie, and conveyed it to the Chicago, St. Paul, 
Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company. 

1901 
The Chippewa Valley & Northwestern Railway Company was organ- 
ized and incorporated under the laws of Wisconsin to build a railroad 
from a point on the line of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha 
Railway in the S. W. \ of Section 29-36-11 W., in Barron County, Wis- 
consin, and thence in a northeasterly direction through Barron County, 
and through the counties of Washburn Sawyer, Ashland, Price, Iron, and 
Vilas, to a connection with the line of railroad of the Chicago & North- 
western Railway in either Iron or Vilas County. The stock of the 
Minnesota & Wisconsin Railroad Company, a line running from Emerald, 
Wis., to Spring Valley, Wis., a distance of 20.65 miles, was acquired 



58 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company, 
and the management of the property assumed by last-named company. 

1902 

The Eau Claire, Chippewa Falls & Northeastern Railway Company, 
a Wisconsin corporation, organized to build a line from a point on the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway in or near Section 
5-28-8 W.. Chippewa County, Wisconsin, in a northeasterly direction to a 
point known as Little Falls, in Section 28-32-6 W., in Chippewa County. 
The Minnesota & Wisconsin Railroad was extended from Spring Valley, 
Wis., to Weston, Wis., a distance of 15.72 miles, and the entire road 
deeded to the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Com- 
pany on June 7, 1902. 

1904 

The Chippewa Valley & Northwestern Railway having been com- 
pleted from Radisson Junction to Winter, a distance of forty-six miles, 
and the Eau Claire, Chippewa Falls & Northeastern Railway having 
been completed from Chippewa Falls to a point four miles east of Han- 
nibal — forty-nine miles — both roads were conveyed to the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway. Ultimately it will be seen 
that the control of this property was purchased by the Chicago & North- 
western Railway Company. *(See page 66 for history of the purchase.) 

FIFTEENTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1873, to May 31, 1874 

From the fifteenth annual report we find the extension of the Baraboo 
Air Line was finished and connected with the La Crosse. Trempealeau 
& Prescott road, and opened for business on September 14, 1873, through 
to Winona, Minn. The North-Western Union road w T as finished 
between Milwaukee and Fond du Lac and opened on September 7, 
1873; and the Winona & St. Peter road was finished to Lake Kampeska, 
on the east bank of the Big Sioux River in Dakota, and was opened by 
an excursion train from Chicago, leaving on Monday, September 15, 
1873. This excursion train carried a large proportion of the leading 
business men of Chicago. On its arrival at Winona, news was received 
of the failure of Jay Cook & Co. This was the beginning of the great 
financial panic of 1873. Filled as the train was with bankers, whole- 
sale merchants, prominent manufacturers, and the great grain dealers 
of the city of Chicago, one can well appreciate the anxiety and alarm 
the news caused. At St. Peter, Minn., that night, another telegram 
was received by one of the excursionists that stated that Chicago was 
again on fire, and that much of the recently rebuilt business part of 
the city had again been destroyed. The train was held at St. Peter until 
the message was found to be untrue. Steps were at once taken to ascer- 
tain who had sent the message that had so cruelly frightened the guests of 
the road, but to this day the guilty party has never been detected. It 
was found the message did not start from Chicago, but was supposed 
to have been sent from Milwaukee, Madison, or St. Paul. It was found 
that it was read as it passed through many of the telegraph offices 
north and west of Madison and before it reached St. Peter, but beyond 
this nothing was ever learned. 

*We are indebted to Captain E. E. Woodman, the Secretary of the Omaha Company, for all of 
the comprenensive details, as to that company, that we have given above. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 59 

The next afternoon on the arrival of the train at Lake Kampeska, 
640 miles northwest of Chicago, the party found buffaloes roaming on 
the prairies there. At this time, now only thirty-one years ago, there 
was scarcely a settler in what now is Central South Dakota. A thin 
fringe of pioneers was to be found along the southern border of the then 
territory along the Missouri River. Western Minnesota also then was 
an almost unknown region. 

To-day, on the actual route of that excursion train, you pass through 
cities, towns, and villages all the way from the Mississippi to the 
Missouri River, and where the buffaloes then grazed are now seen, on 
nearly every quarter section of land, a farm, with its houses, barns, 
orchards, and gardens. Land that then could be had "free for the 
asking" sells for from $50 to $75 per acre, and all this marvelous change 
has been brought about by the building of this railroad. 

A general office building for the use of the company's offices, 60 by 
200 feet, was built during this term by the company on the corner of 
Kinzie and Market streets, in Chicago, at a cost of $123,000, and was 
first occupied on December 1, 1873. The first of the new shops that 
were to fill the recently purchased ground that has been referred to were 
erected this year. 

GRANGER LEGISLATION 

In the period covered by this annual report there was inaugurated, 
by the politicians, a policy that has proved to be extremely disastrous 
to railroad property, not only as to that owned by the Chicago & North- 
western Company, but also to that owned by all the railroad companies 
in the United States. It was what has since been called "Granger 
legislation." Its effects have been so "repugnant to all of the princi- 
ples of equity" as to "destroy our credit and reputation abroad, and 
peril our safety at home," and hence it deserves a mention in these 
pages; it marked an epoch in the life of the corporation. Speaking of 
it the president, Mr. Albert Keep, in his report said: 

" It is but a few years since the first lines of through cars were established for 
the transportation of freight, between the East and the West, without the necessity 
of frequent transshipments. At the outset the freight carried was mostly of the 
higher classes, or perishable property, but soon extended to the transportation of 
grain destined to such interior towns and cities in the East as had before received 
their supply by rail from the seaboard. The facilities thus employed were well 
calculated to promote, and soon induced, the movement of grain in bulk directly 
to the seaboard cities, especially in winter, and the question of Eastern and foreign 
markets greatly influenced the amount of business, and in some degree the charges 
that were made for transportation. The rates for freight were necessarilv low, 
far less than the local or terminal rates of the grain-producing roads farther west, 
but were received by the trunk lines to the Atlantic cities as an auxiliary source of 
revenue, which furnished, at times, little or no profit, though contributing to the 
general prosperity of the railroads and the exchanges of commerce. These low 
rates for carrying grain readily challenged comparison with the rates charged by 
the roads stretching far out into the great grain-growing districts of the West, and 
it was inferred that most of these railroads were exacting unreasonable or exorbi- 
tant rates wherever they were unaffected by competition. 

******* 

" In the confused understanding of the intricacies of railroad transportation, 
and of the multiplicity of ever-changing circumstances which affect it, there has 
sprung up within this period an unreasonable antagonism in some of the Western 
States against railway corporations and railway management. .Most of the roads 
in that section of the country were built by money furnished by Eastern or foreign 



60 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

capitalists, whether attracted thereto by the allurements of land grants, by local 
considerations, or by the glowing representations of parties interested in the 
country that was so greatly benefited by these roads. 

" Some of the railroads have already been dragged into court under this law, 
and nearly all of the principals compelled to become defendants in suits brought 
against them by the State, because of this change of front on her part and the 
exaction, by statute law, of different conditions for corporate immunity than were 
before enjoyed, or were stipulated by the State in the corporate acts creating the 
companies. 

" Wisconsin, whose railroads, more than all other enterprises combined, have 
enriched the State and developed its resources, passed an act on the 11th of March 
last, known as the ' Potter Act,' which, if possible, exceeds in its oppressive provi- 
sions toward railroads all the unjust legislation of other States. 

" While the State of Wisconsin has made herself conspicuous by legislation 
which would utterly subvert the rights of property, and deprive the owners of her 
railroads of their beneficial use, yet it is due to her people to say that throughout 
the controversy upon this Potter Act, with a very few annoying exceptions, they 
have evinced the most friendly disposition, and generally concurred in condemning 
the hasty legislation which has brought so much evil, without just provocation, 
upon railway property within the State. It can not be possible that the business 
community, or the farmers of Wisconsin, whose honesty and intelligence are equal 
to those of the people of any State, can be fairly represented in the passage of this 
act, and it is confidently believed that, when the present excitement shall subside 
and calmer views prevail, they will demand the repeal of the obnoxious measure, 
and prevent the recurrence of so great an injustice. The continuance of such an 
act upon the statute book would, under any circumstances, be a greater calamity 
to the State than to the railways themselves. Its enforcement might despoil 
them of their income and impair the value of their property, but the consequences 
would paralvze the State, arrest the influx of capital, and destroy confidence in 
all species of corporate property, as resting on the verge of confiscation." 

He then quotes the opinion of an "eminent counsel and distinguished 
jurist" who was engaged in the litigation, and who said: 

" It is deeply to be regretted that such an act should be found upon the pages of 
an American statute. Such legislation destroys our credit and reputation abroad, 
and perils our safety at home. It embodies the spirit of communism under a thin 
disguise. This spirit, born in the seething brain of France, has covered Europe 
with its affiliated societies, and finally traversed the ocean and established itself 
upon our shores. Its principles are openly professed by organized bodies in our 
cities, and its doctrines are publicly taught. The famous saying of a French 
socialist author, 'property is a robbery,' illustrates the beauty of its system. 

" With a strange forgetfulness of the fact that all theories of legislation which 
evolve an attack upon property rights will finally and most naturally reach the 
ownership of land — that being in fact the mode in which the attack has commonly 
been made, both in ancient and modern times — the agricultural classes of the 
Northwest are banding themselves into societies, whose avowed object is seen in 
legislation like the Wisconsin act. Never was there a greater blunder. Of all 
classes in the community, they are the persons most interested in the preservation 
of vested rights, and the just administration of just laws. They own the real 
wealth of the country in its land. They are restless and angry now, because the 
income the land produces is comparatively small. They have suddenly awoke to 
the consciousness that they possess a giant's strength, and they are ready to use it 
with a giant's fury. They consider themselves oppressed by railway corporations, 
and thev make a blind attack upon corporate property. They forget in their 
frenzy that when they have once established the principle of compelling, by law, 
a man who has a large income to divide it with one who has less, they have estab- 
lished a principle capable of indefinite expansion, and one which will surely return 
to 'plague the inventor.' They forget that in all our towns and cities there are 
classes who demand ten hours' wages for eight hours' work, and with whom the 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 61 

cry of • land for the landless ' is no unfamiliar sound. If the legislation now inaugu- 
rated shall succeed, and finally reach its logical results in a new distribution of the 
land — taking from those who have to give to those who have not — it will be with 
a grim smile that the holder of railroad stocks and bonds will recall to the honest 
Granger the words of the German proverb, ' The mills of the gods grind slowly, but 
they grind exceeding small.' " 

THE FINANCIAL PANIC OF 1873 

The financial panic of 1873 and the effect of the Granger laws caused 
such a stringency in the money markets and such widespread disaster 
that not only railroad building substantially ceased, but the roads that 
were operated ceased to earn as they had formerly done. 

SIXTEENTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1874, to May 31, 1875 

During this year the gross earnings of the company were $1,904,000 
less than for the previous fiscal year, and one of the most immediate 
results was that the number of employes was not only largely decreased, 
but the wages of those who were retained also had to be reduced. The 
reduction in the year for labor alone was $513,000. On this point the 
president informed the stockholders that "an examination of the busi- 
ness of the year shows that more than one-half of the decrease in gross 
earnings was caused by a reduction in passenger and freight rates, mainly 
induced by the operation of the 'Potter law' [Granger legislation], 
and by the enforcement of other kindred statutes for ' regulating' trans- 
portation on railroads in the States of Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, and 
Minnesota," and closes by hoping that the destructive laws will be 
repealed. 

SEVENTEENTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1875, to May 31, 1876 

The report for the year ending May 31, 1876, shows no increase in 
the mileage of the road, and but a very small increase in gross earnings, 
over the previous year. They were yet more than a million and a half 
less than they were two years before. In the new shop grounds, just 
outside of Chicago, "nine new and substantial shop buildings, of brick 
and stone, of various classes, covering nearly 34; acres, have been erected 
during the year. * * * These buildings are all heated with steam, 
are supplied with water tanks, steam pumps, hydrants, and pipes con- 
nected with local artesian wells and with the city mains, for greater 
security against fire." 

In this report it is stated the "Potter law" of Wisconsin had been 
superseded, and the equally unjust law of Minnesota had been repealed. 

EIGHTEENTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1876, to May 31, 1877 

At the close of the eighteenth fiscal year of the company things began 
to look a little brighter. The trials, losses, and perils of the "panic of 
1873" were being overcome, and more normal conditions restored; still 
earnings showed a decrease over the preceding year, and this was prin- 
cipally owing to the "Granger legislation" we have referred to, together 
with a short crop in the fall of 1876 in the grain districts traversed by 
the road. Mention in this report is made by the president of the building 
by the company of a short line in Michigan, under the name of the 
Menominee River Railroad, and of another in Iowa, under the name of 
the Maple River Railroad. 



62 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

MARVIN HUGHITT, DIRECTOR AND PRESIDENT 

It will be remembered we said that Mr. Marvin Hughitt joined the 
official force of the company in 1872. In 1877 he was by the stock- 
holders unanimously elected a director of the company. In 1887 he 
was by the directors elected president, to succeed Mr. Albert Keep, 
resigned. Mr. Hughitt is still president of the company. 

Owing to his prominence as a railroad manager, the newspaper press 
and writers are continually printing fictions as to his career. To pre- 
vent such in the future, we give a correct synopsis of that career: 

1S51. ) Telegraph operator at Albany, N. Y., in the office of the New York, Albany 

1853. f & Buffalo Telegraph Company. 

1854. Came to Chicago and was operator in the office of the Illinois & Mississippi 

Telegraph Company. 
1857. Superintendent and trainmaster at Bloomington, 111., of the St. Louis, 

Alton & Chicago Railroad (now the Chicago & Alton Railway). 
1862. Superintendent at Centralia, 111., on the Illinois Central Railroad. 
1864. General superintendent, in Chicago, of the Illinois Central Railroad. 

1870. Assistant general manager of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. 

1871. General superintendent of the Pullman Palace Car Company. 

1872. General superintendent of the Chicago & North- Western Railway. 

1876. General manager of the Chicago & North- Western Railway. 

1877. Director of the Chicago & North- Western Railway. 

1880. Second vice-president and general manager, with office in Chicago, of the 

Chicago &' North-Western Railway. 

1882. * President of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway. 

1884. *President of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad. 
1887. President of the Chicago & North- Western Railway. 

1S90. *Director of the Union Pacific Railroad. 

1891. *President of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway. 

NINETEENTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1877, to May 31, 1878 

The closing of this term showed the operated mileage of the road 
to be 2,078 miles, the Maple River and Menominee River roads having 
been finished and put in operation December 1, 1877. The proprietary 
roads, consisting of the Winona & St. Peter, 327 miles; the Winona, 
Mankato & New Ulm, 3.75 miles; the North-Western Union, 69 miles, 
and the Iowa Midland, 63 miles, made 463 miles, and these, with the 
North-Western proper, made the total operated mileage 2,078 miles. 
The effect of the "panic of 1873," the stagnation from short crops, and 
the evil effects of the Granger legislation were abating, and the bene- 
ficial results of a large crop in the last year were shown in quite a satis- 
factory increase over the preceding year. At the close of this term the 
road owned 369 locomotive engines and 9,642 cars. In this year Mr. 
Charles E. Simmons became land commissioner of the company, owing 
to the death (June 13, 1878) of his predecessor, Mr. Geo. P. Goodwin. 

TWENTIETH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1878, to May 31, 1879 

In the twentieth year of the company about fifty-four miles of road 
were finished and put in operation, viz., the Minnesota Valley Railway, 
from Sleepy Eye to Redwood Falls, twenty miles; the Rochester & 
Northern Minnesota Railway, from Rochester to Zumbrota. sixteen 
miles; the Plainview Railroad, from Plainview Junction to Plainview, 
nine miles, and the Chatfield Railroad, from Chatfield Junction to 

*These offices were held in addition to those he held with the Chicago & North-Western Railway, 
and did not affect his relations with that company. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 63 

Chatfield, about six miles, all in Minnesota; and thereafter became a 
part of "the proprietary roads" of the company. 

TWENTY-FIRST FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1879, to May 31, 1880 

The gross earnings for this term were $17,349,349.04. The capital 
stock "afloat" had a face value of $36,513,610.22; the total bonded 
debt was $50,135,000; the mileage owned and controlled was 2,216; the 
Sac City extension, thirteen miles, and the Toledo & North-Western, 
in Iowa, twelve miles, forty-six miles of the Chicago & Dakota, in Min- 
nesota, and about fifty-seven miles of the Dakota Central, in Dakota, 
having been constructed and put in operation at different times during 
the year. A permanent lease, that afterward was converted into a 
purchase, was made this year of the Des Moines & Minneapolis narrow 
gauge road, running from Des Moines to Callanan, in Hamilton County, 
Iowa. The gauge of this road between Des Moines and Ames, thirty- 
seven miles, was widened, and over it the trains of the North-Western 
Company have daily run into the capital of Iowa ever since. The 
Sheboygan & Western Railway, consisting of about eighty miles of road 
extending from Sheboygan, via Fond du Lac to Princeton, in Green 
County, was also added this year. (See another page for the history 
of this road.) 

A short line, called the Rock River Railroad, was built between 
Janesville and Afton, Wis., and "the Galena & Southern Wisconsin 
and Chicago & Tomah railroads, narrow gauge for a distance of ninety- 
two miles between Galena, 111., and Woodman, Wis., with branches to 
Platteville and Lancaster," were acquired this year. A new passenger 
depot, on the site of the old Galena depot on the corner of Wells and 
Kinzie streets in Chicago, was began this year, and when finished was 
to be the largest and finest passenger station in Chicago, and was to 
allow all of the passenger trains of the three divisions of the North- 
Western road that center at Chicago to arrive and start from the same 
depot. 

TWENTY-SECOND FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1880, to May 31, 1881 

During this term eighteen of the corporations the company owned 
were consolidated into four organizations, viz., The Elgin & State Line 
Railroad, the St. Charles Railroad, and the State Line & Union Com- 
pany were consolidated under the name of the Elgin & State Line Rail- 
road Company. The Chicago & Milwaukee, the North-Western Union, 
the Milwaukee & Madison, the Chicago & Tomah, and the Sheboygan & 
Western were consolidated in Illinois and Wisconsin under the name of 
the Chicago, Milwaukee & North- Western Railway Company; the 
Menominee River Railroad, in Michigan, and the Menominee Railway, 
in Wisconsin, were consolidated under the name of the Menominee River 
Railroad Company; and the Winona & St. Peter, the Winona, Mankato 
& New Ulm, the Plainview, the Chatfield, the Rochester & Northern, 
the Minnesota Valley, and the Chicago & Dakota companies were united 
and formed the Winona & St. Peter Railroad Company. 

THE SHEBOYGAN & FOND DU LAC RAILROAD 

This corporation was the outcome of an older one that was known as 
The Sheboygan & Mississippi Railroad Company. This road was char- 



64 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

tered by the State of Wisconsin, March 8, 1852, with the following com- 
missioners: Ashahel P. Lyman, Henry H. Conklin, William W. King, 
Charles D. Cole, Horatio N. Smith, John Bannister, A. B. Hamilton, 
Samuel W. Beall, John P. Sherwood, Robert Jenkinson, Benjamin F. 
Moore, Thomas B. Stoddard, and James McM. Shafter, with authority 
to locate and build a railroad from the then "village of Sheboygan, via 
Fond du Lac, to the Mississippi River." On March 12, 1855, the act of 
incorporation was amended so as to authorize the building of a branch 
line "from Sheboygan northwesterly to some point on the Fox River." 
The original promoter of the enterprise was Gen. Harrison C. Hobart. 
He interested Hon. Robert J. Walker, a former Secretary of the Treasury 
of the United States, who became an original subscriber for 600 shares, 
and paid $3,000 for preliminary expenses. Before any contracts were 
made or actual work done, an unfortunate disagreement arose and 
Messrs. Walker and Hobart withdrew their connection with the com- 
pany. The project was revived in 1856 by A. P. Lyman, Baillie Williams 
of Sheboygan, Charles D. Cole of Sheboygan Falls, and H. N. Smith of 
Plymouth, and an agreement was made with the city of Fond du Lac 
to the effect that if the city of Sheboygan would build through its 
county, Fond du Lac would complete the line to Lake Winnebago. 

The city of Sheboygan subscribed $200,000 and the county of Sheboy- 
gan $100,000 and a contract was then made with Edward Appleton & 
Co. of Massachusetts to build twenty miles of road in a westerly direction, 
passing through the village of Sheboygan Falls and Plymouth. . Mr. 
Appleton was a practical civil engineer, and he appointed H. G. H. Reed 
as his assistant, and Harrison Barrett of Maine as financial agent, whose 
especial duty was to dispose of the city and county bonds that had been 
voted in aid of the project. The first actual survey was made in the 
spring of 1856, under the direction of Mr. Appleton, and work of con- 
struction following immediately, the first earth was moved on Wednes- 
day, June 4, 1856, William Farnsworth handling the pick, Stephen 
Wolverton the shovel, and Henry Otten trundled the barrow, the first two 
gentlemen being the oldest residents of the city of Sheboygan. The 
monetary panic of 1857 caused a suspension of all work in the fall of that 
year. 

In June, 1858, Amos Otis, Seth Crowell, and others from Barnstable 
County, Massachusetts, visited Sheboygan and were induced to become 
financially interested in the project, and in July, 1858, they sent J. O. 
Thayer to Sheboygan, who was made secretary and treasurer of the 
company. The road was to be laid with rails made in England. Before 
the panic came one cargo of English iron was landed in Sheboygan 
from the schooner A. W. Lucky, and placed for unpaid duties in charge of 
J. T. Kingsbury, who was U. S. collector of the port. The first two 
locomotives were manufactured in Taunton, Mass., were named the 
"Sheboygan" and "Cape Cod," and were brought to Sheboygan on flat 
scows from Milwaukee. The road was opened for business to Sheboygan 
Falls, January 17, 1859; to Decca, May 2; to Plymouth, June 6; and to 
Glenbulah, March 29, 1860. A mortgage given by the road was foreclosed 
in 1860 and the company reorganized in 1861, under the name of the 
Sheboygan & Fond du Lac Railroad Company. A contract was subse- 
quently made with Mr. Barrett for the extension of the road and it was 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 65 

opened for business to Fond du Lac February 14, 1869, and in 1871 was 
extended to Princeton.* On April 3, 1880, the road was sold and its new 
proprietors organized a new company called the Sheboygan & Western 
Railway Company. The following officers were elected and took charge 
of the property: Albert Keep, president; M. Hughitt, vice-president; 
J. B. Redfield, secretary; M. M. Kirkman, treasurer; and L. A. Emerson 
was appointed superintendent, etc. On March 19, 1881, this and two 
other companies were consolidated under the name of the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & North-Western Railway Company, and that was consolidated 
with the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company on June 7, 1883. 

THE WINTER OF 1 880-1 88 1 

The Dakota extension of the road to the Missouri River at Pierre 
(Fort Pierre, of the days of Indian warfare, fur-trading, and the early 
steamboat clays, was on the west bank of the river and opposite to the 
site of the new town of Pierre) was finished in the early fall of 1880, and 
it was the intention of the management to be at Pierre on the day when 
the first through traffic train reached there from the East. The last 
bridge over the Yellow Medicine River was to be finished and the last 
rail laid on October 16th. In the night of October 15th it began to snow, 
and that storm scarcely ceased until May 5, 1881. Such a storm was 
nearly or quite unprecedented in the Northwest. Thousands of settlers 
had, in the summer and fall of 1880, flocked to Minnesota and Dakota 
and settled along the lines of this road; and everyone of them was 
dependent on the trains of this company for fuel and food and light, as 
all were pioneers and had no accumulated stores to draw from. Hence it 
seemed absolutely incumbent on the company to open its lines and keep 
them open. Its snow plows were kept moving day and night and thou- 
sands of men were hired to shovel snow. 

Literally hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent in paying for 
shoveling snow in these six months; and when spring came nothing 
was to be seen as a return for it. The road that was cleared in the day 
would be covered again in the night, and where it was cleared at night 
the next day was sure to overwhelm it again; and so the fight was kept 
up day and night for practically six months. Though many had to live 
on wheat or corn ground in coffee mills or pounded in a mortar, none 
were allowed to starve, and when May came all were ready for the work 
that should have begun in February or March. It is said, and probably 
truly, that over fourteen feet of snow fell that winter "on a level*' in 
Central Minnesota and in what now is South Dakota. The snowstorms 
were accompanied with so much wind that the storms were really "bliz- 
zards." When the wind was not blowing the weather was intensely 
cold and the snow was so granular that it rolled on the surface like 
shot might on a level floor, and this helped to fill the cuts that the snow 
plows and shovelers had made in clearing the track. In many places the 
cuts made by snow plows and shovelers were twenty to forty feet deep, 
so that there had often to be six or seven ranks of shovelers, one above 
the other, on the slope of the bank to move the snow above the track and 
far enough back to keep it from rolling down into the cut as fast as it 

*We are indebted to Mr. J. 0. Thayer of Sheboygan for this otherwise unattainable history of 
this group of roads. 



66 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

was shoveled out. In March, 1SS1, one snowstorm brought full four 
feet on the level of snow. The last snowstorm and snow blockade did 
not occur until May 5, 1881. 

TWENTY-THIRD FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1881, to May 31, 1882 

At the end of this term the company operated 3,278 miles of railroad, 
of which 500 miles were in Illinois, 896 in Wisconsin, 224 in Michigan, 
913 in Iowa, 414 in Minnesota, and 331 in Dakota. The miles of new 
railroad added during the year were 504, consisting of the Toledo & 
North-Western, 207 miles; Chicago, Milwaukee & North- Western, 141 
miles; Iowa South-Western, 52 miles; Menominee River, 16 miles, and 
Dakota Central, 87 miles. The following gives at a glance the growth 
of the road in the last five years : 

Miles operated in 1882 3,032 

Gross earnings in 1882 $23,684,000 

Miles operated in 1877 1,993 

Gross earnings in 1877 , $13,033,000 

This shows an increase of road of 1,039 miles, or 52.15 per cent increase 
in miles of road, and an increase in gross earnings of over $10,000,000, 
or 81.72 per cent in gross earnings. The new passenger depot in 
Chicago was finished and placed in service in the early spring of this 
term. 

TWENTY-FOURTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1882, to May 31, 1883 

During this year the Escanaba & Lake Superior and the Menominee 
River railroad companies of Michigan were consolidated with the Chicago 
& North-Western Company. The Rock River Railway, having a line 
six miles long between Janesville and Afton, Wis., and the Galesville 
& Mississippi Railroad Company, having a line 6^ miles long, extend- 
ing from Galesville to Trempealeau, in Wisconsin, were transferred to 
the North-Western Company. The consolidation of the Elgin & State 
Line Railway Company and the Chicago, Milwaukee & North-Western 
Railway Company was arranged for this year, and the consolidation took 
effect a few days after this term closed. 

PURCHASE OF STOCK OF OMAHA ROAD 

Of this, Mr. Albert Keep, in his presidential report, says: 

" In the month of November last, purchase was made of a majority of the capital 
stock, common and preferred, of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway 
Company, under arrangements for the delivery of the stock and payment therefor 
during the present summer, and the management of that company was reorganized 
and placed under the control of the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company 
on the 16th of December last. The purchase consisted of 93,200 shares of common 
stock, at the average price of 48 40-100 + , and 53,800 shares of preferred stock, 
at the average price of 104 4-100 + , and the cost, including interest up to the date 
of delivery, was $10,503,959.90. * * * . * * . * 

" The system embraced in the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway 
Company at the time of purchase covered 1,147 miles of well-equipped railroad, 
extending from Minneapolis and St. Paul southeast to a connection with this com- 
pany's road at Elroy; northwestwardly to Bayfield and Superior City on Lake 
Superior; southwest wardly to Sioux City, Eastern Nebraska, Omaha, and the 
Union Pacific Railroad, and by its southern connection at the Iowa State line 
opened to the Toledo & North-Western Railway and all the Iowa roads of this 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 67 

company direct communication for the interchanging transportation of grain, 
cattle, coal, lumber, and other products of Iowa and Minnesota; the company had 
other extensions and branches, as well as valuable land grants attaching to its 
Wisconsin lines, whose future development in the lumber interest must afford a 
large accession to traffic. The property of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & 
Omaha Railway Company was much improved and enlarged under its former 
management, and some of its lines had become indispensable, and others greatly 
necessary, to the integrity and completeness of the Chicago & North-Western 
Railwav svstem in the Northwest. 



" Through this channel flowed all the business of the Chicago & North-Western 
Railway Company from Chicago into the great centers of St. Paul and Minneapolis, 
and by it connections were secured with the Manitoba, Northern Pacific, and 
Canadian Pacific Railway lines; its northern branches penetrated the best tim- 
bered regions of Wisconsin, and reached out to Lake Superior, and its southwestern 
and southern extensions from Minneapolis gave to the productive wheat regions 
of the Winona & St. Peter and Dakota Central roads easy access, on short hauls, 
to the unrivaled markets and milling facilities of Minneapolis. The separation of 
these lines from their close and legitimate relations to the Chicago & North-Western 
Railway system would work great injury and loss of revenue to both companies, 
and millions of capital would be required to replace the facilities which are now 
enjoyed by each in the harmonious working of the two lines. It is believed that 
the control of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway Company 
secures advantages of great importance to the stockholders of the two companies, 
and is in the interest of public convenience, economy, and sound corporate 
policy." 

DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS OF THE CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & 
OMAHA ROAD, DECEMBER 31, 1904 

Directors: Eugene E. Osborn, New York; John M. Whitman, Chi- 
cago, 111. ; Thomas Wilson, St. Paul, Minn. ; John A. Humbird, St. Paul, 
Minn.; Albert Keep, Chicago, 111.; William K. Vanderbilt, New York 
H. McK. Twombly, New York; Frederick W. Vanderbilt, New York 
Marvin Hughitt, Chicago, 111.; David P. Kimball, Boston, Mass.; Horace 
G. Burt, Omaha, Neb.; Byron L. Smith, Chicago, 111.; Chauncey M 
Depew, New York. 

General Officers and Staff: Marvin Hughitt, president, Chicago; E 
E. Osborn, vice-president and assistant secretary, New York; J. T 
Clark, second vice-president, St. Paul ; S. O. Howe, treasurer and 
second assistant secretary, New York; R. H. Williams, assistant treasurer 
and third assistant secretary, New York; E. E. Woodman, secretary, 
Hudson, Wis. ; Thomas Wilson, general counsel, St. Paul; W. H. Stennett, 
auditor of expenditures, Chicago; A. W. Trenholm, general manager, St. 
Paul; W. C. Winter, general superintendent, St. Paul; L. A. Robinson, 
comptroller, St. Paul; C. P. Nash, local treasurer, St. Paul; H. M. Pearce, 
general freight agent, St. Paul; T. W. Teasdale, general passenger agent, 
St. Paul; C. W. Johnson, chief engineer, St. Paul; Isaac Seddon, purchas- 
ing agent, St. Paul; T. A. Polleys, tax commissioner, St. Paul; G. W. Bell, 
land commissioner, Hudson, Wis.; G. M. Davidson, chemist and engineer 
of tests, Chicago; Pierce Butler, general attorney, St. Paul; H. C. Hope, 
superintendent of telegraph, St. Paul; E. L. Poole, general claim agent, 
St. Paul; Lyman Sholes, division, freight, and passenger agent, Omaha; 
Edgar F. Woode, general baggage agent, St. Paul. 

General Offices: Chicago, 22 Fifth Avenue; New York, 52 Wall 
Street; Hudson, Wis.; St. Paul, Minn. 



68 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

MILEAGE OF THE OMAHA ROAD 

Miles. 

Wisconsin Division 787 . 77 

Elroy to Westminster Street 192. 82 

Westminster Street to St. Paul (leased) . . 1 . 30 

Westminster Street to Minneapolis (leased) 10. 10 

Hudson to Ellsworth 24 . 82 

Stillwater Junction to Stillwater 3 . 30 

St. Croix Drawbridge to Stillwater Switch 4.55 

Merrillan to Marshfield 38 . 67 

West Eau Claire to Shaw's Mill 2 . 74 

Menomonie Junction to Menomonie 3.01 

Fairchild to Mondovi 36 . 75 

Emerald to Weston 36 . 37 

North Wisconsin Junction to Bayfield 177.57 

Ashland Junction to Ashland 4 . 38 

Ashland Shore Line 1 .31 

Eau Claire to Spooner 81.51 

Junction near Chippewa Falls to Yellow Paver 49. 2S 

Tuscobia to Winter 46 . 00 

Superior Junction to Duluth (including bridge, 1.59 miles) . . 73.29 

Minnesota and Iowa Division 620. 89 

St. Paul to Le Mars 243 . 42 

Le Mars to Sioux City (leased) 25 . 20 

Minneapolis to Merriam (leased) 27 . 00 

Lake Crvstal to Elmore 43 . 43 

Madelia 'to Fairmont 29 . 38 

Bingham Lake to Currie 38 . 63 

Heron Lake to Pipestone 55. 10 

Trent to Mitchell 130. 73 

Luverne to Doon 28 . 00 

Nebraska Division 277 . 81 

Missouri River to Omaha 123 . 06 

Sioux City Union Depot to Bridge Track (leased) .50 

Sioux City Bridge Company's track 3.90 

Coburn to Newcastle 26 . 95 

Emerson to Norfolk 46 . 50 

Wakefield to Hartington 33 . 76 

Wayne to Bloomfield 43 . 1 4 

Total, December 31, 1904 1,686.47 

The mileage by States is as follows: 

Miles. 

Wisconsin 748 . 28 

Minnesota 473 .37 

Iowa 102.05 

Nebraska 274 . 57 

South Dakota 88 . 20 

Total December 31,1904 1,686.47 

TWENTY-FIFTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1883, to May 31, 1884 

An increase of about ISO miles to the mileage of the North-Western 
road was made this year, viz., 126 miles between Ha warden, Iowa, and 
Iroquois, S. D. ; 13 miles between Watertown and Castlewood, S. D.;6 
miles between Batavia and Aurora, 111.; 4+ miles between Sycamore and 
Cortland, 111., and 27 miles of the Maple River Railroad, in Iowa, 
between Holstein and Kingsley. These additions brought the total 
operated mileage up to 3,764 miles 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 69 

PURCHASE OF THE IOWA LEASED ROADS AND THEIR TRIBUTARIES 

This year was effected the purchase of what were known as the 
"Iowa leased lines" and their tributaries. It will be remembered a 
history of the construction of these roads has already been given. 
As to this important purchase the president's report for this year 
said: 

"Circulars and proxies were sent to the stockholders of the company, under 
date of April 15th, last, presenting the matter of purchase of the leased roads 
operated by the company in the State of Iowa, consisting of the Chicago, Iowa & 
Nebraska Railroad, from the Mississippi River Bridge at Clinton to Cedar Rapids, 
82.94 miles; the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad, from Cedar Rapids to 
the Missouri River at Council Bluffs, 274.01 miles — these two constituting the main 
line across the State — and the Maple River Railroad, a valuable connection running 
into Northwestern Iowa, 131.02 miles — total, 487.97 miles — now held under per- 
petual lease; together with their tributary and natural extensions, to wit, the 
Sioux City & Pacific Railroad, from Sioux City to Missouri River Junction, thence 
across the Missouri River to a connection with the Union Pacific Railway at Fre- 
mont, Neb., 107.42 miles; the Missouri Valley and Blair Railway & Bridge Com- 
pany, owning the bridge and its approaches over the Missouri River at Blair, and 
the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad, from Fremont to Valentine, 
near Fort Niobrara, Neb., with the Creighton Branch, 311 miles; total, 418.42 
miles of tributaries, and the Blair Bridge property. * * * At the annual meet- 
ing on the 5th of June, 1884, the agreement of purchase was fully authorized and 
approved by unanimous vote of all the stockholders present and represented. * * 

"The total cost of the properties is $27,875,100, subject to such slight changes 
as may come from adjustments of small items of account, remnants of rights of 
way, etc., and will be represented by the amount of bonds and obligations assumed, 
811,149,600; amount of Chicago & North-Western Railway Company 5 per cent 
25-year debenture bonds, at par, $1,968,000; amount of Chicago & North-Western 
Railway Company common stock, $14,757,500, for the whole 906.39 miles of rail- 
road and bridge property. The average cost will be at the rate of $14,472 per 
mile in bonds and obligations and $16,281 per mile in common stock; total, $30,753 
per mile. ******** 

"The annual charge to the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, by 
assuming the bonds and obligations of the purchased properties, and by paying 
7 per cent on the new stock to be issued therefor, will be less than the amount of 
rental now accruing under the leases, after deducting the net income derived from 
the business of the tributary roads." 

TWENTY-SIXTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1884, to May 31, 1885 

During this year the following companies were consolidated with the 
parent corporation, viz.: the Iowa Midland Railway, 71 miles, from 
Lyons, Iowa, to Anamosa, Iowa; the Stanwood & Tipton Railway, 8% 
miles, from Tipton to Stanwood, Iowa; the Des Moines & Minneapolis 
Railway, 58 miles, from Des Moines, the capital of Iowa, to Jewell Junc- 
tion; the Ottumwa, Cedar Falls & St. Paul Railway, 63 miles, from Belle 
Plaine to Muchakinock, Iowa; and the Iowa Southwestern Railway, 35 
miles, Carroll to Kirkman, Iowa; and 17 miles, Audubon to Manning, 
Iowa. The capital stock now amounted to $63,697,000, of which 
$10,006,800 was in the company's treasury. The funded debt 
amounted to $91,460,500, on which the yearly interest charge was 
$5,064,533.73. The gross earnings (exclusive of the Sioux City & Pacific 
and the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley railroads, which were still 
operated as independent lines) amounted to $23,502,055.56, while the 
operating expenses and taxes were $13,793,907.05. The road had 672 
locomotive engines and 21,054 cars of all kinds at the end of this term. 
It used during the year 827,656 tons of coal, at a cost of $2.5S per ton. 



70 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

In the twenty-fifth fiscal year the coal used cost $2.58 per ton, and in 
the twenty-fourth, $2.68 per ton. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1885, to May 31, 1886 

The Northern Illinois Railway, from Belvidere to the coal fields at 
Spring Valley, 111., 77 miles, and an extension of the Dakota Central 
Railway, from Centerville to Yankton, 8. D., about 29 miles, all east of 
the Missouri River; and an extension of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri 
Valley Railroad, from Valentine to west of Chadron, Neb., 137 miles, 
and from Chadron, north toward the Black Hills, to Buffalo Gap, S. D., 
about 55 miles, were completed this year. By the end of this term the 
mileage had grown to 3,949 miles. 

TWENTY-EIGHTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1886, to May 31, 1887 

This term showed the following accretions to the road's operated 
mileage, viz.: Columbia, S. D., to Oakes, N. D., 39 miles; Redfield to 
Faulkton, S. D., 33 miles; Doland to Verdon, S. D.. 25 miles; Lake City 
to Wall Lake Junction, Iowa, 16 miles; Mapleton to Onawa, Iowa, 20 
miles; Janesville to Evansville, Wis., 16 miles, and Winona Junction 
to La Crosse, Wis., 4 miles. In addition to these the Fremont, Elkhorn 
& Missouri Valley built as follows: Buffalo Gap to Rapid City, S. D., 
48 miles; Dakota Junction (just west of Chadron) to the Nebraska- 
Wyoming State line, 58 miles; Fremont to Lincoln, Neb., 52 miles; 
Scribner to Lindsay, 61 miles, and under its tributary, the Wyoming 
Central Company- (which was leased to and operated by the Fremont, 
Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad Company), it built from the Nebraska- 
Wyoming State line to Douglas, Wyo., 77 miles. 

NEW GENERAL OFFICE BUILDING IN CHICAGO 

A brick building on the corner of Fifth Avenue and Lake Street, in 
Chicago, was bought in July, 1883, by the company and when leases, 
existing at the time of the purchase, had expired it was remodeled and 
practically rebuilt and converted into an office building for the use of 
the company's offices. It was finished at a total cost, from date of pur- 
chase to occupancy, of about $300,000 and was taken possession of and 
occupied by the company in January, 1887. 

Mr. Marvin Hughitt was elected president on June 2, 1887, but 
signed the annual report for this fiscal year, as it was not out of the 
printer's hands until August 1, 1887. 

TWENTY-NINTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1887, to May 31, 1888 

The total mileage at the close of the fiscal year was 4,210.75 miles, 
composed of the following lines: 

The Chicago & North- Western Railway Company proper. . 2,521 . 51 

The Winona & St. Peter Railroad Company. . . .' 448.48 

The Dakota Central Railway Company 723.93 

The Toledo & Northwestern Railway Company 3S5. 19 

The Northern Illinois Railway Company 75.78 

The Princeton & Western Railway Company 16.06 

The Sycamore, Conrtland & Chicago Railroad Company.. . 4.64 

The Iron Riyer Railway Company 35. 16 

Total 4,210.75 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 71 

The mileage added since last year (including a fractional correction 
of distance) is 109 miles, made up of 41 miles from Faulkton, S. D., to 
Gettysburg, S. D., and 14 miles from Verdon to Groton, S. D., both on 
the Dakota Central line: 35 miles from Iron River to Watersmeet, on 
the Iron River Railway in Michigan; 3 miles in Michigan to the Dunn 
iron mines; 9 miles from Kingsley to Moville, on the Sioux Valley Branch, 
Iowa, and 5 miles from Beverly to Otis, in Linn County, Iowa. The 
three short lines last named, and the Boone Branch to the coal banks 
in Iowa, heretofore called "The Iowa Railway Coal & Manufacturing 
Company," have been taken into the mileage of the Chicago & North- 
Western Railway Company since the last report. The 4,210.75 miles 
of railroad are situated as follows: 586 miles, or 13.93 per cent, in 
Illinois; 940 miles, or 22.34 per cent, in Wisconsin; 347 miles, or 8.26 per 
cent, in Michigan; 414 miles, or 9.85 per cent, in Minnesota; 1,163 miles, 
or 27.62 per cent, in Iowa, and 758 miles, or 18 per cent, in Dakota. 
This does not include any of the trans-Missouri River lines, which had 
increased their mileage by 354 miles and had brought their mileage 
up to 1,154 miles. 

THIRTIETH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1888, to May 31, 1889 

This year only two short lines were constructed, viz.: The Iron Range 
Railroad in Michigan, 34 miles, and a railroad called the Lake Geneva 
& State Line Railway, from Lake Geneva, Wis., to Williams Bay, 6 
miles. Of these the president remarks: 

"It will be noticed that the length of the new road added is less than 1 per cent of 
the mileage and is less than the amount added in any previous year for the last twelve 
years." 

During the year the Iron River Railway and the Iron Range Railway 
of Michigan, and the Lake Geneva & State Line Railway, in Wisconsin, 
in all about seventy-five miles, which were already owned by the Chicago 
& North- Western Company, were consolidated with it. 

MORE GRANGER LEGISLATION 

During this year the railroads experienced a new attack of the Popu- 
listic Grangerism that had been epidemic in the seventies. Of this the 
president, in his report to the stockholders, said: 

"In common with other railways, the property has been operated during the past 
year under rather anomalous conditions. Besides the effects which have necessarily 
been experienced from the continued operation of the interstate commerce law in 
its general application to the traffic moved upon our lines, there has been State legis- 
lation and imposition of rates to diminish the revenues. The Legislatures in most of 
the States in which the property is situated have sought to take away the power of 
railways to make rates and to give it to commissioners created by the State, thus 
reversing, in the matter of transportation, the usual methods of business, by giving the 
power to fix prices to those who wish to buy and compelling the acceptance of such 
prices by those who wish to sell. Nor is this a mere threat of power held over the 
property. It is thoroughly and effectually exercised in some places. In Minnesota 
the State Commission has, in several instances, so exercised it as to fix prices for service 
at less than the actual cost of performing it. The Supreme Court of that State has de- 
cided that the power of the State Commission to fix such rates is unlimited, and that 
neither the Constitution of the United States nor of the State affords the owners of 
the property any protection against such legislation. Xor has this been held by that 
court as an abstract proposition merely. It awarded a peremptory writ of mandamus 
ordering, under penalty of fine and imprisonment, obedience to an order where the 
undisputed record before showed an actual spoliation of the property. 



72 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"The commissioners of the State of Iowa by an order established rates for all the 
roads, which, if applied to all the business of the interstate lines, would prevent any 
return upon the capital stock invested in those enterprises. Resort to both State and 
national tribunals has so far been effectual to protect the property from that order, 
and the last named courts have held that they would not interfere until the results 
of actual experience under the rates had demonstrated their effect upon the revenues 
of the railway companies. These properties are, therefore, in the plight that, in case 
of the exaction by the commission of non-compensatory rates, the companies must 
suffer actual loss, even to the verge of confiscation, before the courts will afford relief. 
Should the prescribed rates be found, upon trial, to have the damaging effect claimed, 
there would be no redress from the State, because [saving Wisconsin] a sovereign State 
can not be sued. In ordinary cases irreparable injuries to property other than rail- 
ways can be prevented by the writ of injunction, but to them this protection is denied. 
Writs of error have been allowed in the Minnesota cases, in which this company has 
a direct interest, and they have been removed to the Supreme Court of the United 
States. It is hoped that they may be so advanced as to be decided before the close of 
the present year. 

" In connection with the questions involved in these cases it may be mentioned that 
in the case of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company vs. the Iowa Com- 
missioners it was stated, in the opinion of the distinguished judge on that hearing, 
that the questions involved in that case were purely legal, and that the main one is the 
power of the State to make and enforce rates of transportation to be charged by rail- 
road corporations and other common carriers, when, from the pleading, such rates are 
admitted to be so low as not to pay fixed charges and operating expenses. This ques- 
tion, which has never been squarely determined by the Supreme Court, either of this 
State or of the United States, is one which must be met by the courts and passed 
upon, the same as other questions of controverted rights between the State and the 
individual." 

THIRTY-FIRST FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1889, to May 31, 1890 

This year was built a new brick and stone passenger depot in Mil- 
waukee for the exclusive use of this company and its patrons. It fronts 
on Wisconsin Street 138 feet, on the lake front 154 feet, and with an 
average width of 48 feet; also an iron train shed 450 by 85 feet, with 
additional shed room 56 by 40 feet for express rooms; also a baggage and 
express building 176 by 24 feet, all equipped with steam heating and 
electric lights. 

No new road construction was undertaken by the North-Western 
Company or its tributary roads this year, nor was the mileage of the 
road extended. 

THIRTY-SECOND FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1890, to May 31, 1891 

The Junction Railway, in Cook County, Illinois, 7^ miles long, and the 
Paint River Railway, in Michigan, fifteen miles long, were added this 
year. The first named completed a system of outside connections 
between the three main lines of the company that enter the city of Chi- 
cago, and enabled the company to transfer freight from one division to 
another without bringing it into the crowded city yards. It also com- 
pleted a belt system, owned by the company, from North Evanston, 
on its Milwaukee Division, to a connection with the Illinois Central 
Railroad at Sixteenth Street, Chicago, on the lake shore, on the south. 
The Paint River road was built, as an extension on the Crystal Falls 
Branch, in the iron ore district of Michigan, and especially to give trans- 
portation to the ores of the Hemlock and other iron ore mines of that 
locality. Both these roads have been consolidated with the North- 
western Company, as also has been the Toledo & Northwestern Rail- 
way in Iowa. The trans-Missouri lines were, during this year, extended 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 73 

from Whitewood to Deadwood, about 10 miles; Whitewood to Belle 
Fourche, 21 miles; and Buffalo Gap to Hot Springs, 14 miles. 

THIRTY-THIRD FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1891, to May 31, 1892 

The purchase of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway by 
the North- Western Company, and the reasons therefor, are given by 
the president in his report for this year as follows: 

"The relations of this company's railway to the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western 
Railway have for many years been of progressive importance, and the geographical 
position of the two properties in Wisconsin and on the peninsula of Michigan has been 
such as to appeal to the highest interests of each, for the development and encourage- 
ment of reciprocal traffic, which found its market and outlets through the channels 
of transportation supplied by means of the facilities afforded by both companies, 
especially in the transportation of iron ore, and, to some extent, of forest products. A 
growing business, common to both roads, has been developed and built up at various 
points on the main lines in Eastern and Northern Wisconsin by cooperation of service 
and interchange of connecting traffic, which it is the interest of both companies to 
foster and preserve. 

"For many years the southern terminus of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western 
Railway has been made in the city of Milwaukee, through the use of the Chicago & 
North- Western tracks under a trackage contract, and the time for a readjustment of 
that arrangement was impending during the last year. Negotiations looking to a closer 
alliance were entered into, and finally closed by a proposition that was accepted by 
the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company to take over the property of the 
Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway Company by the acquirement upon terms 
which were believed to be just to all parties concerned. 

"The conditions were that the holders of Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western stock 
might exchange their stock for Chicago & North-Western common stock, in the pro- 
portion of nine shares of Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western preferred stock for ten 
shares of Chicago & North-Western stock, and five shares of Milwaukee, Lake Shore 
& Western common stock for four shares of Chicago & North-Western stock, to the 
extent of 50,000 shares of Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western preferred stock, and 
26.500 shares of Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western common stock, making in all 
76,500 share? Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western stock to be surrendered for 76,755 
55-100 shares Chicago & North-Western common stock. 

"The exchange, which began in December last, has been steadily pursued, and up 
to the close of the fiscal year, on the 31st of May last, the entire capital stock of the 
Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Company had been taken up excepting 122 shares, 
and for this small amount engagement for exchange had been made. * * * 

"This transaction, now virtually completed, will, it is believed, prove advantageous 
to the interests of both roads, and promote the public welfare by the practical union 
of the properties, in placing at their disposal the operating resources and advantages 
of both companies for the greater economy of service and dispatch of business. The 
two corporations are, however, not merged by this change of ownership, but the affairs 
of each company, in respect to its organization, liabilities, operations, and management, 
are kept separate and distinct from the other, with independent accounting and reports 
of each at the close of their respective fiscal years." 

THE MILWAUKEE, LAKE SHORE & WESTERN RAILWAY 

This corporation was the outcome of several others that had been 
incorporated in Wisconsin and Michigan and that had flourished, more 
or less, had died, become bankrupt, and had been sold out under the 
mortgages, had been sold to others, or had been merged and consolidated. 
Their order of incorporation and existence was as follows: 

I. THE APPLETON & NEW LONDON RAILWAY COMPANY 

This company was chartered by the State of Wisconsin April 9, 1866, 
to build a railroad from Applet on to New London. Part of it was sold June 
1, 1872, to the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad Company, and 
the remainder was sold December 10, 1S75, under mortgage foreclosure. 



74 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



II. THE MILWAUKEE, MANITOWOC & GREEN BAY RAILROAD COMPANY 

This company was chartered by the State of Wisconsin March 10, 
1870, to build a line of railroad from Milwaukee to Manitowoc and Green 
Bay. The name was changed May 31, 1872, to the Milwaukee, Lake 
Shore & Western Railroad Company. (This company was generally 
known as the "Lake Shore Road.") On December 10, 1875, the Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore & Western road was sold under mortgage fore- 
closure. A reorganization was immediately effected and a contract 
made for the building of the road, under which a portion of the route 
between Milwaukee and Port Washington was graded, but work was 
soon suspended. In September, 1871, grading was recommenced at 
Sheboygan and completed the same season through that county. The 
road was completed to Milwaukee in December, 1872, Joseph Vilas 
being president, William Elwell superintendent, and H. G. H. Reed 
chief engineer. 

The first regular train between Sheboygan and Milwaukee was run 
January 1, 1S73. The road was completed in 1873 to Manitowoc and 
to a connection with the Manitowoc & Western, and the two roads were 
united under the name of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Rail- 
road Company. On a later foreclosure of the mortgage held by S. S. 
Sands & Co. of New York, the name was changed to the Milwaukee, 
Lake Shore & Western Railway Company. 

III. THE VIEUX DESERT & LAKE SHORE RAILROAD COMPANY 

This company was organized under the General Laws of Michigan. 
September 28, 1881, and was consolidated with the Milwaukee, Lake 
Shore & Western Railway Company on February 13, 1883. 

IV. THE WOLF RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY 

This company w T as organized under the General Laws of Wisconsin, 
August 29, 1885, and was sold to the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western 
Railway Company on January 15, 1889. 

V. THE MILWAUKEE, LAKE SHORE & WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

This company was organized under the General Laws of Wisconsin, 
December 11, 1875, by the parties who had on December 10, 1875, pur- 
chased the properties and franchises of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & 
Western Railroad Company and the Appleton & New London Railway 
Company. The Yicux Desert & Lake Shore Company was merged by 
consolidation, February 13, 1883, and the Wolf & Wisconsin River 
Railroad Company by purchase January 15, 18S9. The whole property 
was sold to the Chicago & North- Western Railway Company, August 
19, 1893. 

The Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway was mostly built in 
advance of the settlement of the country it runs through, and principally 
for the purpose of developing that country and making it accessible to 
settlers. Mr. F. W. Rhinelander was the moving spirit in the building 
ami extension of the line from the day he became connected with it 
until its sale to the North- Western Company. 

The Gogebic iron range, that was discovered by J. L. Norris (and for 
whom one of the principal mines was named), caused the road to be 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 75 

pushed into what is now a very valuable iron-ore producing territory. 
Many branches were built under Mr. Rhinelander from the main line to 
mill and factory si+es, and by this means many manufacturers were 
induced to build plants on and at the terminals of these branches. 
To-day there are a vast number of manufactories all along the line, 
Lnd all, substantially, depend upon the great forests of timber that still 
Lover the country adjacent to the road. 

MERGER OF THE WYOMING CENTRAL RAILWAY 

The Wyoming Central Railway was consolidated with the Fremont, 
Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad during this term, it having been a 
proprietary road of the latter company until this time. When merged 
its mileage was 130 miles. The Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley road 
was extended by an addition of eighteen miles of narrow-gauge road built 
to various mines in the Deadwood district. 

THIRTY-FOURTH FISCAL YEAR June i, 1892, to May 31, 1893 

As to the recent purchase of the control of the capital stock of the 
Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway Company, in his report to 
the stockholders for this year the president said: 

"Pursuant to the arrangement which was nearly completed at the close of the last 
fiscal year for acquiring the stock of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway 
Company, the few remaining shares which were then unexchanged have since been 
delivered, and the entire amount of capital stock, consisting of 50,000 shares of pre- 
ferred and 26,500 shares common stock, came into the possession of the Chicago & 
North-Western Railway Company. To more permanently cement the union thus 
formed by the ownership of stock, and with a view to the best development of the 
property and economy of operations, measures were taken by the respective boards of 
directors of the two companies for merging the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western 
Railway Company into the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, and notice 
of the same was published in the calls of the last annual meetings. Agreements to 
formally effect the merger were submitted to the stockholders of both companies at 
their June meetings and were unanimously approved, and the directors and officers 
were authorized and empowered to carry out the arrangement. The concluding steps 
are in progress at the time of issuing this report and are expected to be fully accom- 
plished during the present season, whereby the railroad, property, and franchises, as 
well as the duties and obligations of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway 
Company, now practically assumed by the Chicago & North- Western in virtue of owner- 
ship, will be formally transferred, taken over, and united by merger to the Chicago 
& Xorth-Western Railway Company, and become an integral part of the property 
comprised in its system." 

On the night of October 28th and 29th of 1892, in a great fire in the 
city of Milwaukee, Wis., the company lost in freight houses and contents, 
platforms, and 180 freight cars, property to the value of $222,809.96. 
The gross earnings for the year were $32,709,747.15, but this does not 
include the earnings of the trans-Missouri lines. There was no increase 
in the mileage of the road this year. 

THIRTY-FIFTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1893, to May 31, 1894 

The miles reported in this year were 5,031, as the 758 miles of the 
late Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway were included, as that 
road was absorbed into the North-Western corporation on September 
1, 1893, "and ceased to be a separate corporation." Its earnings after 
this fiscal year are included in those of the North-Western Company. 



76 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

THIRTY-SIXTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1894, to May 31, 1895 

The Financial Panic of 1893 and the Pullman Car-Shops Strike 

Of these the president said: 

" The fiscal year covered by this report was marked by a series of adverse circum- 
stances which greatly reduced both freight and passenger earnings. At its beginning, 
business had not recovered from the general depression of the previous two years, when 
freight earnings had fallen off with the decline of numerous industries, and the situation, 
with respect to passenger traffic, was only relieved by the exceptional movement of 
World's Fair travel. These existing conditions were soon aggravated by the formidable 
labor strike which originated at the Pullman Car Shops, and, in spreading, involved 
the company's lines, in common with other roads at Chicago and throughout the West, 
to the interruption of communication, trade, and travel, with corresponding loss of 
revenue. This disturbance was followed by the unparalleled and almost complete 
failure of the crops in Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota, and by less general failure 
in other regions served by the company's system of roads, and the immense volume 
of tonnage dependent upon the movement of agricultural products, and the consequent 
prosperity attending the same, were lost to the year's business, and the result is shown 
in the unusual decline of receipts, both in freight and passenger earnings. Notwith- 
standing the large curtailment of expenditures in all departments as compared with 
former recent years, made necessary by the serious falling off in tonnage movement 
and passengers, the amount of material and labor expended has been sufficient to main- 
tain the property in good condition." 

No additions were made to the mileage this year. 
THE TRANS-MISSOURI LINES 

These lines also suffered with all others on account of the panic of 
1893. Of this the president remarks: 

"The causes which produced this unprecedented decrease in the earnings of the 
company are everywhere known, and are briefly summed up in the almost failure of 
the crops — especially the failure of the corn crop — the total yield of which, in the great 
State of Nebraska, as estimated by the United States Department of Agriculture, was 
but 13,855,524 bushels, against 157,278,895 bushels in 1893 Similar disaster also 
caused a heavy shrinkage in the yield of other grains, and the injury inflicted upon the 
year's business was irremediable and continuous. It is gratifying to add that, at the 
time of the issuing of this report, the prospects of a fine harvest are good, and a recovery 
from the unfavorable conditions which prevailed during the year and diminished the 
earnings of the company is confidently expected." 

THIRTY-SEVENTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1895, to May 31, 1896 

Miles of Railroad 

"The amount of railroad comprising the system of the Chicago & North- Western 
Railway operated during the year and covered by this report was 5,030.78 miles, con- 
sisting of: 

Miles. 

Chicago & North-Western Railway 3,782.29 

Winona & St. Peter Railroad 448.48 

Dakota Central Railway 723.93 

Princeton & Western Railway 16.06 

Total owned 4,970.76 

St. Paul, Eastern Grand Trunk Railway, leased line taken over from Mil- 
waukee,. Lake Shore & Western Railway 60.02 

Road operated 5,030.78 

"These lines are, for the convenience of operation, classified into nine general divi- 
sions as follows: Galena Division, 405.76 miles; Iowa Division, 618.43 miles; Northern 
Iowa Division, 545.91 miles; Wisconsin Division, 556.85 miles; Madison Division, 
509.27 miles; Ashland Division, 757.71 miles; Peninsula Division, 464.44 miles; Winona 
& St. Peter Division, 448.48 miles, and the Dakota Division, 723.93 miles. The system 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 77 

lies in seven States, to-wit : in Illinois, 593.97 miles, or 11.81 per cent; in Iowa, 1,163.12 
miles, or 23.12 per cent; in Wisconsin, 1,579.62 miles, or 31.40 per cent; in Michigan, 
521.19 miles, or 10.36 per cent; in Minnesota, 414.47 miles, or 8.24 per cent; in South 
Dakota, 744.13 miles, or 14.79 per cent; and in North Dakota, 14.28 miles, or .28 per 
cent. 

Capital Stock 

The amount of capital stock on May 31, 1896, was $63,756,320.53 

The amount of same on May 31, 1895, was 63,726,320. 53 

Increase during the year $30,000 . 00 

This increase consisted of $15,000 of common stock and $15,000 of preferred stock, 
issued of conversion for $30,000 Peninsula Railroad of Michigan first mortgage bonds. 

Description of Capital Stock Outstanding, May 31, 1896 

Common stock $39,069,257.92 

Preferred stock 22,349,660 . 00 

$61,418,917.92 

Stock Owned by the Company 

Common stock $ 2,333,608.05 

Preferred stock 3,794 . 56 

2,337,402.61 

Total $63,756,320.53 

Gross Earnings 

The gross earnings for the year were: 

From passengers $ 7,408,827. 15 

From freight 24,354,621 .96 

From express, mails, etc 1,725,311 .99 

Total $33,488,761 . 10 

This does not include the earnings of the Trans-Missouri lines. 

THIRTY-EIGHTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1896, to May 31, 1897 

At the end of this term the equipment of the company consisted of 
1,010 locomotive engines and 35,911 cars of all kinds. During this fiscal 
year the engines ran 33,091,522 miles, which was a decrease of 1,216,074 
miles as compared with the preceding year. The tons of coal consumed 
on locomotive engines were 1,268,718, and the average cost was $1.50 
per ton. The number of passengers carried was 13,821,065, and of the 
freight there was carried 15,225,138 tons. No increase was made to the 
mileage of the North-Western proper nor to that of the Trans-Missouri 
lines. 

THIRTY-NINTH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1897, to May 31, 1898 

The president reports that business shows a revival this term, the 
increase in gross receipts over the last fiscal year being $5,073,317.57. 

TRACK ELEVATION IN CHICAGO 

Track elevation in Chicago was pushed this year, the work having been 
begun by this company in May, 1895. At the end of this year the track 
elevated equaled twenty miles of elevated, double-track road with 10,655 
lineal feet of double-track steel bridging resting on stone piers and 
abutments. 

6 



78 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

THE WISCONSIN NORTHERN RAILWAY 

The Wisconsin Northern Railway, a projected line of about 115 miles, 
organized in the interests of the company February 11, 1896, was 
completed to the extent of forty-six miles on July 15, 1897, and opened 
for traffic. This road was, on September 10, 1897, purchased by and 
merged into the Chicago & North- Western Railway. 

GENERAL MORTGAGE GOLD BONDS OF 1987 

To unify and consolidate the bonds of the road it was determined 
to issue a general mortgage that would in time take the place of all of 
the then outstanding bonds of the company. As to this issue of bonds, 
the president, in his report for this year, said: 

"The board of directors of the company by resolutions duly adopted at its meetings 
held July 8, and October 6, 1897, and the stockholders by the concurring vote of more 
than two-thirds of the capital stock at a special meeting held September 22, 1897, 
authorized the issue of $165,000,000 bonds, to be called 'general mortgage gold bonds 
of 1987.' * * * Of the $165,000,000 bonds authorized, $114,302,000 are reserved 
and issuable from time to time for the purpose of paying, retiring, or refunding at or 
before maturity the outstanding existing bonds and funded obligations of the Chicago 
& North- Western Railway Company, upon 3,828.10 miles of its completed railroad; 
and $17,343,000 are also reserved and issuable for the like purpose of retiring the exist- 
ing bonded indebtedness of its allied proprietary lines — the Winona & St. Peter Railroad 
Company and the Dakota Central Railway Company — covering 1,172.41 miles of addi- 
tional railroad, upon the consolidation of the same with the Chicago & North-Western 
Railway Company, making together an aggregate of $131,645,000 of the bonds to be 
used and applied expressly for these purposes upon 5,000.81 miles of consolidated 
railroad." 

FORTIETH FISCAL YEAR— June 1, 1898, to May 31, 1899 

No new lines of road were built this year, but the construction of 
second tracks was pushed so that at the end of this year the president 
could tell the stockholders that they had "625 miles of double-track 
railway," being double track from Chicago to La Moille, Iowa, 296 miles, 
and other pieces enough to make up 333 miles of double-track railway 
on the line between Chicago and the Missouri River at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa. The rest of the double track was between Chicago and Milwaukee ; 
Chicago and Janesville, Wis., etc. Track elevation in Chicago was also 
pushed this year so that the president reported, "The tracks of the com- 
pany in the city of Chicago, thus far elevated, reduced to the basis of a 
double-track railway, are equivalent to 27.04 miles, and include the 
equivalent of 15,378 lineal feet of double-track steel bridging." As to 
the construction of new lines, the president said: 

"The general prosperity pervading the country occupied by this company's system 
of roads has stimulated and brought forward various schemes for the extension of 
other systems, by the construction or acquisition of additional railroads in various 
localities, and the work of enlarging and establishing other lines has actively progressed. 
To meet these conditions, this company has found it necessary for the protection of 
its traffic upon existing lines and to reach and accommodate new business developing 
in adjacent regions, to enlarge its system by the organization of minor corporations or 
proprietary railway companies in the States of Iowa and Minnesota, for the construction 
of branch lines and extensions in its interest, as against adverse interests and influences 
created by the several new lines of railway under the control of other companies. 

"In pursuance of this policy two railway companies have been incorporated in these 
States, one, the Boyer Valley Railway Company, in the State of Iowa, for the construc- 
tion of a line connecting with this company's railway in Sac County, Iowa, near Wall 
Lake, and extending in a southwesterly direction about twenty-five miles to a connec- 
tion with the Chicago & North-Western Railway, at or near Denison Station, and also 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 79 

a line beginning at a point on said described line in Crawford County, Iowa, and extend- 
ing westerly and southwesterly to a point of connection with the Sioux City & Pacific 
Railroad in Harrison County, Iowa, a distance of about sixty-five miles, making a total 
estimated length of ninety miles of proposed railway. The other organization is the 
Minnesota & Iowa Railway Company in the States of Minnesota and Iowa, for the con- 
struction of a railroad beginning in Redwood County, Minnesota, and running thence 
in a general southerly and southeasterly direction, intersecting the Winona & St. Peter 
Railroad at or near the town of Sanborn, and continuing in a southeasterly course to 
the southern boundary of the State of Minnesota, thence into the State of Iowa to a 
connection with the north and south Iowa line of the Chicago A North-Western Railway, 
at or near Burt Station, a distance in the aggregate of about 119 miles. These roads 
are both under construction by their respective companies incorporated in the interest 
of the Chicago it North-Western Railway Company, and it is expected that they will 
be completed ready for operation during the ensuing fiscal year." 

FORTY-FIRST FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1899, to May 31, 1900 

Union of Proprietary Companies 
On this subject the president said: 

"The board of directors of the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, at its 
meeting held in the city of New York on December 8, 1899, adopted measures looking 
to the union of all of its lines of railway and proprietary companies whose stocks are 
owned by this company and whose lines form a part of the North-W r estern system. 
The requisite measures to accomplish the union of said properties with the Chicago & 
North- Western Railway Company were presented to the stockholders and bondholders 
at the annual meeting of the company held at the company's office in the city of Chicago 
on June 7, 1900, and the adjourned meeting thereof, for their approval. "Affirmative 
action was taken by unanimous vote to ratify and confirm and perfect the acts and 
proceedings of the directors, the officers of the company being authorized and empow- 
ered to acquire title to said railways and railway properties and complete the union 
with this company by proper and sufficient conveyances. The lines of railway and 
proprietary companies taken over by the Chicago & North- Western Railway Companv 
at said meeting by proper deeds of conveyance were as follows: The Boyer Valley 
Railway in Iowa: the Boone County Railway in Iowa; the Harlan it Kirkman Railway 
in Iowa; the Minnesota & Iowa Railway in Minnesota and Iowa; the Iowa, Minnesota 
it North-Western Railway in Minnesota and Iowa; the Winona it St. Peter Railroad, 
embracing the following lines, viz.: The Dakota Central Railway; the Mankato it 
New Ulm Railway; and The Minnesota it South Dakota Railway. The three last named 
railways, having already been absorbed by the Winona it St. Peter Railroad Company, 
form in this union a part of that road. The mileage of the respective properties pur- 
chased will be found included in the statement of mileage of the Chicago it North-Western 
Railway Company. * * * * * * * * * 

Mileage, Including Purchased Roads 
The mileage of the combined system, including proprietary roads and the new lines 
added by the union of the properties, at the last annual meeting in June, 1900, is as follows: 
The Chicago it North-Western Railway, including the Winona & St. Peter Mile*. 
Railroad — the latter embracing the Dakota Central Railway, the Mankato 
it New Ulm Railway, and the Minnesota it South Dakota Railway (the 
two last named just being completed) 5,073.51 

Miles of Other Lines Added 

Boyer Valley Railway 86 . 10 

Minnesota it Iowa Railway 119.10 

Iowa, Minnesota it North-Western Railway (just being completed) 194.16 

Boone County Railway (just being completed) 7.25 

Harlan it Kirkman Railway 6.30 

Total 5,486 42 

To the above should be added the following proprietary lines: 

Princeton & Western Railway 16.06 

St. Paul Eastern Grand Trunk Railway (leased) 60.02 

Total mileage 5,562.50 



80 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

FORTY-SECOND FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1900, to May 31, 1901 

During this term the following new lines were finished: 

Miles. 
Iowa, Minnesota & North- Western Railway 194. 16 

From Belle Plaine, Iowa, to Fox Lake, Minnesota. 
Mankato & New Ulm Railway 25.58 

From Mankato to New Ulm, Minnesota. 
Minnesota & South Dakota Railway 32 . 20 

From Tyler, Minnesota, to Astoria, South Dakota. 
Boone County Railway 7.25 

From Boone to eight-tenths of a mile east of Ogden, Iowa. 

These lines were then taken over and consolidated with the Chicago 
& North- Western Railway Company. 

Resignation of Mr. M. L. Sykes as Vice-President 

The president's report says: 

"Mr. Martin L. Sykes, who for more than thirty years has occupied the position of 
vice-president, secretary, and, for a portion of the time, treasurer of this company, 
voluntarily retired from its service at the close of this fiscal year. * * * * In 
accepting the resignation of Mr. Sykes, the board of directors adopted the following 
minute: 

" ' While deeply regretting his retirement from the executive position he has filled 
so long, faithfully, and ably, we recognize that he has earned the right in his own time, 
and at his own pleasure, for rest from the cares and labors of business. During his 
fifty-six years in the railway service he has been one of the factors in the growth of the 
vast system of transportation which has developed our country. For thirty-three 
years as vice-president and treasurer he has had the custody and administration of the 
revenues of the company. During that period of great extensions of the North- Western 
system and wonderful increase in its receipts and expenditures, his duties have grown 
in importance and imposed upon him greater responsibilities. It is a proud reminiscence 
for him, and a most gratifying history for the directors and stockholders of this company, 
that for a third of a century in the handling of vast sums and the discharge of most 
important trusts, Mr. Sykes stands as a conspicuous example of the best type of a 
financial officer. He carries with him in his retirement our best wishes for a long life 
and health, and the enjoyment during a serene old age of the joys of a well-spent and 
happy life.' " 

THE PENSION SYSTEM 

The pension system was adopted by the board of directors December 
12, 1900, and was promulgated by the president by the issuance of the 
following: 

GENERAL NOTICE 

For some time the board of directors has been considering plans for pensioning 
the employes of the company who have rendered it long and faithful service, and at 
the meeting of the board, held in New York on the 12th instant, the following plan, 
having been matured, was adopted: 

Section 1 — The board of directors of the Chicago & North- Western Railway Com- 
pany, for the benefit of its faithful employes, hereby creates the following pension 
system and rules and instrumentalities for carrying out its provisions. 

Sec. 2. — Of the employes in the service of the company, the following classes 
are affected: 

*(a) — All employes who have attained the age of seventy years and who have been 
twenty years in the service shall be retired and pensioned; provided, however, that this 
clause shall not be mandatory in its application to executive officers appointed by 
the board of directors. 

*(b) — All employes sixty-five to sixty-nine years of age, inclusive of both years, 
who have been twenty or more years in the service, and who have become incapacitated, 
may be retired and pensioned. 

♦These clauses, as they now stand, were adopted by the Board of Directors on December 11, 1901. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 81 

Sec. 3. — The monthly allowance paid each person granted a pension shall be upon 
the following basis: For each year of service 1 per cent of the average regular monthly 
pay for the ten years next preceding retirement; provided, however, that the annual 
pension disbursement of the company shall not exceed $200,000. Should the aggregate 
pension allowances exceed this amount, in the absence of action by the board of direct- 
ors increasing the yearly amount usable for pensions, a new rate shall be established 
proportionately reducing all allowances. Notice of any change of rate shall be given 
retired employes before the beginning of the fiscal year in which the change shall 
become effective. 

Sec. 4. — For the purposes of this plan the terms "service" and "in the service" 
refer and apply only to those who have given their entire time to the service of the 
company, it not being the intention of the board of directors to pension those who 
have only given a portion of their time to the company. Employes of the railways 
owned or controlled by the company shall be treated as employes of the parent com- 
pany, and the length of service of such employes shall include the time they have been 
employed by such railroads, whether prior or subsequent to their control or acquisition 
by the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company. 

Length of service shall be reckoned from the date of entry into the service to the date 
of relief, all intermediate time out of the service to be deducted, and any fractional 
part of a month to be eliminated from the final result. 

Sec. 5. — The retirement of employes seventy years of age shall be effective on the 
first day of the calendar month following that in which they shall have attained that 
age. 

The retirement of employes sixty-five to sixty-nine years of age, who have been 
approved for retirement, shall be effective on the first day of the calendar month there- 
after. 

Sec. 6. — Pension allowances shall be paid monthly, until the death of the benefi- 
ciary, provided, however, that the company may withhold its stipends in all cases of 
gross misconduct. 

Sec. 7. — The acceptance of a pension shall not debar any retired employe from 
engaging in any other business which is not prejudicial to the interests of the company, 
but he can not reenter its service. 

Sec. 8. — For the execution of the provisions governing the retirement and pen- 
sioning of employes, a pension board is created. It shall consist of five officers of the 
company, appointed by the board of directors, who shall serve one year and until their 
successors are selected. They shall elect their own chairman and secretary. The 
members of the pension board shall serve without increase of the compensation they 
receive as officers of the company. The pension board may adopt, subject to revision 
or veto by the president or board of directors, such by-laws as may be found necessary 
for the execution of the provisions of the pension system. The pension board is under 
the immediate direction of the president, to whom it shall render reports of its opera- 
tions in such form as he may stipulate whenever requested by him. 

Sec. 9. — No person over thirty-five years of age shall hereafter be taken into the 
service of the company; provided, however, that in the discretion of the president 
persons may be temporarily taken into the service, irrespective of age, for a period not 
exceeding six months, and that this period may be extended, if necessary, to com- 
plete the work for which such person was originally employed; provided, also, that, 
with the approval of the board of directors, persons may be employed indefinitely, 
irrespective of the age limit, where the service to be rendered requires professional 
or other special qualifications. 

Sec. 10. — Neither the action of the board of directors in establishing a system of 
pensions, nor any other action now or hereafter taken by them or by the pension board 
in the inauguration and operation of a pension system, shall be held or construed as 
giving to any officer, agent, or employe of the company a right to be retained in its 
service, or any right or claim to any pension allowance; and the company expressly 
reserves its right and privilege to discharge, at any time, any officer, agent or employe 
when the interests of the company, in its judgment, may so require, without liability 
for any claim for pension or other allowances other than salary or wages due and 
unpaid. 

The system will be put in operation January 1, 1901 by the pension board ap- 
pointed by the board of directors under Sec. 8 of the plan, consisting of the general 
manager general superintendent, superintendent of motive power and machinery, 
chief engineer, and the auditor of expenditures. At a later date fuller information 
in regard to the actual operation of the plan will be promulgated by the pension board. 



82 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

The attention of all officials of the company having power to employ men is espe- 
cially directed to Sec. 9, which limits the asre of new employes. 

By order of the board of directors. 

Marvin Hughitt, President. 
Office of the President, Chicago, December 22, 1900. 

THE PENSION BOARD 

As now organized, the pension board consists of the following persons: 
W. A. Gardner, General Manager; E. C. Carter, Chief Engineer; R. H. 
Aishton, Assistant General Manager; W. H. Stennett, Auditor of Expen- 
ditures; and Robert Quayle, Superintendent of Motive Power and 
Machinery. W. P. Turner is the Secretary of the Board. 

p The Pensioned 

Under this pension system three hundred and two (302) employes 
of the company have been pensioned to date; of those thus pensioned 
forty-three (43) have already died. 

FORTY-THIRD FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1901, to May 31, 1902 

In his report for this fiscal year the president reports the completion 
of the double track from Chicago to the Missouri River at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, 490 miles, and the completion of double tracking other parts of 
the road, so that there were finished and in use 797 miles of double 
track. A branch road from Pelican to Crandon, Wis., eighteen miles, 
was also finished this year, and also the following roads: 

Peoria & North-Western Railway 

"This railway extends from Nelson, 111., a station on the Galena Division of the 
Chicago & North- Western Railway, in a southerly direction to Peoria, 111., a distance of 
eighty-five miles. Its construction was commenced in March, 1901, and completed on 
January 19, 1902, on which date regular passenger and freight train service was estab- 
lished between its termini. * * * * 

Princeton & North-Western Railway 

"This railway begins at Princeton, Wis., and extends in a northwesterly direction 
to a connection with the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway at Marsh- 
field, Wis., with branches from Grand Rapids to Nekoosa, and from near Neshkoro 
to Red Granite, Wis., in all 100.42 miles. The work of construction was commenced 
in November, 1900, and the railway completed and opened for traffic as follows: 

Main Line, Princeton to Marshfield December 2, 1901 

Red Granite Branch September 2, 1901 

Nekoosa Branch March 3, 1902 

Minnesota Western Railway 

"At the annual meetings of the board of directors and stockholders of the Chicago 
& North-Western Railway Company, held in Chicago on June 5, 1902, all necessary 
proceedings were had to perfect the purchase of the Minnesota Western Railway (a 
railway under construction in the interest of this company), and the officers of the 
company were authorized and empowered to acquire title to said railway and to com- 
plete the union with this company by a proper and sufficient conveyance. 

"The Minnesota Western Railway is located wholly within the State of Minnesota, 
beginning at Evan, in Brown County, and extending in a general westerly direction 
through Redwood County to the town of Marshall, in Lyon County, a distance of 45.82 
miles. The work of construction was commenced in August, 1901, and is now nearing 
completion. * * * * 

Sioux City & Pacific Railroad 
" During the fiscal year covered by this report the Sioux City & Pacific Railroad 
(including its newly constructed extension from Sargent's Bluff to Moville, Iowa, twenty 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 83 

miles in length, which was completed in November, 1901) was purchased by the Chicago 
& North-Western Railway Company. This railroad is 127.42 miles in length, and 
extends from Sioux City, Iowa, to Fremont, Neb., from California Junction to Missouri 
Valley, Iowa, and from Sargent's Bluff to Moville, Iowa." * * * 

Mr. M. L. Sykes having resigned as one of the directors of the Chicago 
<fc North- Western Railway Company, the board of directors, at a meeting 
on December 11, 1902, passed the following resolution: 

"Resolved, That in accepting the resignation of Mr. M. L. Sykes from the board of 
directors of the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, we direct that a minute 
be entered upon the record expressing our regret that on account of age and long serv- 
ice Mr. Sykes desires to retire. For thirty-five years he has been an officer, and during 
that period we have likewise been associated with him as a director. He has rarely, 
if ever, been absent from a meeting of the board or executive committee. His intimate 
knowledge of the history of the company, of its extensions, acquisitions, and develop- 
ment, and close touch with the details of management during all these years have been 
of the greatest assistance in our deliberations. He has both witnessed and participated 
in the policy which has resulted in the growth and continued prosperity of our com- 
pany. He carries with him into his well-earned retirement the friendship of his as- 
sociates, and their best wishes for long years of health and happiness." 

Trans-Missouri Lines 
During this fiscal year the company completed an extension of its 
railway from Gayville (near Deadwood in the Black Hills) to the impor- 
tant commercial center of Lead City, S. D. 

FORTY-FOURTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1902, to May 31, 1903 

As to track elevation in Chicago, the president reports that 3£ miles 
of track had been elevated during the year. The Verdigre branch of 
the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad, from Verdigre, Neb., 
to Bonesteel, S. D., seventy miles, was completed and opened for traffic 
on November 18, 1902. "The Annex," a commodious brick structure, 
157 feet long, 58 feet wide, and two stories high, adjoining and becom- 
ing practically a portion of the Chicago Passenger Station, but especially 
for suburban passengers, was built and opened this year. 

Increase in Capital Stock 

"At a special meeting of the stockholders and voting bondholders of the company, 
held at its office in the city of Chicago on the tenth day of February, 1903, at which 
considerably more than two-thirds of its entire capital stock and voting bonds were 
represented, affirmative action was taken upon the question of increasing the authorized 
capital stock of the company by an amount of common stock sufficient to make the 
aggregate capital stock of the company one hundred million dollars ($100,000,000) par 
value, and of empowering the company's board of directors to issue its common stock 
from time to time and in such amounts as said board of directors may determine and 
for any purpose allowed by law. Pursuant to the authority thus conferred, the right 
to subscribe to such increased stock at par was accorded to the stockholders of record 
at the close of business on the 18th day of February, 1903, to the extent of 15 per cent 
of their respective holdings, and such subscriptions have resulted in an increase, in this 
fiscal year, of $9,226,110, in the amount of the company's outstanding common stock 
and scrip. 

"At this special meeting of the stockholders and voting bondholders affirmative 
action was also taken upon the question of acquiring all the railroad, franchises, and 
property of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad Company. In accordance 
therewith the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company entered into possession of 
all such railroad, franchises, and property on the 16th day of February, 1903. 

"The railroad of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad Company (now 
an integral part of the Chicago & North-Western Railway) is 1,372.85 miles in length; 
it begins at an intersection with this company's railway in the city of Fremont, Neb., 
and extends in a general northwesterly and westerly direction through the State of 



84 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

Nebraska to Casper, in the State of Wyoming. Its branches extend to the city of 
Omaha, South Omaha, Lincoln, Superior, Hastings and Albion, in the State of Nebraska; 
from Norfolk, Neb., to Bonesteel, S. D., and from Dakota Junction, Neb., to Hot Springs,. 
Rapid City, Deadwood, Lead, Belle Fourche, and other important points in and adjacent 
to the Black Hills, S. D.; it also owns and operates a system of narrow-gauge railways 
serving the mining districts of the Black Hills, beyond Deadwood." 

The Trans-Missouri corporation now passes out of existence and its 
road becomes a division of the Chicago & North-Western Railway proper. 

FORTY-FIFTH FISCAL YEAR— June i, 1903, to June 30, 1904 

The New General Office Building 
The company some months ago purchased a lot on the corner of 
Jackson Boulevard and Franklin Street in Chicago, and is now erecting 
on it a 14-story building for use as a general office building; C. S. Frost 
and A. H. Granger are the architects. It is expected it will be completed 
and occupied in the spring of 1905. It will be the largest and most 
commodious office building owned by any railroad company in Chicago. 

VIADUCTS IN CHICAGO 

In several of the reports mention is made of building viaducts over 
the tracks of the company in Chicago, and as it is believed this company 
took the lead in that work, it has been thought fit to record here what 
the company has done in that way. The earliest mention that is found 
was of a viaduct the city of Chicago proposed to build over the North- 
Western tracks where they cross State Street, and by agreement with 
the city, under elate of May 12, 1864, this viaduct was built. L nder 
similar or other contracts the following viaducts have been built and 
opened in the years mentioned: Halsted Street, 1870; Indiana Street, 
1870; Erie Street, 1872; Clark Street, 1873; Canal Street, 1874; Halsted 
Street (North), 1875; Blue Island Avenue, 1877; Milwaukee Avenue 
and Des Plaines Street, 1877; Sangamon Street, 1881; Chicago Avenue 
and Halsted Street, 1885; Center Avenue, 1885; Dearborn Avenue, 
1889 ; Ashland Avenue, 1889; Western Avenue, 1889 ; Ogden Avenue, 1892. 

These structures, when constructed, were supposed to be for all 
time, and that nothing further in the line of protecting the people against 
their own carelessness would ever be needed. Already, however, their 
doom has been pronounced, and track elevation is to take their place. 

THE BUILDING OF THE "CHICAGO SHOPS" 

Mention has already been made of the purchase of a large tract of 
ground west of the, then, Chicago city limits on which the shops of 
the company were to be built. Since that purchase the following shops 
have been erected and placed in use on that ground: 

Length Width 

in in 

Feet Feet 

Brick machine shop 552 x 120 

Brick machine-shop annex 150 x 100 

Brick boiler room shop 60 x 57 

Brick boiler shop 300 x 120 

Brick brass foundry 200 x 80 

Brick blacksmith shop 402 x 80 

Wood sand house 150 x 16 

Brick Galena Division roundhouse 720 x 84 

Wood Galena Division cold storage 307 x 28 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 85' 

Length Width 

in in 

Feel Feet 

Wood Galena Division coal chutes 200 x 30 

Brick Galena Division master mechanic's office 73 x 18 

Brick Wisconsin Division roundhouse 285 

Brick Wisconsin Division roundhouse 468 x 84 

Wood Wisconsin Division coal chutes 208 x 33 

Wood Galena Division coal chutes 208 x 33 

Brick locomotive paint shop 200 x 66 

Brick car shop 302 x 80 

Brick car shop 302 x SO 

Brick car shop 302 x 80 ; 

Brick upholstering department 302 x 80 

Brick car shop 302 x 80 

Brick car shop 302 x 80' 

Brick planing mill 308 x 80 

Brick blacksmith and machine shop 308 x 80 

Brick lumber storage 140 x 40 

Wood carpenter shop 72 x 24 

Brick blacksmith shop 308 x 80' 

Wood dry lumber shed 126 x 38 

Brick storehouse 300 x 50 

Brick storehouse 300 x 59 

Brick record building 200 x 50 

Iron oil house 145 x 50 

Brick paint mill 38 x 28 

Wood general storage 400 x 32 

Wood storage building 100 x 82 

Brick car erecting shop 485 x 103 

All of these shops are equipped with the most modern machinery 
and are run and lighted by electricity. 

In addition to these large buildings there are many smaller but equally 
substantial structures in use on the grounds. 

PAINT PLANT AND PAINT MAKING 

All of the paint used on all of its buildings, bridges, cars, and en- 
gines by the company on all parts of its lines is prepared by the chemist 
of the company in a specially arranged building on the Chicago shops 
ground. 

"Iron" paint is the standard for all outdoor structures. 

The iron ore for making this paint is mined in Wisconsin expressly 
for this company, and is shipped to this plant, where it is roasted, ground, 
blended, and mixed ready for use. The grinding of the roasted ore is 
done in a Cyclone pulverizer that reduces the ore to an impalpable pow- 
der, that is left without any grit whatever. 

Standards have also been fixed for all paints of all the colors used 
by the company, and all of them are manufactured in this plant under 
the direct supervision of the chemist of the company. 

THE SUMMING UP 

We have now brought this relation down to the close of the present 
fiscal year and have practically finished our task. To show the present 
status of the company, we present a lot of detail that can be accepted as 
a general summing up. The president, in his report for this year, said: 

"The fiscal year of the company having been changed by the board of directors 
to close on June 30th instead of May 31st, * * * this report is made to include 



86 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

the thirteen months from the end of the previous fiscal vear (Mav 31, 1903) to the end 
of the new fiscal year (June 30, 1904). * * * " 

Details of Income Account for the Twelve Months Ending June 30, 1904. 
Average number of miles operated for twelve months, 7,403.97. 
Gross Earnings for Twelve Months. 

From passengers $13,027,708.46 

From freight. _ 37,254,538.88 

From express, mail, and miscellaneous 3,052,386.52 

Total gross earnings for twelve months $53,334,633.86 

Operating Expenses and Taxes for Twelve Months. 
Operating expenses (66 35-100 per cent of gross 

earnings) $35,389,303.96 

Taxes 1,837,805.33 



37,227,109.29 

Interest on bonds and interest (including a full 
year's interest on Fremont, Elkhorn & Mis- 
souri Valley Railroad bonds) was $7,035,718.26 

The dividends, viz.: 8 per cent on preferred stock and 7 percent 
on common stock (including a full year's dividend on the 
increase in capital stock, as against a half year's dividend 
for the preceding year) were 5,174,924.00 

MILES OF RAILROAD Miles. 

The total number of miles of railroad owned June 20, 1904, was 7,310.2-1 

In addition to which the company operated: 
Under Lease — 

St. Paul, Eastern Grand Trunk (Clmtonville, Wis., to Oconto, 

Wis., and branches) 60.02 

DePue, Ladd & Eastern Railway (Ladd, 111., to Seatonville, 

111.) ' 3.25 



63.27 



Under Trackage Rights — 

Peoria & Pekin Union Railway (in the city of Peoria, 111.). . 2.02 
Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railroad (Churchill, 111., to Ladd, 

111.) 2.80 

Union Pacific Railroad (Broadway Station, Council Bluffs, 

Iowa, to South Omaha, Neb.) 8.73 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway (Blair, 

Neb , to Omaha, Neb.) 24.70 



3S.25 



Total number of miles operated June 30, 1904 7,411.77 

The above mileage is located as follows: 

Miles. 

In Illinois 685.02 

In Wisconsin 1,778.65 

In Michigan 521.19 

In Iowa 1,581.24 

In Minnesota 650.30 

In South Dakota 948.36 

In North Dakota 14.28 

In Nebraska 1,102.27 

In Wyoming 130.46 



7,411.77 



The company had in operation June 30, 1904, in addition to the above, 843.46 miles 
of second, third, and fourth main track, and 2,592.97 miles of sidings and yard tracks, 
making a total mileage of all tracks, both owned and operated, of 10,848.20 miles. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 87 

CAPITAL STOCK 

The company's authorized capital stock is one hundred million dollars ($100,000,000), 
of which the following has been issued to June 30, 1904: 

Preferred stock and scrip, outstanding $22,395,120.00 

Preferred stock and scrip, owned by the company. . . . 3,834.56 



Total preferred stock and scrip $22,398,954.56 

Common stock and scrip, outstanding $48,336,062.92 

Common stock and scrip, owned by the company. . . . 2,338,413.05 

Total common stock and scrip 50,674,475.97 



Total capital stock and scrip, June 30, 1904 $73,073,430.53 

PASSENGER TRAFFIC 

The details of passenger earnings and traffic for the twelve months ending June 30, 
1904, compared with the preceding twelve months, were as follows: 

1903 1904 

Passenger earnings $12,161,997.00 $13,027,708.46 

Passengers carried 20,258,553 21 ,395,31 2 

Total number of passengers carried one mile 602,794 276 645,075,111 

FREIGHT TRAFFIC 

The details of freight traffic for the twelve months ending June 30, 1904, compared 
with the preceding twelve months, were as follows: 

1903 1904 Am*. Increase 

Freight earnings $35,811,007.74 $37,254,538.88 $1,443,531.00 

Tons of freight carried 30,498,440 28,128,810 

Tons of freight carried one mile 4,042,788,811 4,066,140,935 

TRACK ELEVATION IN CHICAGO 

The elevation of the Mayfair Cut-Off between Chicago and Milwaukee avenues, 
referred to in the last annual report, is being completed by the elevation of the section 
between Chicago Avenue and North Avenue, which will be finished this year. * * * 

The work of elevating the Galena Division main tracks in Kinzie Street, from Ada 
Street to Kedzie Avenue, a distance of 2.4 miles, has been commenced, and will, when 
completed, give a much-needed four-track system from Chicago shops (West Fortieth 
Street) to Ada Street, and a three-track system from Ada Street to the junction of the 
Galena and Wisconsin divisions just west of the Wells Street passenger station. * * * 
This work will make the elevation of the Galena Division tracks continuous from Ada 
Street to West Fortieth Street. 

TRACK ELEVATION IN MILWAUKEE 

An agreement for the elevation of 1.6 miles of the Madison Division in Milwaukee 
has been entered into, the work to be commenced when the city shall have completed 
certain arrangements with the government for the change in the channel of the Kinnic- 
kinnic River. * * * 

TRACK DEPRESSION IN MILWAUKEE 

Under an agreement with the city of Milwaukee this company last year commenced 
the depression of its tracks in the Eighteenth Ward, from a point south of La Fayette 
Place to a point north of Folsom Place, a distance of 2.08 miles, the maximum depres- 
sion being nineteen feet below the original level at North Avenue. 

This work will, by the construction of viaducts, eliminate eight grade crossings of 
streets, on two of which there is a heavy electric street-car traffic. The crossings of 
three other streets included in this territory are vacated. In connection with this 
work there is under construction a third track, which will extend from the Wisconsin 
Street Depot, Milwaukee, through the depression to Lake Shore Junction, where the 
Ashland Division joins the Wisconsin Division, a distance of 3.47 miles. Both of these 
pieces of work will be completed this year, and will relieve the company of the diffi- 
culties heretofore experienced in entering and leaving the city on the north. 



88 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

NEW RAILWAYS AND EXTENSIONS 

The congestion caused by the freight and passenger traffic in the suburban district 
from Evanston to Lake Forest has for some time indicated the necessity for third and 
fourth tracks for economical operation. A careful investigation of the problem devel- 
oped the fact that these tracks could be constructed on an independent line in the 
Skokie Valley and located from two to three miles west of the main line with its populous 
suburbs, thus avoiding the delays and dangers incident to the operation of trains on 
adjoining tracks while suburban trains were receiving and discharging passengers, 
and also the risks incident to the numerous grade crossings in these suburbs, which 
would be multiplied by the additional tracks. The third and fourth tracks were there- 
fore constructed from a point on the Mayfair-Evanston Cut-Off, just north of the cross- 
ing of the north branch of the Chicago River, to a junction with the main line of the 
Milwaukee Division at Lake Bluff, a distance of 22.22 miles. * * * Since these 
tracks have been in operation the economy and relief have been marked, and will be 
greater in the future. * * * 

The branch line from Eland Junction to Elderon has been extended from the latter 
point to Rosholt, a distance of 11.62 miles. 

The Chicago, Iowa & Dakota Railway, extending from Eldora Junction, Iowa, 
to Alden, Iowa, a distance of 26.40 miles, was acquired by purchase during the year, 
and is now a part of the company's Northern Iowa Division. 

TIMBER-PRESERVING PLANT 

A modern timber-preserving plant for the treatment of track ties by the zinc-tannin 
process has been completed and fully equipped at Escanaba, Mich., this location being 
convenient to the sources of supply. It has a capacity for the treatment of one million 
ties per year, and is provided with all the necessary storage and working tracks re- 
quired for economical operation. The increasing price of track ties, together with 
their comparatively short life, has made this investment a necessity. 

PURIFYING WATER FOR LOCOMOTIVES 

Plants for treatment of water for locomotive use have been constructed at Mis- 
souri Valley, Iowa, and Spring Valley, 111., and elsewhere, and are in satisfactory opera- 
tion. 

EQUIPMENT OF ENGINES AND CARS 

The equipment owned and on hand June 30, 1904, is as follows: 

Number of engines 1,307 

First-class passenger cars 571 Milk cars 51 

Parlor cars 32 Boarding cars for men 34 

Chair cars 44 Box freight cars 27,402 

Buffet and cafe cars 15 Refrigerator cars 1,209 

Dining cars 14 Ballast cars 254 

Second-class passenger cars 48 Gondola cars 8,894 

Combination cars 130 Platform cars 4,538 

Baggage and express cars 198 Live-stock cars 4,075 

Mail cars 62 Ore cars 4,505 

Officers and directors' cars 6 Pile-driving, excavator, etc., cars. 54 

Caboose cars 667 Rotary snow plows 4 

Total number of cars 52,807 

DIRECTORS AND OPERATING STAFF JUNE 30, 1904 

The directory and principal officers and operating staff on June 30, 1904, were 
as follows: 

Directors — Term expires 1904: Marvin Hughitt, Chicago; Frank Work, New York; 
James Stillman, New York; Oliver Ames, Boston; Zenas Crane, Dalton, Mass. Term 
expires 1905: W. K. Vanderbilt, New York; F. W. Vanderbilt, New York; H. McK. 
Twombly, New York; Byron L. Smith, Chicago; Cyrus H. McCormick, Chicago; Mar- 
shall Field, Chicago. Term expires 1906: Albert Keep, Lake Geneva, Wis.; Chauncey 
M. Depew, New York; Samuel F. Barger, New York; James C. Fargo New York; 
Henry C. Frick, Pittsburgh, Pa.; David P. Kimball, Boston. 

Executive Committee — Marvin Hughitt, H. McK. Twombly, Chauncey M. Depew, 
David P. Kimball, Samuel F. Barger, W. K. Vanderbilt, Marshall Field, James C. 
Fargo. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



S9 



Officers — Marvin Hughitt, president, Chicago; Eugene E. Osborn, vice-president 
and secretary. New York; M. M. Kirkman, second vice-president, Chicago; Hiram R. 
McCullough, third vice-president, Chicago; John M. Whitman, fourth vice-president, 
Chicago; S. O. Howe, treasurer and assistant secretary, New York; R. H. Williams, 
assistant treasurer and second assistant secretary, New York; J B. Redfield, auditor 
and assistant secretary, Chicago; Lloyd W. Bowers, general counsel, Chicago; W. H. 
Stennett, auditor of expenditures, Chicago; William A. Gardner, general manager, 
Chicago; Richard H. Aishton, assistant general manager, Chicago; Marvin Hughitt, 
Jr., freight traffic manager, Chicago; Edmund D. Brigham, general freight agent, Chi- 
cago; Warren B. Kniskern, passenger traffic manager, Chicago; Charles A. Cairns, 
general passenger and ticket agent, Chicago; William D. Cantillon, general superintend- 
ent, Chicago; Edward C. Carter, chief engineer, Chicago; Lester S. Carroll, purchasing 
agent, Chicago; Josiah F. Cleveland, land commissioner, Chicago; Frank P. Crandon, tax 
commissioner, Chicago; Robert Quayle, superintendent motive power and machinery, 
Chicago; George F. Bidwell, manager Nebraska and Wyoming division, Omaha; Thomas 
A. Lawson, assistant general superintendent, Chicago; Charles C. Hughes, general 
superintendent Nebraska and Wyoming division, Norfolk; John E. Blunt, consulting 
engineer, Chicago; Thomas S. Rattle, assistant general freight agent, Chicago; Charles 
H. Knapp, assistant general freight agent, Chicago; Edward J. Seymour, assistant 
general freight agent, Chicago; Frank P. Eyman, assistant general freight agent, 
Chicago; Samuel F. Miller, assistant general freight agent, Chicago; John A. Kuhn ; 
assistant general freight and passenger agent, Omaha; Samuel A. Lynde, general attor- 
ney, Chicago; John L. Ferguson, assistant general passenger and ticket agent, 
Chicago; Ralph C. Richards, general claim agent, Chicago; Geo. W. Dailey, acting 
superintendent of telegraph, Chicago; John E. Owens, M. D., chief surgeon, Chicago; 
Charles A. Schroyer, superintendent car department, Chicago; Frank D Taylor, general 
baggage agent, Chicago; Frank M. Luce, auditor car mileage, Chicago; James O. Clif- 
ford, freight auditor, Chicago; William F. Van Bergen, ticket auditor, Chicago; Richard 
Matters, superintendent of dining and parlor cars, Chicago; Geo. M. Davidson, chemist 
and engineer of tests, Chicago; Win. P. Turner, secretary of the Pension Board, 
Chicago. 

THE MEN WHO MADE THE ROAD 

A LIST OF THE DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 

AND THE MANAGING AND OPERATING STAFFS WITH 

DATE OF ELECTION OR APPOINTMENT 

From the organization of the company to December 31, 1904 
DIRECTORS 



No. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 



Name 



Ogden, W. B 

Smith, P. H 

Hutchings, E. W... 

Butler, Chas 

Perkins, T. H 

Ogden, Mahlon D. . 
Coventry, A. C . . . . 

Smith, Henry 

Young, J. R 

Pease/ J. J. R 

Darling, M. C 

Winslow, Albert. . . 
Bartholomew, G. M 

Boodv, H. H 

Langlev, W. C 



From 



June 6, 
June 6, 
June 6, 
June 6, 
June 6, 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 8 
June 8 



1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1S59 
1859 
1859 



To 



June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
Nov. 
Aug. 
June 
June 
June 
June 



4, 1S68 
3, 1869 
7, 1860 

6, 1S61 

7, 1860 

8, 1859 
8, 1S59 
8, 1859 
7. 1S60 

17, 1865 

18. 1864 

6, 1861 
2, 1864 
2, 1864 

7, 1860 



90 


HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH 


-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 


DIRECTORS— Continued 


No. 


Name 


From To 



Edgarr, J. A 

Pritchard, A. L 

Miller, L. M 

Maxwell, John 

Booth, W. A 

Perkins, T. H. (second time) 

Dyckman, W. H 

Dows, David 

Holbrook, Lowell 

Seyton, C. S 

Baldwin, Austin 

Smith, George 

Dunlap, G. L 

Fish, J. D 

Wood, J. A 

Scott, W. B 

Elwell, J. W 

Tilden. Samuel J 

Ferry, W. H 

Turner, J. B 

Robertson, T. D 

Boody, H. H. (second time) 

Holbrook, Lowell (second time) . . 

Booth, W. A. (second time) 

Bartholomew, G. M. (second time) 
Pritchard, A. L. (second time). . 

Burke, J. M _ 

Nathan, Benjamin 

Rumsey, Julian S 

Fish, J. D. (second time) 

Scott, W. B. (second time) 

Sloan, Sam 

Iselin, Adrain 

Sykes, M. L 

Keep, Henry 

Baxter, H. H 

Scott, G. S 

Benedict, J. H 

Bloodgood, John 

James, F. P 

Gurnee, W. S 

Sage, Russell 

Mitchell, Alex 

Pierson, H. R 

Dulman, A. G 

Ten Have Frzn, J. L 

Turner, J. B. (second time) .... 



June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Nov. 23 

June 6 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Feb. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 2 

June 11 

Juno 11 

June 11 

June 11 

June 11 

Aug. IS 

June 

June 

June 

Nov. 

June 

June 

July 22 

Nov. 25 

May 15 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

April 

June 

June 

June 



1 
1 
2 

17 
6 

C) 



1859 
I860 
1860 
1860 
1S60 
1860 
1860 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1S62 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1S64 
1864 
1864 
1S64 
1864 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1868 
1868 
186S 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 



June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Nov. 

June 

June 

June 

Feb. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

April 

June 

May 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Nov. 

July 

June 

June 

Nov. 

July 

March 10 

June 3 

Oct. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Oct. 

June 



3 
6 
6 
2 

23 
6 
5 
2 

18 

4 
4 

1 
1 
2 

1 
4 
4 
3 
7 
6 
15 
4 
4 
6 
4 
5 
2 

2 
25 
22 
~3 

4 
11 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 91 



DIRECTORS— Continued 



Name 



Williams, J. E Sept. 

Robinson, Alanson Oct. 

Marvin. C.R June 

Kennedy, Harvey June 

Bavlis, A. B June 

Scott, W. I June 

Courtright, M June 

Flower, R. P June 

Porter, H. H June 

Tracy, John F June 

Dows, David (second time) June 

Tows, F. H June 

Ferry, W. H. (second time) June 

Allen, B. F June 

Keep, Albert June 

Mills, S. M June 3 

Howe, J. H June 3 

Bloodgood, Jno. (second time) . . . June 1 

Gould, Jay March 3 

Ferry, W. H. (third time) March 3 

Dillon, Sidney March 3 

Ames, Oliver March 3 

Burke, J. M. (second time) June 7 

Hughitt, Marvin June 7 

Jones, David June 6 

Smith, P. H. (second time) June 6 

Work, Frank June 6 

Osborn, C. J \ June 6 

Morgan, D. P June 6 

Schell, Aug June 5 

Depew, Chauncey M June 5 

Barger, S. F June 5 

Mills, D. O June 3 

Stager, Anson June 2 

Yanderbilt, F. W June 2 

Fairbank, N. K June 7 

Twomblv, H. McK June 5 

Redfield, J. B June 5 

Yanderbilt, W. K Sept. 27 

Williams, Horace Sept. 27 

Kimball, D. P Sept. 27 

Blair, John 1 June 4 

Pyne, P. R June 3 

Ames, F. L June 6 

Fargo, James C j June 4 

Smith, Byron L j June 2 

Ames, Oliver 2d I June 7 



From 



869 

869 
870 

870 
870 
870 
870 

870 
870 
870 
871 

871 
871 

871 
873 
875 
875 
876 
877 
877 
877 
877 
877 
877 
878 
878 
878 
878 
878 
879 
879 
879 
S80 
881 
881 
883 
884 
884 
884 
884 
884 
885 
886 
889 
891 
892 
894 



To 



June 



March 3, 
June 6, 



June 
Sept. 
June 
June 
June 



7, 
19, 
1, 
5, 
6, 



March 3, 

June 7, 

March 3, 

March 3, 

June 3, 



June 
June 
June 



(1. 
6, 
6, 



Sept, 27, 

June 5, 

Sept. 27, 

June 7, 

June 6, 



June 
June 
June 
Nov. 
June 



3, 

5, 

9 

11, 
9 



March 27, 



June 6, 



Nov. 
Sept. 
Aug. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Sept. 



* 
11, 

27, 
* 

14, 
* 

2 

14; 

13, 

* 

* 

* 



1870 
IS 70 
1877 
IS 78 
1877 
1S91 
1876 
1884 
1878 
1S77 
1883 
1877 
1877 
IS 75 

1878 
1878 
1878 
1884 
1879 
1884 
1877 
1895 

1880 
1879 

1881 
1885 
1881 
1884 



1889 

1885 

1902 

1884 

1894 

1899 
1895 
1893 



* Shows the position is still held by the party indicated 



92 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



DI RECTO RS— Continued 



No. 



Name 



From 



To 



95 
96 
97 
98 
99 



McCormick, C. H 

Stillman, Jas 

Crane, Zenas 

Field, Marshall 

Frick, H. C 

Work, Frank (second time) 



June 6, 1895 

June 6, 1895 

June 6, 1895 

Dec. 8. 1899 

Nov. 11, 1902 

Nov. 11, 1902 



CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Albert Keep I June 2, 1887 | Dec. 11, 1901 

PRESIDENTS 



William B. Ogden. 

Henry Keep 

Alex. Mitchell. . . . 
John F. Tracy. . . . 

Albert Keep 

Marvin Hughitt. . . 



June 
June 
Sept. 
June 



7, 1859 
4, 1868 
1, 1869 
3, 1870 
June 19, 1873 
June 2, 1887 



June 
July 
June 
June 
June 



4, 1868 
— 1869 

3, 1870 
19, 1873 

2, 1887 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 



Perry H. Smith. . . 
Henry R. Pierson. 

M. L* Svkes 

E. E. Osborn 



June 7, 1859 
April 7, 1869 
June 30, 1870 
June 6, 1901 



April 7, 1869 

June 30, 1870 

June 6, 1901 
* 





SECOND VICE-PRESIDENTS 








M. L. Svkes 

Marvin Hughitt 

M. M. Kirkman 


July 22, 1S67 
June 3, 1880 
Nov. 1, 1889 


June 
June 


30, 

2, 

* 


1870 

1887 


THIRD VICE-PRESIDENTS 


W. H. Newman 

H. G. Burt 

H. R. McCullough 


Nov. 1, 1889 
Oct, 1, 1896 
Jan. 1, 1898 


Sept. 
Dec. 


12, 
31, 

* 


1896 
1897 


FOURTH VICE-PRESIDENTS 


John M. Whitman.. 


I Dec. 1, 1899 




* 






SECRETARIES 









Charles Butler. . . 
James R. Young 
A. L. Pritchard. . 
Chas. R. Marvin. 
M. L. Sykes. . . 
E. E. Osborn. 



♦Shows the position is still held by the party indicated. 



June 7, 1859 
Aug. 25, 1859 
Dec. 31, 1868 
Oct. 31, 1872 
June 30, 1873 
June 6, 1901 



Aug. 
Dec. 
Oct. 
June 
June 



25, 1859 
31, 1868 
31, 1872 
30, 1873 
6, 1901 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



93 





ASSISTANT SECRETARIES 






Name 


From 


To 


J. B. Redfield 

S. 0. Howe 


June 7, 1859 
June 19, 1873 


* 

* 








TREASURERS 



E. W. Hutchins 
Geo. P. Lee ... . 
A. L. Pritchard . 
C. R. Marvin . . . 
M. L. Sykes . . . . 
S. O. Howe ... . 



June 7, 1859 
June 7, 1860 
April 2, 1866 
Oct. 31, 1872 
June 30, 1873 
June 2, 1898 



June 7, 1860 
April 2, 1866 
Oct. 31, 1872 
June 30, 1873 
June 2, 1898 
* 



ASSISTANT TREASURERS 




Geo. P. Lee 


Dec. 7, 1859 
Dec. 11, 1868 
June 19, 1873 
Nov. 24, 1883 
June 2, 1898 


June 7 1860 


Geo. P. Lee (second time) 

S. O. Howe 


June 2, 1870 
June 2 1898 


J. B. Redfield 


* 




* 







AUDITOR 



J. B. Redfield June 7, 1859 



AUDITOR OF EXPENDITURES 
*W. H. Stennett 1887 

GENERAL MANAGERS 

Geo. L. Dunlap 1870 H.H.Porter 1874 J.M.Whitman 1887 

James H. Howe 1872 Marvin Hughitt 1876 *W. A. Gardner 1899 

ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGERS AND ASSISTANTS TO GENERAL MANAGERS 

C.C.Wheeler 1881 S.Sanborn 1899 *R. H. Aishton. . 19(P 

W. H. Stennett 1884 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENTS 

Geo. L. Dunlap 1864 J. S. Oliver 1880 S. Sanborn 1887 

J. C. Gault 1870 J. D. Layng 1881 R. H. Aishton 1898 

Marvin Hughitt 1872 C. C. Wheeler 1883 *W. D. Cantillon 1902 

ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENTS 

J. C. Gault 1869 W. S. Mellen 1885 W. D. Cantillon. . . 1902 

S. Sanborn 1883 P. Hallenbeck 1887 *T. A. Lawson 1902 

W. B. Linsley 1883 W. A. Gardner 1896 

NEBRASKA AND WYOMING DIVISION 

*G. F. Bidwell, Manager 1903 *C. C. Hughes, General Superintendent 1903 

*B. T. White, General Attorney 1897 *A. A. Schenck, Engineer 1903 

DIVISION SUPERINTENDENTS 



J. B. Watkins 1873 

A. A. Hobart 1873 

J. H. Stewart 1873 

S. C. Baldwin 1873 

E. J. Cuyler 1873 

C. A. Swineford 1874 

*W. B. Linsley 1874 

S. Sanborn 1874 

J. B. Mullikin 1874 

J. S. Oliver 1874 

Chas. Murray 1877 

Otto Miller 1889 

J. J. Smart 1879 

L. A. Emerson 1879 

J. B. Trull 1880 

J. M. Whitman 1880 

T. J. Nichols 1880 



H. G. Burt 1881 

Chas. Gorham 1881 

W. P. Cosgrave 1883 

W. F. Fitch 1883 

M. Hopkins 1883 

Peter Hallenbeck 1893 

T. A. Lawson 1896 

W. D. Hodge 1897 

H. M. Hughes 1888 

R. H. Aishton 1897 

*W. E. Morse 1898 

W. D. Cantillon 1899 

*S. M. Braden 1899 

H. J. Slifer 1899 

*E. G. Schevenell 1902 

*H. W. Battin 1902 



H. R. Sanborn 1902 

*F. R. Pechin 1902 

*W. H. Whalen 1902 

J. C. Stuart 1892 

W. A. Gardner 1890 

G. F. Bidwell 1887 

*C. H. Hartley 1896 

*C. H. Reynolds 1891 

*H. C. Mahanna 1889 

*F. E. Harmon 1898 

R. A. Cowan 1889 

*G. J. Quigley 1903 

*W. D. Beck 1902 

*F. Walters 1903 

*0. H. McCarthy 1903 

*H. C. Stuart 1904 



* Shows the position is still held by the party indicated. 



94 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF DINING CARS 

J. H. Shattuck 1881 John Shearson 1891 E. A. Kellogg 1902 

J. D. Heckman 1885 W. M. Wells 1899 *R. Matters 1902 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF TELEGRAPH 
Geo. Bliss 1864 *G. H. Thayer 1873 *G. W. Dailey, acting 1903 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF MOTIVE POWER AND MACHINERY! 

Horatio Anderson 1861 William Smith 1890 

G. F. Tilton 1886 *Robt. Quayle 1894 

GENERAL TRAFFIC MANAGERS 
H. C. Wicker 1881 H. R. McCullough 1896 

FREIGHT TRAFFIC MANAGERS 
H. C. Wicker 1880 *M. Hughitt, Jr 1900 

PASSENGER TRAFFIC MANAGER 

* W. B. Kniskern 1902 

GENERAL FREIGHT AGENTS 

C S Tappan 1864 H. C. Wicker 1875 H. R. McCullough 1885 

J C Gault 1869 C. G. Eddv 1879 M. Hughitt, Jr 1896 

C. C. Wheeler 1870 W. S. Mellen 1882 *E. D. Brigham 1900 

ASSISTANT GENERAL AND DIVISION FREIGHT AGENTS 

C M Wicker A. G. F. A 1873 Emmons Blaine, Div. Frt. Agt 1884 

W \ Carpenter, A. G. F. A 1873 Burton Johnson, Div. Frt. Agt 1885 

Chas G Eddv, A. G. F. A 1876 Marvin Hughitt, Jr., Div. Frt. Agt 1886 

*C H. Knapp, A. G. F. A 1878 E. D. Brigham, Div. Frt. Agt 1888 

C V McKindlev, Div. Frt. Agt 1879 C. L. Wellington, A. G. F. A 1893 

W S Mellen A. G. F. A 1879 *E. J. Seymour, A. G. F. A 1893 

H ' R. "McCullough, Div. Frt. Agt 1879 *T. S. Rattle, A. G. F. A 1896 

R. H. Wvman, Div. Frt. Agt 1880 *F. P. Eyman, A. G. F. A 1900 

H. C. Barlow, Div. Frt. Agt 1881 *S. F. Miller, A. G. F. A 1902 

Peter Hallenbeck, Div. Frt. Agt 1882 *J. A. Kuhn, A. G. F. A 1903 

E. J. Foster Div. Frt. Agt 1883 

GENERAL TICKET AGENTS 

E. Dewitt Robinson 1862 H. P. Stanwood 1869 W. A. Thrall 1872 

GENERAL PASSENGER AGENTS 

B.F.Patrick 1864 W. H. Stennett 1873 E P.Wilson 1887 

H. P. Stanwood 1869 Robert Hair 1884 

GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET AGENTS 

W. A. Thrall 1890 W. B. Kniskern 1895 *C. A. Cairns 1903 

GENERAL COUNSEL 

James H. Howe 1864 W. C. Goudy 1886 

Burton C. Cook " 1871 *L. W. Bowers 1893 

GENERAL ATTORNEYS 

\ W Harrington 1S73 A. W. Pulver 1895 E. E. Osborn 1894 

W. B. Keep 1887 C. S. Darrow 1891 *S. A. Lynde 1901 

CHIEF ENGINEERS 

E B Talcott 1S64 E. H. Johnson 1872 J. E. Blunt 1889 

S. M. Seymour 1865 H. G. Burt 1887 *E. C. Carter 1899 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

E. H. Johnson 1887 *J. E. Blunt 1899 

CHEMIST AND ENGINEER OF TESTS 

*Geo. M. Davidson 18S6 

PURCHASING AGENTS 

Aim Thayer 1S64 Jas. H. Carpenter 1876 *L. S. Carroll 1901 

R. W. Hamer 1871 Chas. Hayward 1889 

LAND COMMISSIONERS 

G. P. Goodwin 1S72 C. E. Simmons 1878 *J. F. Cleveland 1897 

GENERAL CLAIM AGENTS 

E. W. Winter 1873 W. F. Fitch 1876 *R. C. Richards 1882 

GENERAL BAGGAGE AGENTS 

J. B. Clock. . .'. 1873 N. A. Phillips 1874 *F. D. Taylor 1901 

TICKET AUDITORS 

N M. Turner 1875 0. P. Convis 1880 *W. F. Van Bergen 1882 

N. C. Valentine 18S0 M. A. Buck 1881 

*Shows the position is still held by the party indicated. 1The title varied up to 1886. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTII-W KSTKRN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



95 



C. B. Schenk 1874 



S F. M. Luce 



FREIGHT AUDITORS 

W. S. Hart well 1880 

CAR ACCOUNTANTS 



*J. O. Clifford 1887 



1880 



TAX COMMISSIONER 
*F. P. Crandon 1887 

MASTER CAR BUILDERS 

(Under various titles, part for whole road ami part for divisions only) 

Thomas Hull 1864 William Campbell 1X74 *('. A. Schrover 1888 

Hugh Gray 1864 Henry Hull 1864 



OFFICERS OF THE "ELKHORN" AND "SIOUX CITY" BEFORE THEIR CON- 
SOLIDATION WITH THE NORTH WESTERN 



John I. Blair, President 1864 

L. Burnett, Superintendent 1870 

F. C. Hills, Superintendent 1877 

P. E. Hall, General Manager 1877 

J. E. Ainsworth, Chief Engineer 1878 

J. S. Walters, Superintendent 1881 

K. C. Morehouse, General Freight Agent. . . 1881 

J. R. Buchanan, General Ticket Agent 1881 

C. M. Lawler, General Superintendent. . . .1882 



L. Burnett, Chief Engineer 1864 

Marvin Hughitt. President 1884 

W. B. Linsley, General Manager 1884 

W. F. Fitch, General Manager 1886 

J. B. Hawley, General Counsel 1886 

H. G. Burt, General Manager 1888 

W. B. Sterling, General Counsel 1895 

John B. Berry, Chief Engineer 1895 

G. F. Bidwell, General Manager 1896 



CONSTRUCTION 

The Chicago & North-Western Proper 

On the preceding pages we have given the general history of the construction of 
the road in gross. Below we give the same in detail. We show the years in which 
the building was done, the stations that were connected each year, the miles built, 
and the corporate name of the roads under which the construction was carried on. In 
this table can be found the story of construction of every mile of road that was built 
from 1848 to December 31, 1904: 



When 
Built 



1848 
1849 
1852 
1853 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1862 
1864 
1870 
1860 
1864 
1854 
1854 
1855 
1859 
1859 
1861 
1862 
1879 
1871 
1S72 
1870 

1872 
1872 
1864 
1873 
1883 
1886 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1865 



TERMINI 



From 



To 



Chicago 

Harlem 

Elgin 

Rockford 

Belvidere 

Turner Junction. . . . 

Dixon 

Chicago (2d track) . . 

Kenosha 

Escanaba 

Winona Junction. . . 

Beloit 

Magnolia 

Chicago 

Minnesota Junction 

Cary 

Janesville 

Fond du Lac 

Oshkosh 

Appleton 

Ext. to Appleton. . . 

Fort Howard 

Marinette 

Negaunee 

Various branches to 

Chicago 

Geneva 

South Branch Jet . . 

Madison 

Batavia 

Winona Junction. . . 

Clinton 

Wheatland 

Lisbon 

East end of Bridge o 
West end of Bridge 



Harlem 

Elgin 

Rockford 

Freeport 

Beloit 

Dixon 

Fulton 

Turner Junction. . . . 

Rockford 

Negaunee 

Winona 

Magnolia 

Madison 

Cary 

Fond du Lac 

Janesville 

Minnesota Junction 

Oshkosh 

Appleton 

Fort Howard 

Water Power 

Marinette 

Escanaba 

Lake Angeline 

M ines 

Montrose 

Batavia 

Chicago River 

Winona Junction. . . 

Aurora 

La Crosse 

Wheatland 

Lisbon 

Cedar Rapids 

ver Miss. River 

over Miss. River. . . . 



Miles 



10.00 

33 . 00 

50.00 

28.00 

20.10 

68.00 

39.00 

30.00 

72.10 

62.00 

29.00 

17.00 

31.80 

38.50 

29.00 

52.30 

57.00 

17.00 

20.00 

28.40 

3.63 

49.45 

64.65 

4.58 

42.27 

5.20 

3.20 

4.50 

129.10 

6.20 

3.96 

44.00 

20.00 

17.30 

1.10 



Built by 



Galena & Chicago Union Railroad Company 



Dixon Rockford & Kenosha Railroad Co. 
Peninsula Railroad Company of Michigan 
La Crosse, Trempealeau & Prescott R. R. Co. 
Beloit & Madison Railroad Company 

Illinois & Wisconsin Railroad Company 
Rock River Valley Union Railroad Company 
Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac R. R. Co. 
Chicago & North-Western Railway Company 



Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad 



Albany Bridge Company 

Chicago & North- Western Railway Company 



*Shows the position is still held by the party indicated. 



96 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



COX STRUCTIO X— Continued 



When 
Built 



1861 
1862 
1864 
1865 
1867 
1870 
1877 
1879 
1883 
1874 
1878 
1855 
1855 
1873 
1859 
1860 
1868 
1871 
1874 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1854 
1871 
1871 
1877 
1880 
1882 
1882 

i880 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1880 
1886 
1872 
1871 
1881 
1882 
1884 
1884 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1874 
1880 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1881 
1882 
1881 
1882 
1886 
1859 
1885 
1864 
1867 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1870 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1879 
1879 

ISM I 

1881 
1882 
1882 



TERMINI 



From 



Cedar Rapids 

Chelsea 

Marshall 

Nevada 

Boone 

Clinton 

Maple River Junct.. 

Wall Lake 

Sac City 

Des Moines 

Ames 

Chicago 

Wisconsin State line 

Milwaukee 

Sheboygan 

Plymouth 

Glenbeulah 

Fond du Lac 

Galena 

Phillip's Corners . . . 

Woodman 

Dancliff Junction. . . 

Montfort 

Madison 

Milwaukee 

Elgin 

Genoa 

Geneva 

Powers 

Quinnesec 

Florence 

Iron River Junction 
Branches to Mines. . 

State Line 

Narenta 

Branches to Mines.. 

Trempealeau 

Janesville 



Stanwood 

Lyons 

Carroll 

Manning 

Belle Plaine 

Muchakinock 

Mapleton 

Kingsley ■■•,■■ 

Cut-off near Cedar 

Boone 

Tama 

Toledo 

Webster City 

Eagle Grove. 

Jewell Junction. . . . 

Eagle Grove 

Willow Glen. 

Jewell Junction 

Stratford 

Lake City 

Cortland 

Belvidere 

Winona 

Rochester 

Waseca 

Janesville 

St. Peter 

New Ulm 

Mankato Junction. . 

Sleepy Eye 

Rochester 

Eyota 



Tracy 

Dakota Line 

Volga 

Ordway Junction. . 

Ordway 

Watertown 



To 



Chelsea 

Marshall 

Nevada 

Boone. ., 

Missouri River 

Lyons 

Mapleton 

Sac City 

Kingsley 

Ames 

Callanan 

Wisconsin State line 

Milwaukee 

Fond du Lac 

Plymouth 

Glenbeulah 

Fond du Lac 

Princeton 

Platteville 

Conley 

Lancaster 

Montfort 

Conley 

Montfort 

Madison 

Genoa 

Lake Geneva 

St. Charles 

Quinnesec 

State Line 

Crystal Falls 

Stambaugh 



Florence .... 
Metropolitan. 



Galesville 

Afton 

Evansville 

Tipton 

Anamosa 

Kirkman 

Audubon 

Muchakinock 

Coal Mines 

Onawa 

Moville 

Rapids 

Coal Banks 

Toledo 

Webster City 

Eagle Grove 

Elmore 

Des M. & M. Junct . 

Willow Glen 

Hawarden 

Stratford 

Lake City . . 

Wall Lake Junction 

Sycamore 

Spring Valley 

Rochester 

Waseca 

Janesville. ........ 

St. Peter 

New Ulm 

Watertown 

Mankato 

Redwood Falls 

Zumbrota 

Plainview 

Chatfield 

Dakota Line 

Volga 

Pierre 

Ordway 

Columbia 

Redfield 



Miles 



41.00 
29.00 
29.00 
23.00 
149.60 

2.60 
60.15 
12.76 
58.11 
37.00 
20.34 
44.60 
40.40 
62.63 
13.90 

5.70 
23.40 
35.40 
31.50 

8.50 
31.38 
13.50 

8.00 
60.84 
80.04 
36.34 

8.70 

2.40 
24.71 

6.37 
16.69 
19.50 
36.13 
11.00 
34.86 

8.44 

6.71 

6.10 
15.68 

8.50 
70.97 
34.81 
17.00 
62.43 

1.57 
20.70 

9.00 

5.96 

3.25 

3.00 
80.39 
14.76 
66.41 

1.75 
29.81 
115.39 
15.03 
43.27 
15.38 

4.64 
75.78 
49.50 
55.50 
11.00 
23.00 
30.00 
153.98 

3.75 
24.40 
24.48 
15.01 
11.46 
46.40 
24.51 
184.60 
N7 95 

5.47 
71.00 



Built by 



Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad 



Maple River Railroad Company 

Des Moines & Minneapolis Railroad Company 

Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad Company 
Green Bay, Milwaukee & Chicago R. R. Co. 
North-Western Union Railway Company 
Sheboygan & Mississippi Railroad Company 

Sheboygan & Fond du Lac Railroad 

Galena & Southern Wisconsin Railroad Co. 

Chicago & Tomah Railroad Company 



Milwaukee & Madison Railway Company 
Fox River Valley Railroad Company 
State Line & Union Railroad Company 
St. Charles Railroad Company 
Menominee River Railroad Company 



Menominee Railway Company 

Escanaba & Lake Superior Railway Company 

Galesville & Mississippi River Railway Co. 
Rock River Railway Company 
Janesville & Evansville Railway Company 
Stanwood & Tipton Railway 
Iowa Midland Railway Company 
Iowa South-West Railway Company 

Ottawa, Cedar Falls & St. Paul Railway Co. 

Consolidation Coal Company 

Maple Valley Railway Company 

Sioux Valley Railway Company 

Linn County Railway Company 

Iowa Railway Coal & Manufacturing Co. 

Toledo & North-Western Railway 



Sycamore & Cortland Railroad Company 
Northern Illinois Railway Company 
Winona & St. Peter Railroad Company 



Winona, Mankato & New Ulm Railway Co. 

Minnesota Valley Railway Company 

Rochester & Northern Minnesota Railway Co. 

Plainview Railroad Company 

Chatfield Railroad Company 

Chicago & Dakota Railway Company 

Dakota Central Railway Company 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



97 



CONSTRUCTION— Continued 



When 
Built 



1883 
1883 
1885 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1900 
1900 
1887 
1888 
1888 

1SSS 

1888 
1889 
1891 
1872 
1873 
1871 
1872 
1874 
1876 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1874 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1892 
1882 
1888 
1889 
1882 
1883 
1888 
1889 
1887 
1887 
1889 
1891 
1892 



1897 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1867 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1901 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1879 



TERMINI 



From 



Castlewood Junct. . 

Iroquois 

Centerville 

Columbia 

Redfield 

Doland 

Faulkton 

Verdon 

Mankato 

Tyler 

Iron River 

Near Ishpeming. . . . 

dowry 

Wabic 

Lake Geneva 

Montrose 

Crystal Falls 

Lake Shore Junct.. . 

Sheboygan 

Manitowoc 

Brillion 

1 m. e. of Appleton 

Appleton 

New London 

Clint onville 

Tigerton 

Eland Junction 

Aniwa 

Summit Lake 

Three Lakes 

Michigan State line . 

Gogebic 

L. Montreal River. . 

Manitowoc 

Hortonville 

Lee • 

Eland Junction 

Wausau 

Monico 

Rhinelander 

Lake Flambeau. . . . 

Ant igo 

Bryant 

Pratt Junction 



Hurley 

Watersmeet. 



Branches to mines 
Spurs to mills off 
Northern Junction.. 

Wall Lake 

Boyer 

Kirkman 

Burt 

Sanborn 

Wabeno 

Blue Earth 

Mason City 

Blue Earth 

Stark 

Princeton 

Red Granite Junct. . 
Nekoosa Junction . . 

Pelican 

Nelson 

Evan 

Missouri Valley 

California Junction . 

Sloan 

California Junction . 

Moville 

Fremont 

Maple Creek 

West Point 

Wisner 



To 



Watertown 

Hawarden 

Yankton 

Oakes 

Faulkton 

Verdon 

Gettysburg 

Groton 

New Ulm 

Astoria 

Watersmeet 

Republic 

Michigamme 

Champion 

Williams Bay 

North Evanston 

Hemlock Mine. ... 

Sheboygan 

Manitowoc 

Brillion 

1 m. e. of Appleton 

Appleton 

New London 

Clintonville 

Tigerton 

Eland Junction 

Aniwa 

Summit Lake 

Three Lakes 

Michigan State Line 

Gogebic 

L. Montreal River 

Ashland 

Two Rivers 

Lee 

Oshkosh 

Wausau 

Marshrield 

Rhinelander 

Lake Flambeau. . 

Hurley 

Brvant 

East B. Switch... 
Westerly 



Southwesterly. 
Northerly 



off Ashland Division 
Ashland Division. . . 
Wabeno, Wisconsin 

Denison 

Mondamin 

Harlan 

Sanborn 

Vesta 

Laona 

Mason City 

Belle Plaine 

Fox Lake 

Buxton 

Marshfield 

Red Granite 

Nekoosa 

Crandon 

Peoria 

Marshall 

California Junction. 

Sloan 

Sioux City 

Fremont 

Sarg Bluffs 

Maple Creek 

West Point 

Wisner 

Oakdale 



Miles 



43 

125 
28 
38 
32 
24 
42 
1 1 
12.") 
32 
35 
21 
1(1 

1 

6 

7 
15 
48 
25 
21 
12(1 

1 
19 
1(1 
18 
12 
10 
26 
28 
31 
26 
40 
39 

6 
11 
11. 
23 
40 
15. 
26. 
45. 

5. 

2. 
13. 

9. 
16. 
10 

1. 
12. 

3. 
34, 
21. 
46. 
24. 
61 

6, 
91 
26, 
11 
59. 
106. 
29. 
21. 
85. 

7. 

6. 
17. 
82. 
45. 

5. 
49. 
20 
31. 
20 
10 
25. 
17. 
58 



Built by 



Dakota Central Railway Company 



Mankato & New Ulm Railway Company 
Minnesota & South Dakota Railroad Company 
Iron River Railway Company 
Iron Range Railway Company 



Lake Geneva & State Line Railway 
Junction Railway Company 
Paint River Railway Company 
Milwaukee, Manistee & Green Bay Company 
Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Ry. Co. 
Appleton & New London Railway Company 

Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Ry. Co. 



Wisconsin Northern Railway Company 
Boyer Valley Railway Company 

Harlan & Kirkman Railway Company 
Minnesota & Iowa Railway Company 

Chicago & North-Western Railway Company 
Iowa, Minnesota & North-Western Ry. Co. 



Southern Iowa Railway Company 
Princeton & North-Western Railway Co. 



Chicago & North-Western Railway Company 
Peoria & North-Western Railway Company 
Minnesota Western 
Sioux City & Pacific Railroad Company 



Moville Extension Railway Company 
Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley R.R.Co. 



98 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 







CONSTRUCTION— 


Continued 


When 


TERMINI 


Miles 


Built by 


Built 


From 


To 


1880 






5.33 

31.76 

10.30 

97.64 

49.72 

6.28 

136.75 

55.79 

48.11 

58.02 

52.11 

60.79 

53.12 

36.43 

27.76 

10.36 

120.26 

77.53 

46.61 

11.98 

14.12 

9.13 

21.19 

.39 

.12 

11.27 

2.40 

2.55 

1.62 

2.92 

69.40 

76.79 

28.97 

24.70 

26.40 

19.74 


Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley R.R.Co. 


1880 


Norfolk Junction. . . 




1881 




«> ■< ii 


1881 


Neligh 




•. ii si 


1882 






.• ii ii 


1883 






n i. ii 


1885 
1885 


Valentine 


Chadron 

Buffalo Gap 

Rapid City 

Wyoming State line 


.. ii .1 


1886 
1886 
1886 


Buffalo Gap 

Dakota Junction. . . 


;. .; ;; 


1886 






.. i. ii 


1887 




.1 .i ii 


1887 
1887 


Arlington 

J. near Irvington. . . 
Platte River Junct. 




.. i. .i 


1887 
1887 
1887 


Stock Yds.,S. Oma. 
D. & M. tr. Hastings 


" ;; " 


1888 




Kansas State line . . 


•I ii .i 


1888 




•i 


1890 
1890 


Buffalo Gap 


Hot Springs 


.. 


1890 
1891 


Whitewood 

Deadwood F. Depot 
Deadwood — Lee St. 
Deadwood — Pine St 
Portland Junction 
Branches to Mines o 
Branches to Mines o 


Stock Yds. Belle F. 


" " " 


1891 
1891 
1891 

1902 


Pine Street 

Ruby Basin 

End of track 

ff Ruby Basin 

ff Portland Branch. 


ii x ii 


1902 






■I 14 1, 


1886 

1887 


Wyoming State line. 


Glen Rock 


Wyoming Central Railway Company 


1888 


Glen Rock 

Eldora Junction. . . . 
Eland Junction 

Total consolida 


>> i. .1 


1903 
1903 


Alden, Iowa 

Rosholt, Wis 

ted 


Chicago A North- Western Railway Company 




7,290.55 





PROPRIETARY LINES 





TERMINI 


Miles 


Built by 


Built 


From 


To 


1884 






16.06 
3.25 


Princeton & Western Railway Company 






Seatonville 




Total proprieta 






19.31 











LEASED LINES 

St. Paul Eastern Grand Trunk Railway 





TERMINI 


Miles 


Built by 




Built 


From 


To 




1882 




Stiles Junction 

Oconto Falls 

Clintonville 


10.00 
5.00 

41.00 
4.02 


St. Paul Eastern Grand Trunk 


Railway Co. 


1883 
1884 


Stiles Junction 










Total 








60.02 













RECAPITULATION Miles 

Chicago & North- Western consolidated roads 7,290.55 

Proprietary lines 19.31 

Leased lines 60.02 

Grand total 7,373.52 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN* RAILWAY SYSTEM 



99 



CONSTRUCTION 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway 

This important railroad, the control of which by the Chicago ev: North- Western 
Company is referred to on other pages, was built under various corporate names, and 
these were finally consolidated under the title now in use. Owing to the changes in 
ownership, loss of records by fire, etc., it is not possible to give an exact history of 
the construction of the entire mileage, but the following is accurate as far as it goes. 



When 


TERMINI 




Built 


From 


To 




Miles 


1868 
1869 


WISCONSIN 

Black River Falls " 


DIVISION 

Black River Falls 


Wis. 


20. 4S 
33 71 


1870 




45 . 60 


1871 








03 Id 


1871 




3 30 


1871 
1872 


Stillwater Junction " 

Elroy " 


Warren 


Wis. 


32. 28 
11 70 


1878 


Toward Neillsville " 

Shaw's Mill 


4 50 


1880 




2 74 


1880 






3.01 


1880 






4 55 


1880 
1881 


4"r Miles East cf Merrillan " 


Neillsville " 

Cedar Falls " 

Marshfield " 

Osseo i (Pur- " 


9.50 
2 01 


1881 
1885 
1887 
1891 


Extension into Village of Neilsville. ... " 

Neillsville " 

Fairchilcl " 


13.12 
1.37 

23 . 30 
13.90 


1887 




1" SI) 


1889 


Mondovi ) in 1891). 


10 30 


1890 








1901 




Birch wood 

Spring Yallev 


Wis. 


12 50 


*1901 




20 65 


1902 




15.72 


1902 




Radisson " 

Still Lawn " 


23 50 


1902 
1903 




34.33 
15.00 


1904 




Winter " 


10 00 


1871 


North Wisconsin Junction " 


13.30 


1874 


Clavton " 


24.60 


1878 


Clayton " 


17.60 


1879 
1880 


Cable " 


20.00 
38 50 


1881 


Cable " 


4.00 


1881 
1881 


Bloomer " 


14 . 50 
9 00 


1882 


• 4 Miles North of Cable " 


North of Mason " 

South of Bear Creek " 


26 00 


1882 
1882 




37.00 
13.13 


1882 


9 Miles north of Superior Junction " 




51.57 


1883 


Bavfield 


28 24 


1883 




North of Bear Creek " 

Ashland 


10 57 


1883 




4 65 


1883 




4.3S 


1884 


Spur to City Depot, Chippewa Falls. . " 
Superior Short Line Junction " 




1.31 


1884 






1884 
1884 




Wis. 


6.30 
.58 


1884 




1.40 


1886 
1890 


St. Paul & Duluth Railroad Con 

IOWA DIVISION 


Wis. 


2.60 
89 


1864 

to 
1869 
1870 


MINNESOTA & 

-St. Paul Minn. 


98.52 
22.50 


1871 


West . . . 


58 00 


1872 
1877 

1878 
1878 


58 Miles West of St. James " 


Sioux Falls 


S Dak. 
Minn. 


64.74 
58 40 




44 20 


1879 




28 00 


1880 
1880 
1881 


Sioux Falls S. Dak. 




S Dak. 
. . , Minn. 


39.60 
43.48 



* Purchased in 1901. 



100 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



CONSTRUCTION— Continued 



When 
Built 



TERMINI 



From 



To 



Miles 



1884 
1887 
1899 
1899 
1900 

1871 
to 

1876 
1877 
1877 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1 880 
1881 

1890 
1891 
1893 



Woodstock Minn. 

Salem S. Dak. 

Fairmont Minn. 

Bingham Lake 

Jefferies 

1 NEBRASKA DIVISION 



Pipestone Minn. 

Mitchell S. Dak. 

Medelia Minn. 

Jefferies 

Currie " 



> Omaha Neb. 

Coburn Junction 

Coburn Junction 

Tekamah 

Oakland 

Missouri River Transfer 

Emerson Junction 

Wavne 

Wakefield 

Wayne 

Covington 

1 Mile North of Randolph 

Bloomfield 

Ponca 



Tekamah Neb. 

Covington " 

Ponca " 

Oakland " 

Coburn Junction " 



Wavne Neb. 

Norfolk 

Hartington 

1 Mile North of Randolph 

Junction with Sioux City Bridge Co.'s 

Tracks 

Bloomfield 

End of Track 

Newcastle 



10.90 
32.73 
29.38 
13.90 
24.73 

42.01 

7.74 
16.33 
15.76 
53.51 

2.25 
18.70 
27.80 
33 . 76 
21.68 

1.79 

21.08 

.38 

10.62 



Grand total, December 31, 1904 1,686.47 



MILEAGE OF THE SYSTEM, DECEMBER 31, 1904 

Chicago & North-Western Proper 

Miles 

Ashland Division 856.66 

Galena Division 496.81 

Iowa Division 569.46 

Minnesota & Iowa Division 326.75 

Madison Division 509.27 

Minnesota Division 499.88 

Dakota Division S02.53 

Northern Iowa Division 3S3.57 

Northern Wisconsin Division 332.72 

Peninsula Division 464.44 

Sioux City Division 416.15 

Wisconsin Division 324.55 

Nebraska & Wyoming Division 1,404.62 

Total Chicago & North-Western Railway proper 7,387.41 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway 

Miles- 
Eastern District, Wisconsin Division 354.43 

Northern District, Wisconsin Division 433.34 

Minnesota & Iowa Division 620.89 

Nebraska Division 277.81 

Total December 31, 1904 1,6S6.47 

Total of the System 

Miles 

Chicago & North-Western Railway 7.3S7.41 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway 1,686.47 



Total mileage North-Western System 9,073-SS 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 101 



GROSS EARNINGS FROM TRAFFIC 



The following table shows the gross earnings from traffic year by- 
year of the Chicago & North-Western proper: 



1S60 $ 384 

1861 720 

1862 849 

1863 1,083 

1864 1,975 

1S65 6,820 

1866 8,243 

1867 10,161 

1868 12,614 

1869 13,941 

1S70 12,535 

1871 11,694 

1872 11,402 

1S73 12,736 

1874 14,351 



,659 1875 $12,707,726 

,705 1876 12,773,000 

,719 1S77 11,877,000 

,054 1878 13,583,000 

,566 1S79 13,420,000 

,749 18S0 17,349,000 

,840 1881 19,334,000 

,735 1SS2 23,684,000 

,846 1883 24,081,000 

,343 1884 25,020,000 

,428 1885 23,502,000 

,914 1886 24,279,000 

161 1887 26,321,000 

,606 1888 26.697.000 

,523 1S89 25,692,000 



1S90 $27,164,000 

1891 27,793,000 

1892 31,422,000 

1S93 32,709,000 

1894 31,984,000 

1895 28,108,000 

1896 33,488,000 

1897 30,977,000 

1898 36,050,000 

1S99 38,016,000 

1900 42,950,000 

1901 43,098,000 

1902 46,644,000 

1903 49.822,000 

1904 53,334,633 



CHARTERS AND ORGANIZATION 



To show the legal structure and the corporate enactments that 
eventuated in the present system, we have borrowed, with thanks, the 
following from an exhaustive compilation made by J. B. Redfield, who 
has "always" been the company's auditor : 

CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY AND COMPONENTS 
Components of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad Company 
Madison & Beloit Railroad Company 
Wisconsin 
Organized July 3, 1849, under act of August 19, 1848. 
Amended February 4, 1850. 
Name changed to — 



Rock River Valley Union R. R. Co. 
By Act of February 9, 1850. 
Amended March li, 1851. 
(Line, Sharon, Wis., to Fond du Lac.) 
Consolidated with 111. & Wis. R. R. Co., 

March 31, 1855. 
Under Act of March 10, 1855. 



111. & Wis. R. R. Co., Illinois 
Organized December 30, 1851. 
Under Act of February 12, 1851. 
(Line, Chicago to Sharon, Wis.) 
Consolidated with R. R. V. U. R. R. Co., 

March 31, 1855. 
Under powers of its charter. 



The consolidation of the R. R. V. U. R. R. Co. with the 111. & Wis. R. R. Co. formed the 

Chicago, St. Paul &• Fond du Lac Railroad Company, March 31, 1S55 
Covering line, Chicago to Fond du Lac 
Added by consolidations, as follows: 



Ontonagon & St. Line R. R. Co. 

Michigan. 
Organized June 21, 1856. 
General Law of February 12, 

1855. 
Consolidated with C.,St. P. & 

Fond du Lac, March 27, 1857. 



Marquette & St. Line R. R. Co. 

Michigan. 
Organized January 14, 1857. 
General Law of February 12, 

1855. 
Consolidated with C, St. P. & 

Fond du Lac, March 21, 1857. 



Wisconsin & Superior R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Organized October 24, 1856. 
Acts of October 11 and 13, 1856. 
Consolidated with C, St. P. & 
Fond du Lac, March 5, 1857. 
Acts of Feb. 12 and 28, 1857. 



RECAPITULATION 

Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac, fornied March 31, 1855. 
Wisconsin & Superior, added by consolidation, March 5, 1857. 
Marquette & State Line, added by consolidation, March 21, 1S57. 
Ontonagon & State Line, added by consolidation, March 27, 1857. 



Note. — The consolidated company (embracing all the above described lines') retained the name 
of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad Company until its property and franchises were 
sold under foreclosure, June 2, 1859. 



102 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Components of the Dixon, Rockford & Kenosha Ry. Co. 



Rockford Central R. R. Co. 
Illinois. 

Incorporated February 15, 1855. 

Its subscription lists, franchises, etc., 
transferred November 26, 1856, to the 
Kenosha & Rockford R. R. Co. 

Organized October 14, 1856. 

General Law of November 5, 1849. 

Its subscription lists, franchises, etc., 
transferred February 6, 1857, to the 

Kenosha & Rockford R. R. Co. 

Illinois. 
Incorporated January 20, 1857. 
Consolidated with K. & R. of Wisconsin, 
March 5, 1857. 



Kenosha & Beloit R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Incorporated March 4, 1853. 
Amended March 10, 1853 
" February 2, 1854. 
March 13 1855. 
March 20, 1856. 
February 14, 1857, 
By which last amendment its name was 
changed to 



Kenosha & Rockford R. R. Co. 
Wisconsin. 
Consolidated with K. & R. of Illinois 
March 5, 1857. 

THE CONSOLIDATION OF THE 
K. & R. of Illinois with the K. & R. of Wisconsin 



Rockford & Miss. 
Illinois. 



R. R. Co. 



Incorporated Januarv 28, 1857. 
Consolidated with K., R. & R. I. R. 
Co. June 19, 1S57. 



R. 



Formed the 
Kenosha, Rockford & Rock Island 
R. R. Co. 
March 5, 1857. 
Under Act of March 2, 1857. 
Consolidated with the Rockford & Mis 
sissippi R. R. Co. June 19, 1857. 

THE CONSOLIDATION OF THE 

Rockford & Mississippi with the K., R. & R. I. R. R. Co., June 19, 1857. 

Retained the name of the 

Kenosha, Rockford & Rock Island R. R Co. 

until January 7, 1864, when, having made default in respect to the trust deeds of its 

components, it was sold, and the purchasers 

Dixon, Rockford & State Line R. R 

Illinois. 
Organized January 6, 1864 



Formed the 
Kenosha & State Line R. R. Co. 



Organized January 15, 1864, and con- 
solidated with the Dixon, Rockford & 
State Line R. R. Co. January 16, 1864. 



Co. 



General Law of November 5, 1849. 
Consolidated with K. & St. Line R. 
Co. January 16, 1864. 



R. 



THE CONSOLIDATION OF THE 

Dixon, Rockford & State Line with the Kenosha & State Line 

formed the 

Dixon, Rockford & Kenosha Railway Co., January 16, 1864. 

Consolidated with the Chicago & North-Western Ry. Co., January 19, 1864. 

COMPONENTS OF THE GALENA & CHICAGO UNION R. R. CO. 

Galena & Chicago Union R. R. Co., Illinois 

Incorporated January 16, 1836. 

Amended March 4, 1837, 

February 24, 1847, 

and February 25, 1S54. 

Added by consolidation, etc., as follows: 



St. Charles Branch R. R. Co. 

Illinois. 
Incorporated January 31, 1849. 
Name changed to 

Chicago, St. Charles & Miss. Air 
Line R. R. Co. 
Jan. 3, 1853, and passed into possession 
of the G. & C. U. Co., by " Articles of 
Union." executed April 10, 1854. 



Miss. & Rock River Junction R. R. Co. 

Illinois. 

Incorporated February 15, 1851. 
Amended February 28, 1854. 
Consolidated with G. & C. U. R. R. Co. 

January 9, 1855. 
Confirmed bv Act of February 15, 1855. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 103 



RECAPITULATION. 

Galena & Chicago Union, incorporated January 16, 1836. 

Chicago, St. Charles & M. A. L., added by articles of union, April 10, 1854. 

Mississippi & R. R. Junction, added by consolidation, January 9, 1855. 

The consolidated corporation formed as above retained the name of the Galena 
& Chicago Union R. R. Co. until consolidated with the Chicago & North-Western 
Railway Company, June 2, 1864. 



Peninsula R. R. Co. 

Michigan. 

Organized February 3, 1862, under Gen- 
eral Law of February 12, 1855. 

Consolidated with C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. 
October 21, 1864. 

Baraboo Air Line R. R. Co. 
Wisconsin. 
Incorporated March 8, 1870. 
Amended February 2, 1871. 
Consolidated with C. & N.-W. March 

10, 1871. 
Act of February 17, 1871. 



Beloit & Madison R. R. Co. 
Wisconsin. 

Incorporated February 18, 1852. 

Organized July 1, 1852. 

Sold and reorganized (under same name) 

September 18, 1862. 
Consolidated with C. & N.-W. Ry. 

January 10, 1871. 

La Crosse, Tremp. & Prescott R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Chartered March 6, 1857. 
Amended April 4, 1864. 
Consolidated with C. & N.-W. June 6, 
1877. 



Components of Menominee River Railroad Company. 



Menominee River R. R. Co. 

Michigan. 
Organized February 9, 1875, under 
General Laws of Michigan. 



Menominee Railway Co. 
Wisconsin. 
Organized November 20, 1879, under 
General Laws of Wisconsin. 



The two (2) corporations last above were consolidated October 15, 1880, under the 
name of "Menominee River R. R. Co." 

Consolidated with Chicago & North-Western Railway Company July 1, 1882. 

Escanaba & Lake Superior Railway Company 

Michigan. 

Organized November 24, 1SS0, under General Law. 

Consolidated with Chicago & North-Western Railway Company July 1, 1882. 



Galesville & Miss. River R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Organized April 4, 1882. 

Sold to 
C. & N.-W. Railwav Co., March 16,1883. 



Rock River Railway Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Organized March 18, 1880. 

Sold to 
C. & N.-W. Railway Co. March 16, 1883. 



Components of Elgin & State Line R. R. Co. 



Fox River Valley R. R. Co. 
Illinois. 
Chartered by Act of June 18, 1852. 
Name changed to 



Elgin & State Line R. R. Co. 

Illinois. 
By Act of February 12, 1859. 



State Line & Union R. R. Co. 
Wisconsin. 
Chartered by Act of March 2, 1871. 
Consolidated with Elgin & State Line, 
October 8, 1880, under name of 
"Elgin & State Line R. R. Co." 



St. 



Charles R. R. Co. 
Illinois. 
Chartered by Act of February 18, 1859, 

amended March 27 ; 1869. 
Consolidated with Elgin & State Line. 
Januarv 8, 1881, under name of 
" Elgin & State Line R. R. Co." 
The Elgin & State Line R. R. Co. (formed as above) consolidated with Chicago & 
North-Western Railway Company June 7, 1883. 



104 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Components of Chicago, Milwaukee & North-Western Ry. Co. 



Illinois Parallel R. R. Co. 

Illinois. 

Chartered by Act of February 17, 1851. 

Amended by Act of February 5, 1853. 

Changing the name to 

Chicago & Milwaukee R. R. Co. 

Amended by Act of February 11, 1857. 

The Chicago & Milwaukee R. R. Co. 
and the Milwaukee & Chicago R. R. 
Co. were consolidated June 5, 1863, 
under the name of 
"Chicago & Milwaukee Railway Co." 

Leased to C. & N.-W. May 2, 1866, and 
was consolidated with the North- 
western Union Railway Co. January 
8, 1881, retaining the name of 

"Chicago & Milwaukee Railway Co." 

Galena & Southern Wis. R. R. Co. 

Chartered (in 111.) January 26, 1853. 

Amended " February 10, 1853. 

Chartered (in Wis.)March 2, 1857. 

Sold under foreclosure May 3, 1879. 

The purchasers organized two corpora- 
tions (one in 111., May 5, 1879, and 
one in Wis., May 8, 1879), which were 
consolidated August 5, 1879, under 
name of 
"Galena and Wisconsin R. R. Co." 

Consolidated with Chicago & Tomah 
R. R. August 31, 1880. 

Sheboygan & Miss. R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 

Chartered by Act of March 8, 1852. 

Amended June 6, 1853. 

Amended March 12, 1855. 

Sold March 2, 1861, when the purchasers 
formed a new company named She- 
boygan & Fond du Lac R. R. Co. 

Sold April 3, 1880, when the purchasers 
formed a new company called 

"Sheboygan & Western Railway Co." 



Green Bay, Mil. & Chicago R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Chartered by Act of March 13, 1851. 
Amended " " March 4, 1852. 

March 4. 1853. 

July 6, 1853. 

January 31 1854. 

March 6, 1857, 
Changing name to 

Milwaukee & Chicago R. R. Co. 



Milwaukee & North-Western Ry. Co. 

Wisconsin. 

Chartered by Act of February 25, 1871. 

Name changed by resolution of direct- 
ors, May 3, 1872, to 
"Northwestern Union Railway Co." 

Consolidated with Chicago & Milwaukee 
Ry. Co. January 8, 1881. 



Chicago & Tomah R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Organized September 27, 1872, under 

General Law of Wisconsin 
Consolidated with the Galena & Wis. 
Aug. 31, 1880, retaining the name of 
"Chicago & Tomah R. R. Co." 
Consolidated with Milwaukee & Madi- 
son Ry. Co. November 30, 1880. 



Milwaukee & Madison Ry. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Organized May 15, 1880, under General 

Law of Wis. 
Consolidated with the Chicago & Tomah 
Nov. 30, 1880, retaining the name of 
"Milwaukee & Madison Rv. Co." 



The three (3) corporations (resulting from consolidations noted above), viz, 

Chicago & Milwaukee Ry. Co., 
Sheboygan & Western Ry. Co., 
Milwaukee & Madison Ry. Co., 



were consolidated together March 19, 
under the name of 



1881, 



"CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY CO." 
Consolidated with Chicago & North-Western Railway Company June 7, 1SS3. 



Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska R. R. 

Iowa. 

Organized January 26, 1856, under 

Gen'l Law. 
Leased to G. & C. U. July 3, 1862. 
Modified lease (to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co.) 

executed December 10, 1869. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. July 1, 
1884. 



Sac City & Wall Lake R. R. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized under Gen'l Law August 11, 

1877. 
Sold to Maple River R. R. Co. June 17, 
1879. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 105 



Maple River R. R. Co. 

Iowa. 
Organized June 10, 1876, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Leased to C. & N -W. November 23, 1876. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. July 3, 

1884. 



Stanwood & Tipton Ry. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized July 31, 1872, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. October 
24, 1SS4. 

Iowa South-Western Ry. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized June 18, 1S80, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. October 
24, 1884. 

Maple Valley Ry. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized April 9, 1886, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. May 4, 1887. 

Janesville & Evansville Ry. Co. 

Wisconsin. 

Organized April 15, 1886, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. Mav 6, 
1887. 

Sioux Valley Ry. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized January 13, 1887, under 

Gen'l Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. No- 
vember 2, 1887. 

Sycamore & Courtland R. R. Co. 
Illinois. 
Organized June 29, 1858. 
Charter granted February 19, 1859. 

Laws of 1859, page 514. 
Sold to C & N.-W. Ry. Co. June 7, 1888. 

Iron River Ry. Co. 

Michigan. 
Organized under Gen'l Law Oct. 8, 1886. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. June 10, 
1889. 



Lake Geneva & State Line Ry. Co. 

Wisconsin. 

Organized under Gen'l Law August S, 

1887. 
Sold to C. & N-W. Ry. Co. June 10, 

1SS9. 

Junction Railway Co. 

Illinois. 
Organized under Gen'l Law Januarv 15, 

1889. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. June 4, 1891. 

Northern Illinois Ry. Co. 

Illinois. 
Organized under Gen'l Law Februarv 

15, 1884. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. June 7, 

1888. 



Iron Range Ry. Co. 

Michigan. 
Organized under Gen'l Law August 13, 

1887. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Rv. Co. June 10, 

1889. 

C. Rapids & Mo. R. R. R. 

Iowa. 
Organized June 14, 1859, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Leased to G. & C. U. July 8, 1862. 
Modified lease (to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co.) 

executed December 1, 1865. 
(Branch from California Jet. to Mo. 

Valley conveved to S. C. & P. R. R. 

Co. July 31 1871.) 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry Co. July 2, 1884. 

Iowa & Minnesota Ry. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized February 8, 1866, under Gen'l 
Law of Iowa. 

Des Moines & Minnesota R. R. Co. 

Organized August 1, 1870, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Purchased the right of way, etc., of the 

Iowa & Minnesota Ry. Co., and by 

Amended Articles of date July 5, 1877, 

changed the name to 

Des Moines & Minneapolis R. R. Co. 
Iowa. 
Leased to C. & N.-W. July 25, 1879. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry.jCo. October 24, 
1884. 



106 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Iowa Midland Ry. Co. 

Iowa 

Organized March 2, 1870, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Acquired the rights of Iowa Central Air 
Line R. R. Co., and of its successor, 
Miss., Maquoketa & N.-W. R. R. Co. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. October 
24, 1884. 



Ottumwa, Cedar Falls & St. Paul 

Railway Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized July 2. 1SS3. 

Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. October 

24, 18S4. 

Iowa Ry. Coal & Mfg. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized August 18, 1873, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. Novem- 
ber 2, 1887. 

Linn County Ry. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized October 30, 1886, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Railway Co. Novem- 
ber 2, 1887. 

Wisconsin Northern Ry. Co. 
Wisconsin. 
< )rganized under General Law February 

11, 1896. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. September 
10, 1897. 

Boone County Ry. Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized January 16, 1899. 
Leased to C. & N.-W. March 30, 1900. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. June 8, 1900. 



Harlan & Kirkman Ry. Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized May 8, 1899. 
Leased to C. & N.-W. Dec. 15, 1899. 
Sold to C. & N -W. June 8, 1900. 



Iowa, Minnesota & N.-W. Ry. Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized Julv 22, 1898. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. June 8, 1900. 



Boyer Valley Railway Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized October 3, 1898. 
Leased to C. & N.-W. Dec. 15, 1899. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. June 8, 1900. 



Minnesota & Iowa Ry. Co. 

Minnesota. 
Organized November 11, 1898. 
Sold to C. & N.-W June 8, 1900. 



Toledo & North-Western Ry. 

Iowa. 

Organized June 15, 1869, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. June 6, 1890. 



Paint River Railway Co. 

Michigan. 

Organized under Gen'l Law Mav 28, 

1890. 
Sold to C & N.-W. Ry. Co. June 4, 1891. 



Components of Milwaukee, Lake S 
Appleton & New London Ry. Co. 

Wisconsin. 

Line, Appleton to New London. 

Chartered April 9, 1866. 

Part of it sold June 1, 1872, to M., L. S. 

& W. Railroad Co. 
Remainder sold December 10, 1875, 

under foreclosure. 



Vieux Desert & L. S. R. R. Co. 

Michigan. 
Organized September 28, 1881. 
Consolidated with the M., L. S. & W. Ry. 
Co. February 13, 1883. 



hore & Western Railway Company 

Milwaukee, Manitowoc & Green Bay 

R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 

Line, Milwaukee to Manitowoc and 

Green Bav. 
Chartered March 10, 1870. 
Name changed, May 31, 1872, to "Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore & Western Rail- 
road Co." 
Sold Dec. 10, 1875, under foreclosure. 

Wolf & Wis. River R. R. Co. 

Wisconsin. 

Organized August 29, 1885. under Gen- 
eral Law. 

Sold to M., L. S. & W. Co., and con- 
veyed by deed January 15, 1889. 

(Stock purchased of J. W. Pratt, 
875,000.) 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 107 



Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway Company 
Wisconsin and Michigan. 
Organized under General Law of Wis., December 11, 1875, by the purchasers of the 
property and franchises of the Mil., L. S. & Western Railroad Co. and of the Apple- 
ton & New London Railway Co. at foreclosure sale, December 10, 1875 
Lines afterwards acquired (as above), viz.: 

Vieux Desert & L. S. Rv. by consolidation, Februarv 13, 1883. 
Wolf & Wis. River R. R.'by purchase, January 15, 1889. 
Sold to Chicago & North-Western Railway Company August 19, 1893 

Components of the Winona & St. Peter R. R. Co. 



The Transit R. R. Co. 
Minnesota. 
Chartered by Act of March 3, 1855. 
Sold June 23, 1860. 
Purchased by State of Minnesota. 
Reorganized as Winona & St. Peter R. 

R. Co. 
Chartered by Act of March 10, 1862. 

Minnesota Valley Ry. Co. 

Minnesota. 

Organized July 7, 1876,under Gen'l Law. 

Purchased by'W. & St. Peter R. R. Co., 

May 11, 1881, under authority of Act 

of February 19, 1881. 

Plainview R. R. Co. 

Minnesota. 
Organized December 11, 1877, under 

Gen'l Law. 
Purchased by Winona & St. Peter R. R. 

Co., May 11, 1881, under authority of 

Act of March 3, 1881. 

Chicago & Dakota Ry. Co. 

Organized May 6, 1879, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Purchased by W. & St. Peter R. R. Co., 

May 11, 1881, under authority of Act 

of February 19, 1881. 

Dakota Central Ry. Co. 

Dak. Ter. 

Organized May 7, 1879, Act of February 

18, 1879. 
Sold to W. & St. P. February 12, 1900. 



Winona, Mankato & New Ulm Ry. Co. 

Minnesota. 
Organized June 25, 1870, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Purchased by W. & St. Peter R. R. Co , 

October 11, 1880, under authority of 

Act of March 6, 1871. 

Rochester & Northern Minn. Ry. Co. 

Minnesota. 
Organized October 25, 1877, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Purchased by W. & St. Peter R. R. Co., 

May 11, 1881, under authority of Act 

of February 19, 1881. 

Chatfield R. R. Co. 

Minnesota. 

Organized April 27, 1878, under Gen'l 

Law. 
Purchased by W. & St. Peter R. R. Co., 
May 11, 1881, under authority of Act 
of February 19, 1881. 

Mankato & New Ulm Ry. Co. 
Minnesota. 
Organized Januarv 13, 1899. 
Sold to W. & St. P., February 12, 1900. 

Minnesota & South Dakota Ry. Co. 

Minnesota. 
Organized August 3, 1S99. 
Sold to W. & St. P. February 12, 1900. 



The W. & St P. R. R., including lines acquired, sold to C. & N.-W. June 7, 1900. 



Southern Iowa Ry. Co. 


Peoria & North-Western Ry. Co. 


Iowa. 
Organized March 27, 1900. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. June 8, 1901. 


Illinois 
Organized November 7. 1900. 
Sold to C. & N.-W. June 8, 1901. 


Princeton & North-Western Ry. Co. 


Minnesota Western Ry. Co. 


Wisconsin. 


Minnesota. 


Organized June 12, 1900. 

Sold to C. & N.-W. June 8, 1901. 


Organized July 9, 1901. 

Sold to C. & N.-W. July 16, 1902. 



108 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Components of the Sioux 
Northern Nebraska Air Line R. R. Co. 

Nebraska. 
Organized June 7, 1867. 
Consolidated with the Sioux City & 
Pacific R. R. Co. September 15, 1868. 



Moville Extension Ry. Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized June 11, 1901. 
Sold to Sioux City & Pacific July 10, 
1901. 

Sold entire line to Chicago & North-Western Railway Co. August 28, 1901. 
Components of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Mo. Valley R. R. Co. 



City & Pacific R. R. Co. 

Sioux City & Pacific R. R. Co. 

Iowa. 

Organized August 1, 1864. 

Acquired Northern Nebraska Air Line 
by consolidation September 15, 1868 

Acquired branch from Mo. Valley to 
California Junction (5.84 miles) by 
purchase from the C, R. & Mo. River 
R. R. Co., July 31, 1871. 

Acquired the Moville Extension by pur- 
chase July 10, 1901. 



Fremont, Elkhorn & Mo. V. R. R. Co. 

Nebraska. 

Organized January 20, 1869. 

Right of way through Fort Robinson 
Reservation by Act of Congress, Janu- 
ary 20, 1885; through Ft. Mead 
Reservation by Act of Congress 
February 28, 1887. 

Acquired the Wyoming Central Ry. 
by consolidation June 4, 1891. 

Acquired the Eastern Wyoming by pur- 
chase June 4, 1891. 

Acquired the South Dakota Western 
by purchase June 4, 1891. 



Wyoming Central Ry. Co. 
Wyoming. 
Organized October 19, 1885. 
Leased to F., E. & M. V. Co. August 31, 

1886. 
Consolidated with F.,E. & M. V. R. R. 
Co. June 4, 1891. 

Eastern Wyoming Ry. Co. 
Organized August 11, 1890. 
Sold to F., E. & M. V. June 4, 1891. 

South Dakota Western Ry. Co. 
South Dakota. 
Organized February 20, 1890. 
Sold to F., E. & M. V. June 4, 1891. 

Entire lines of F., E. & M. V. R. R. Co. sold to C. & N.-W. February 28, 1903. 

THE ORIGINAL CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

The property and the franchises of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad 
Company were (after publication) sold at public auction in the city of Janesville, Wis- 
consin. June 2, 1859, by trustees, in pursuance of the powers of sale contained in certain 
trust deeds as follows : 

Trust deed, dated August 1, 1855, given by the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac 
Railroad Company to James Winslow, trustee, to secure first mortgage bonds. Trust 
deed, dated April 6, 1857, by same company to William A. Booth, James F. D Lanier, 
and William B Ogden, to secure second mortgage bonds. 

The purchasers at each sale were Samuel J. Tilden and Ossian D. Ashley, who 
acquired title to the property by deeds, as follows: 

James Winslow trustee, ) 

-Trustee's deed, June 2, 1859. 
Ashley. ) 

Lanier ) 
I' 



to 
Samuel J. Tilden and Ossian D 
William A. Booth and James F. D 
to 
Tilden & Ashley. ) 

William B. Ogden ) 

to 
Tilden & Ashley. J 

Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad] 
Company ! 

to f Quitclai 

Tilden & Ashley. J 



Trustee's deed, June 2, 1S59. 



Quitclaim (he having resigned), June 2, 
1859. 



im, June 30, 1859. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 109 

The purchasers of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad, organized June 
7, 1S59, under Act of Illinois, February 19, 1859, and under Act of Wisconsin, March 14, 
1859, and certificate made June 6, 1859, under the name of 

Chicago & North-Western Railway Company. 

The purchasers of the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad conveyed the 
property they acquired to the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company by deed 
dated July 1, 1859. 

Components of the Chicago & North-Western Railway Company 
Chicago & North-Western Railway Company, organized June 7, 1859. 



Dixon R. & K. Ry added bv consolidation, 

O. &C. U. R.R.." 

Peninsula R. R " 

Beloit & Madison " " 

Baraboo Air Line " 

La C, T. & Prescott 

Menominee River R. R " 

Escanaba & L. S. Ry 

Galesville & Miss. River R. R " purchase, 

Rock River R.R 

Elgin & State Line R.R " consolidation, 

Chicago, Mil. & X.-W. Ry 

Chicago, I. & Neb. R. R purchase, 

Cedar Rapids & Mo. River R. R " " 

Maple River R. R 

Stanwood & Tipton Ry " " 

Iowa Midland Rv 

Ottumwa, C. Falls & St. P. Ry 

Iowa South-Western Ry " " 

Des Moines & Minneapolis R. R " " 

Maple Valley Ry 

Janesville & Evansville Ry " " 

Sioux Valley Rv 

Iowa Ry. Coal & Mfg. Co 

Linn County Ry " " 

Sycamore & Cortland R. R " " 

Northern Illinois Ry " " 

Iron River Ry " " 

Iron Range Ry 

Lake Geneva & State Line Ry " " 

Toledo & North-Western Ry " 

Junction Railway " " 

Paint River Ry 

M., L. S.&W. Ry 

Wisconsin Northern Ry " " 

Winona & St. Peter R.R 

Minnesota & Iowa Ry " " 

Boyer Valley Ry " 

Harlan & Kirkman Ry " " 

Iowa, Minnesota & N.-W. Ry " " 

Boone County Ry " " 

Southern Iowa Ry " " 

Princeton & North- Western Ry " " 

Peoria & North- Western Ry " " 

Sioux City & Pacific R. R 

Minnesota Western Ry " " 

Fremont, Elkhorn & Mo Valley R R 

8 



January 19, 1864 
June 2," 1864 
October 21, 1864 
January 10, 1871 
March 10, 1871 
June 6, 1877 
July 1, 1882 
July 1, 1882 
March 16, 1883 
March 16, 1883 
June 7, 1883 
June 7, 1883 
July 1, 1884 
July 2, 18S4 
July 3, 1884 
October 24, 1884 
October 24, 1884 
October 24, 1884 
October 24, 1884 
October 24, 1884 
Mav 4. 1887 
Mav 6, 1887 
November 2, 1S87 
November 2, 1887 
November 2, 1887 
June 7, 1888 
June 7, 1888 
June 10, 1889 
June 10, 1889 
June 10, 1889 
June 6, 1890 
June 4, 1891 
June 4, 1891 
August 19, 1893 
September 10, 1S97 
June 7, 1900 
June 8, 1900 
June 8, 1900 
June 8, 1900 
June S, 1900 
June S, 1900 
June 8, 1901 
June 8, 1901 
June 8, 1901 
August 28. 1901 
Julv 16, 1902 
Februarv 28, 1903 



110 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



PROPRIETARY COMPANIES 
Princeton & Western Ry. Co. 
Wisconsin. 
Organized August 1, 1883. 



Florence County Ry. Co. 

Wisconsin. 
Organized August 26, 1898. 



Chicago Northern Ry. Co. 
Organized August 23, 1902. 

Forest City & Northern Ry. Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized May 20, 1881. 
Name changed April 28, 1882, to 

Chicago, Iowa & Dakota Ry. Co. 

DePue, Ladd & Eastern Ry. Co. 

Illinois. 
Organized July 16, 1888. 



Oshkosh City Ry. Co. 
Chartered by Wis. Act of April 16, 1866. 
Leased to Oshkosh Transportation Co. 



St. Paul, Eastern Grand Trunk Ry. Co. 

Wisconsin. 



Organized September 3, 1879. 

Leased Oct. 30, 1884 (for 99 years) to 

Mil., Lake Shore & Western Ry. Co 
The leasehold acquired by C. & X.-W 

Co. in purchase of the M., L. S. & W 

Ry., August 19, 1893. 

Macoupin County Ry. Co. 
Organized June 17, 1903. 

Western Town Lot Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized December 21, 1880. 
Acquired rights in other States. 

Pioneer Town Site Co. 

Nebraska. 
Organized August 16, 1887. 
Acquired rights in other States. 

Consolidation Coal Co. 
Iowa. 
Organized January 12, 1875. 

Superior Coal Co. 
Illinois. 
Organized January 17, 1903. 



THE UNDERLYING CHARTERS 



Madison <fe Beloit Railroad Company Wisconsin 

Amended 



Rock River Valley Union. 



. Amended . 



Illinois & Wisconsin Illinois. . . 

Amended 

Chicago, St. Paul it Fond du Lac Wisconsin 

Amended 



. .August 19 
. February 4 
. February 9 
. February 9 
. . .March 11 

April 1 

February 12 
February 17 
February 14 
. . .March 31 
. . . .March 

March 9 

October 11 

October 13 

October 13 

Rockford Central Illinois February 15 

Kenosha & Rockford Railroad (of Illinois) " January 20 

Rockford & Mississippi " January 28 

Kenosha & Beloit Wisconsin March 4 

Amended March 10 

" " February 2 

" " " March 13 

" " " March 20 

Kenosha & Rockford (of Wisconsin) February 14 

Kenosha, Rockford it Rock Island " March 2 

Mississippi <fc Rock Riyer Junction Illinois February 15 



Wisconsin & Superior. 



Supplemental 



Amended. 



St. Charles Branch Railroad 

Chicago, St. Charles it Mississippi Air Line Railroad 
Galena & Chicago Union 



.Amended. 



June 21 
. February 8 
. February' 28 
. January 31 
. . .January 3 
January 10 
. . . .March 4 
February 24 
. February 1 1 
February 25 



1848 
1850 
1850 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1851 
1851 
1853 
1856 
1857 
1857 
1856 
1856 
1856 
1855 
1857 
1857 
1853 
1853 
1S54 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1857 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1849 
1853 
1836 
1837 
1847 
1853 
1854 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 111 



Galena & Chicago Union Amended Illinois February 15 

Albany Bridge Company " February 14 

Beloit & Madison Wisconsin February 18 

Baraboo Air Line March 8 

Amended ..... .January 31 

La Crosse, Trempealeau & Prescott " March 6 

Amended " April 4 

Fox River Valley Illinois June 18 

Elgin & State Line " February 12 

State Line & Union Wisconsin March 2 

St. Charles Railroad Illinois February 18 

Amended " March 27 

Illinois Parallel Railroad Company " February 17 

Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad Company (new name 

for Illinois Parallel Railroad Company) February 5 

Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad Company Amended February 1 1 

Green Bay, Milwaukee & Chicago Wisconsin March 13 

" Amended March 4 

" " March 4 

July 6 

" January 31 

" " " March G 

Milwaukee & North-Western Railway Company " February 25 

Galena & Southern Wisconsin Railroad Company Illinois lanuary 26 

. .Amended " February 10 

" Wisconsin March 2 

Sheboygan & Mississippi " March 8 

Amended June 6 

" " " " March 12 

Transit Railroad Company Minnesota March 3 

Amended May 22 

" " " " March 8 

Winona & St. Peter " March 10 

Oshkosh City Railway Wisconsin April 1G 



1855 
1857 
1852 
1870 
1871 
1857 
1864 
1852 
1859 
1871 
1859 
1869 
1851 

1853 
1857 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1853 
1854 
1857 
1871 
1853 
1853 
1857 
1852 
1853 
1855 
1855 
1857 
1861 
1862 
1866 



A MAP OF THE SYSTEM 

We attach a very correct map of the system. On it you can trace 
the course of all of the lines of road we have described in these pages. 
If you will compare the length of the line from Chicago to Freeport, 
111., with that of all of the rest of the lines shown on this map, you 
will be enabled to appreciate the great growth the road has made 
between 1853 and the present day. 



CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY PROPER 



*ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STATIONS 



Aberdeen S. Dak. 

Abie Neb. 

Ablemans Wis. 

Afton " 

Ainsworth Neb. 

Ajax 

Akron 111. 

Albion Neb. 

Alcester S. Dak. 

Alden 111. 

Alden Iowa 

Alder Wis. 

Alecto Mich. 

Algona Iowa 

Algonquin 111. 

Allenville Wis. 

Allis " 

Almond " 

Almont Iowa 

Almora 111. 

Altamont Minn. 

Alton Iowa 

Amasa Mich. 

Amber Iowa 

Ames " 

Amiret Minn. 

Anamosa Iowa 

Anderson Mich. 

Anderson Minn. 

Anderson's Mills Wis. 

Andover Iowa 

Andrews Neb. 

Aniwa Wis. 

Ankeney Iowa 

Anoka Neb. 

Antigo Wis. 

Antoine Mich. 

Appleby S. Dak. 

Appleton Wis. 

Appleton Junction " 

Appleton Mine Mich. 

Arabia Neb. 

Arbor " 

Arcadia Jowa 

Arco Minn. 

Aredale Iowa 

Argyle 111. 

Arion Iowa 

Arlington S. Dak. 

Arlington Neb. 

Arlington Heights 111. 

Armstrong Mich. 

Arpin Wis. 

Arthur Iowa 

Ashland Wis. 

Ashton 111. 

Astoria S. Dak. 

Athol " 

Atkinson Mich. 

Atkinson Neb. 

Atwood Iowa 

Auburn " 

Audubon " 

Aurora S. Dak. 

Aurora 111. 

Austin " 

Bagley Mich. 

Balaton Minn. 

Baldwin Iowa 



Ballous Mich. 

Balsam " 

Bancroft Iowa 

Bancroft Wis. 

Bangor " 

Baraboo " 

Barclay Mich. 

Bark River " 

Barneveld Wis. 

Barrington 111. 

Bartel Wis. 

Barton " 

Bassett " 

Bassetts Neb. 

Basswood Mich. 

Batavia 111. 

Battle Creek Iowa 

Battle Creek Neb. 

Bay View Wis. 

Beach 111. 

Beaman Iowa 

Bear Creek Wis. 

Bear Trap " 

Beaver Iowa 

Beaver Mich. 

Beaver Crossing Neb. 

Bee " 

Beechwood Mich. 

Beemer Neb. 

Belgium Wis. 

Belle Fourche S. Dak. 

Belle Plaine Iowa 

Belle Plaine Wis. 

Beloit " 

Belvidere 111. 

Bennington Neb. 

Benton Wis. 

Beresford S. Dak. 

Berne Iowa 

Berry ville Wis. 

Bertram Iowa 

Bessemer Mich. 

Beverley Iowa 

Big Muddy Wyo. 

Big Suamico Wis. 

Birch " 

Birch Creek " 

Birnamwood " 

Black Hawk S. Dak. 

Black Tail " 

Blair Neb. 

Blairstown Iowa 

Blemers Mich. 

Blencoe Iowa 

Blodgett 111. 

Blue Earth Minn. 

Blue Mounds Wis. 

Blunt S. Dak. 

Bolton Wis. 

Bonesteel S. Dak. 

Boone Iowa 

Bordeaux Neb. 

Botna Iowa 

Bowen Neb. 

Boyer Iowa 

Bradgate " 

Bradish Neb. 

Brainard " 

Bramhall S. Dak. 

Brampton Mich. 



Branch Wis. 

Breed " 

Breda Iowa 

Brennan S. Dak. 

Bricelyn Minn. 

Brillion Wis. 

Bristol " 

Bristow Neb. 

Broadland S. Dak. 

Broadmoor Iowa 

Brock Neb. 

Bronson Iowa 

Brookings S. Dak. 

Brooklyn Wis. 

Brookside " 

Bruce S. Dak. 

Brule Wis. 

Bruno Neb. 

Bryant Iowa 

Brvant Wis. 

Buda 111. 

Buckbee Wis. 

Buckingham Iowa 

Buffalo Gap S. Dak. 

Buncombe Wis. 

Burchard Minn. 

Burkmere S. Dak. 

Burnett Junction Wis. 

Burnside " 

Burr Minn. 

Burt Iowa 

Butterfield Minn. 

Buxton Iowa 

Byron Minn. 

Cadams Neb. 

Calamus Iowa 

Caledonia 111. 

Caledonia Mine Wis. 

Calhoun " 

California Junction Iowa 

Callon Wis. 

Calvary 111. 

Calvary Wis. 

Cambria Minn. 

Camanche Iowa 

Campbell Mich. 

Campbellsport Wis. 

Camp Grove 111. 

Camp Logan " 

Canby Minn. 

Canistota S. Dak. 

Canning " 

Canova " 

Capron 111. 

Carbondale Mich. 

Careyhurst Wyo. 

Carnarvon Iowa 

Carlisle Neb. 

Carlton 111. 

Carney Mich. 

Carnforth Iowa 

Carnforth Crossing " 

Carpentersville 111. 

Carroll Iowa 

Carrollville Wis. 

Carson 

Cartersville Iowa 

Carthage S. Dak. 

Cary 111. 



*Mere "Sidings" and outlying stopping places in the large cities have been eliminated. 

112 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 113 



Casper Wyo. 

Castana Iowa 

Castlewood S. Dak. 

Catholican Springs " 

Cato Wis. 

Cavour S. Dak. 

Cecil Wis. 

Cedar Mich. 

Cedar Wis. 

Cedar Bluffs Neb. 

Cedar Grove Wis. 

Cedar Rapids Iowa 

Center Junction 

Central City Neb. 

Centerville S. Dak. 

Ceresco Neb. 

Ceylon Minn. 

Chadron Neb. 

Champion Mich. 

Charleston Neb. 

Charlotte Iowa 

Chaison Mich. 

Chatfield Minn. 

Chelsea Iowa 

Chemung 111. 

Cherry Valley 

Chester Minn. 

Chester Wis. 

Chicago 111. 

Chicago Highlands " 

Choate Mich. 

Claremont Minn. 

Clarence Iowa 

Clark S. Dak. 

Clarkson Neb. 

Claywood Wis. 

Clearwater Neb. 

Cleeremans Mich. 

Clements Minn. 

Cleveland Wis. 

Cliff House (Devil's Lake). " 

Clinton Iowa 

Clinton Neb, 

Clinton Junction Wis. 

Clintonville 111. 

Clintonville ,Wis. 

Cloverdale 

Clowry Mich. 

Clut ier Iowa 

Clyman Wis. 

Cobb " 

Cobden Minn. 

Cody Neb. 

College Avenue 111. 

Colo Iowa 

Colon Neb. 

Columbia S. Dak. 

Combined Locks Wis. 

Comfrey Minn. 

Commonwealth Wis. 

Conde S. Dak. 

Conover Wis. 

Conrad Iowa 

Cordova Neb. 

Cornlea 

Correct ionville Iowa 

Cortland 111. 

Cottage Grove Wis. 

Council Bluffs Iowa 

County Line Wis. 

Courtland Minn. 

Craigsmere Mich. 

Cranberry Center Wis. 

Crandon S. Dak. 

Crandon Wis. 

Crawford Neb. 

Creighton " 

Crescent Iowa 

Creston 111. 

Creston Neb. 

Crocker. . Iowa 

Crookston Neb. 

Crossman's Wis. 

Crowell Neb. 

Crown Hill S. Dak. 



Crozier's Mill Mich. 

Crystal Falls " 

Crystal Lake 111. 

Cuba " 

Cuba City Wis. 

Cudahy 

Cushing Iowa 

Cuyler 111. 

Daggett Mich. 

Dakota City Iowa 

Dale Neb. 

Danbury Iowa 

Dane Wis. 

Darfur Minn. 

Davey Neb. 

Davenport 

David City " 

Dayton Iowa 

Deadwood S. Dak. 

De Bolt Place Neb. 

Deckers Wis. 

Deep River Iowa 

Deerbrook Wis. 

Deerfield 

De Kalb 111. 

Delaughery Mich. 

Delmar Iowa 

Deloit " 

Dempster S. Dak. 

Denison , Iowa 

De Pere Wis. 

De Smet S. Dak. 

Des Moines. . Iowa 

Desplaines 111. 

Devil's Lake Wis. 

De Witt Iowa 

Diffin Mich. 

Dike , Iowa 

Dillmans Wis. 

Diorite Mich. 

Dishno " 

Dixon 111. 

Dodge Neb. 

Dodge Center Minn. 

Dodgeville Wis. 

Doland S. Dak. 

Dolliver Iowa 

Dotson Minn. 

Doty " 

Dougherty Iowa 

Douglas Wyo. 

Douglass Minn. 

Dousman Wis. 

Dover Minn. 

Dow City Iowa 

Drexel Wis. 

Dryads Mich. 

Dudley Minn. 

Duck Creek Wis. 

Dundas 

Dundee 111. 

Dunham Mich. 

Dunlap Iowa 

Dumont 

Dwight Neb. 

Eagle Grove Iowa 

Eagle Lake Minn. 

Eagle River Wis. 

Earlville 111. 

Early Iowa 

East Elgin 111. 

East Pierre S. Dak. 

East Rapids Iowa 

East Rockford 111. 

Edgar Wis. 

Edison Park 111. 

Eden Wis. 

Edmund 

Eland Junction " 

Elba " 

Elberon Iowa 

Elburn 111. 

Elcho Wis. 



Elderon Wis. 

Eldora Iowa 

Eldora Junction " 

Eldorado Neb. 

Eldorado Wis. 

Eleanor Iowa 

Elgin 111. 

Elgin Minn. 

Elgin Neb. 

Eli " 

Elkton S. Dak. 

Ellsworth Iowa 

Elmhurst 111. 

Elmhurst Wis. 

Elmo " 

Elmore Minn. 

Elm Creek S. Dak. 

Elmwood Wis. 

Elrod S. Dak. 

Elroy Wis. 

Elva 111. 

Embarrass Wis. 

Emmet Neb. 

Escanaba Mich. 

Esmond S. Dak. 

Essig Minn. 

Estelline S. Dak. 

Evan Minn. 

Evans Siding S. Dak. 

Evanston 111. 

Evansville Wis. 

Ewing Neb. 

Exeter " 

Eyota Minn. 

Fairburn Neb. 

Fairfax Iowa 

Fairfax S. Dak. 

Fairmont Minn. 

Farnhamville Iowa 

Faulkton S. Dak. 

Faunus Mich. 

Felch Jet " 

Fellows Wis. 

Fennimore " 

Fenwood " 

Fenton Iowa 

Ferney S. Dak. 

Fetterman Wyo. 

Fisher *' 

Flagg 111. 

Flat Rock Mich. 

Florence Wis. 

Flickville Neb. 

Fond du Lac Wis. 

Footville " 

Ford River Mich. 

Forest Junction Wis. 

Fort Atkinson ' 

Fort Robinson Neb. 

Fort Sheridan 111. 

Foster Neb. 

Foster City Mich. 

Fox Lake Minn. 

Fox Point Wis. 

Fox River " 

Frankfort S. Dak. 

Franklin Grove 111. 

Freeman " 

Freeport " 

Fremont Neb. 

Friday Mich. 

Frost Minn. 

Fulton 111. 

Fulton Junction 

Fumee Mich. 

Gagen Wis. 

Galbraith Iowa 

Galena 111. 

Galesville . .Wis. 

Galloway 

Gait 111. 

Galva _. " 

Garden Prairie 



J 14 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Garvin Minn. 

Garwin Iowa 

Gary S. Dak. 

Geneva Ill- 
Geneva Neb. 

Genoa Junction Wis. 

Gentian Mich. 

Georgia Neb. 

Gettysburg S. Dak. 

Gelled Iowa 

Ghent Minn. 

Gifford Iowa 

Gilbert '' 

Gilberts HI- 

Gile -Wis. 

Gilfillan Minn. 

Gillett Wis. 

Gladbrook Iowa 

Glen Neb. 

Glenbeulah Wis. 

Glencoe -111. 

Glendale Wis. 

Glen Ellyn 111. 

Glen Rock Wyo. 

Glidden Iowa 

Goehner Neb. 

Gogebic Mich. 

Goldfield Iowa 

Goodwin Minn. 

Goose Lake Iowa 

Goose Lake Mich. 

Gordon Neb. 

Gowrie Iowa 

Grand Crossing -Wis. 

Grand Junction Iowa 

Grand Mound 

Grand Rapids Wis. 

Granville Iowa 

Granville Wis. 

Gray Iowa 

Green Bay Wis. 

Green Lake M 

Greenville 

Gresham Neb. 

Gridley Iowa 

Grimms -• Wis. 

Groton »• Dak. 

Guckeen Minn. 

Guernsey Iowa 

Hadar Neb. 

Hahneman 111. 

Halbur Iowa 

Haifa ;; 

Hanford 

Hanlontown 

Hanover Wis. 

Harcourt Iowa 

Hardwood Mich. 

Harlan Iowa 

Harlem 111. 

Harris Mich. 

Harrison Neb. 

Harrison Wis. 

Harrold S. Dak. 

Hartland HI. 

Hartleys Mich. 

Hartwick Iowa 

Harvard Neb. 

Harvard Junction 111. 

Hastings Neb. 

Hatley Wis. 

Havana Minn. 

Havelock Iowa 

Hawarden 

Hayes 111. 

Hay Springs Neb. 

Hazel Mich. 

Hebron 111. 

Heckman Minn. 

Hecla S. Dak. 

Helena Mich. 

Helenville Wis. 

Helps Mich. 

Hematite Wis. 



Henderson Neb. 

Hendricks Minn. 

Henrietta 111. 

Henry S. Dak. 

Herbert 111. 

Hermansville Mich. 

Hermosa S. Dak. 

Herring Iowa 

Hetland S. Dak. 

Highland Park 111. 

Highmore S. Dak. 

High Ridge 111. 

Highwood " 

Hillside Neb. 

Hitchcock S. Dak. 

Holabird " 

Holidays Wis. 

Holstein Iowa 

Honev Creek 

Hooker S. Dak. 

Hooper Neb. 

Hortonville Junction Wis. 

Hot Springs S. Dak. 

Houghton 

Houles Mich. 

Houston Neb. 

Howells 

Hubbard Iowa 

Humphreys Neb. 

Hunting Wis. 

Huntley 111. 

Hurley S. Dak. 

Hurley Wis. 

Huron S. Dak. 

Hylas Mich. 

Ida Grove Iowa 

Imogene Minn. 

Indian Town Mich. 

Inez Wyo. 

Ingalls Mich. 

Inland Neb. 

Inman 

Interior Mich. 

Ipswich Wis. 

Ireton Iowa 

Iron Mountain Mich. 

Iron River 

Ironwood " 

Iroquois S. Dak. 

Iowa Falls Iowa 

Irvine Wyo. 

Irving Iowa 

Irvington ' 

Irvington Neb. 

Irwin Iowa 

Irwin Neb. 

Ishpeming Mich. 

Ivanhoe Minn. 

Ives Wis. 

Jackson Wis. 

Janesville Minn. 

Janesville Wis. 

Jefferson Iowa 

Jefferson Wis. 

Jefferson Junction 

Jeffris 

Jeffris Junction " 

Jewell Junction Iowa 

Johnson's Creek Wis. 

Johnstown Neb. 

Joice Iowa 

Jordan 

Judson Minn. 

Juneau Wis. 

Kampeska S. Dak. 

Kamrar Iowa 

Kasota Minn. 

Kasson " 

Kaukauna Wis. 

Keeline Wyo. 

Kelley Iowa 

Kellner Wis. 



Kelly WU. 

Kempster " 

Kendalls " 

Kenilworth 111. 

Kennard Neb. 

Kenosha Wis. 

Kesley Iowa 

Kew Mich. 

Kewaskum Wis. 

Kiester Minn. 

Kimball Wis. 

Kimberly 

King Mich. 

Kingsley Iowa 

Kingston 111. 

Kirkman Iowa 

Kirkwood Wis. 

Kiron Iowa 

Klevenville Wis. 

Kloman Mich. 

Koepenick Wis. 

Koshkonong 

Kranzburg S. Dak. 

La Crosse Wis. 

Lac du Flambeau 

Ladoga Mich. 

La Fox 111. 

Lake Benton Minn. 

Lake Bluff 111. 

Lake City Iowa 

Lake Elizabeth Wis. 

Lake Forest 111. 

Lake Geneva Wis. 

Lake Mills " 

Lake Mills Iowa 

Lake Preston S. Dak. 

Lake View Iowa 

Lakeside .111. 

Lamberton Minn. 

Lakewood Wis. 

Lakonta Iowa 

La Moille " 

Lancaster Wis. 

Langley 111. 

Laona Wis. 

Larch Mich. 

Larsen Wis. 

Lathrop Mich. 

Lathrop Avenue 111. 

Laurens Iowa 

La Valle Wis. 

Lawn Hill Iowa 

Lawrence 111. 

Lawton Iowa 

Lead S. Dak. 

Leaper Mich. 

Lebanon S. Dak. 

Ledyard Iowa 

Le Grand 

Leiph Neb. 

Lenox Wis. 

Leslie 

Lewiston Minn. 

Liberty Wis. 

Lime Minn. 

Lime Kilns Wis. 

Lime Stone 111. 

Linnberg Iowa 

Lincoln Neb. 

Lindsay 

Lindwerm Wis. 

Linn Grove Iowa 

Linwood Neb. 

Lisbon Io.wa 

Little Chute Wis. 

Little Lake Mich. 

Little Rapids Wis. 

Little Suamico 

Livingston 

Lodi 

Logan Iow-a 

Lohrville 

Lombard Ill- 
London Wis. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 115 



Lone Rock Iowa 

Long Pine Neb. 

Long Point Iowa 

Loretto Neb. 

Loretto Mich. 

Lost Spring Wyo. 

Loveland Iowa 

Lowden 

Low Moor " 

Lucan Minn. 

Ludden N. Dak. 

Lusk Wyo. 

Luverne Iowa 

Lynch Neb. 

Lyons Iowa 

Lytles Wis. 

Madison Wis. 

Magnolia 

Malcolm 

Malone Iowa 

Malone Wis. 

Malta 111. 

Malvern Wis. 

Manchester S. Dak. 

Manitowish Wis. 

Manitowoc " 

Mankato Minn. 

Mankato Junction " 

Manlius 111. 

Manning Iowa 

Mansfield S. Dak. 

Mantorville Minn. 

Manville Wyo. 

Manyaska Minn. 

Maple Park 111. 

Maple Ridge Mich. 

Maple River Junction .. .Iowa 

Mapleton " 

Maquoketa " 

Marathon " 

Marathon City Wis. 

Marengo 111. 

Marenisco Mich. 

Marinette Wis. 

Marion " 

Marna Mich. 

Marshall Minn. 

Marshalltown Iowa 

Marshfield Wis. 

Marshland " 

Martland Neb. 

Mason City Iowa 

Mastodon Mich. 

Maurice Iowa 

Mayfair 111. 

Maywood " 

McFarlands Mich. 

McHenry 111. 

McMillan Wis. 

McNaughton " 

Meadow Grove Neb. 

Mechanicsville Iowa 

Medary Wis. 

Medina " 

Medina Junction " 

Melrose Park 111. 

Melvin S. Dak. 

Menasha Wis. 

Mendota " 

Menominee Mich. 

Mequon Wis. 

Mercer " 

Meriden. Minn. 

Merrimac Wis. 

Merriman Neb. 

Metropolitan Mich. 

Michigamme " 

Midway Wis. 

Milford Minn. 

Millbrig 111. 

Miller S. Dak. 

Millerton Neb. 

Milton Junction Wis. 

Milroy Minn. 



Milwaukee Wis. 

Minneota Minn. 

Minnesota City " 

Minnesota Junction Wis. 

Miranda S. Dak. 

Mission Hill " 

Missouri Valley Iowa 

Modale " 

Moingona " 

Mondamin. " 

Monico Junction Wis. 

Monmouth Iowa 

Monowi Neb. 

Monroe S. Dak. 

Montfort Wis. 

Montour Iowa 

Moorehead " 

Morgan Minn. 

Moritz 8. Dak. 

Morrison 111. 

Morse " 

Morse Bluff Neb. 

Mosel Wis. 

Mosling " 

Mount Horeb " 

Mount Prospect 111. 

Mount Vernon Iowa 

Mountain Wis. 

Moville Iowa 

Mumfords-. Mich. 

Nachusa 111. 

Nadeau Mich. 

Narenta " 

Nashville Iowa 

Necedah Wis. 

Necedah Junction " 

Nekoosa " 

Nekoosa Junction " 

Neenah " 

Negaunee Mich. 

Neligh Neb. 

Nelson 111. 

Nenzel Neb. 

Neshkoro Wis. 

Nevada Iowa 

Newbold Wis. 

New London " 

New London Junction. ..." 

Newman's Grove Neb. 

Newport " 

Newton Wis. 

New Ulm Minn. 

Nickerson Neb. 

Nicollet Minn. 

Niles Center 111. 

Niobrara Neb. 

Node Ranch Wyo. 

Nora. . Neb. 

Norfolk " 

Norfolk Junction " 

Normandy 111. 

Norrie Wis. 

North Aurora 111. 

North Escanaba Mich. 

North Freedom Wis. 

Northfield 111. 

North Greenfield Wis. 

Northville S. Dak. 

Norwalk Wis. 

Norway Iowa 

Norway Mich. 

Norwood Park 111. 

Oak Neb. 

Oak Center Wis. 

Oakdale Neb. 

Oakes N. Dak. 

Oakfield Wis. 

Oak Park 111. 

Oconto Wis. 

Oconto Falls " 

Octavia Neb. 

Odanah Wis. 

Odebolt Iowa 



Odin Minn. 

Oelnchs S. Dak. 

Ogden Iowa 

Okee • Wis. 

Omaha Neb. 

Omaha Heights " 

Onalaska Wis. 

Onawa Iowa 

O'Neill Neb. 

Onslow Iowa 

Ontario " 

Oostburg Wis. 

Oralabor Iowa 

Orange City " 

Ordway. . S. Dak. 

Ore Dock Junction Wis. 

Oregon " 

Orin Junction Wyo. 

Oro Mich. 

Oronoco Minn. 

Orson Iowa 

Osborne Wis. 

Oshawa Minn. 

Oshkosh Wis. 

Osier Mich. 

Otis Iowa 

Owasa " 

Owatonna Minn. 

Palatine III. 

Panola Mich. 

Parker S. Dak. 

Parkersburg Iowa 

Park Ridge 111. 

Parrish Wis. 

Partridge Mich. 

Paulding " 

Pauliina Iowa 

Pecatonica 111. 

Peebles Wis. 

Pelican " 

Pence " 

Pensaukee " 

Pentoga Mich. 

Peoria 111. 

Perkins Mich. 

Perronville " 

Peshtigo Wis. 

Petersburg Neb. 

Peterson Iowa 

Petersville " 

Peterson's Mich. 

Piedmont S. Dak. 

Pierce Neb. 

Pierre S. Dak. 

Pierson Iowa 

Pilger Neb. 

Pine Creek Wis. 

Pine Grove " 

Pine Island Minn. 

Pine Ridge Mich. 

Pisgah Iowa 

Plains Mich. 

Plainview Minn. 

Plainview Neb. 

Planks Minn. 

Platteville Wis. 

Platte River Neb. 

Pleasant Prairie Wis. 

Plum Creek Iowa 

Plymouth Wis. 

Polk City Iowa 

Poplar Grove 111. 

Port Edwards . . Wis. 

Porter Minn. 

Portland S. Dak. 

Port Washington Wis. 

Potato River Junction. ..." 

Powell " 

Powers Mich. 

Preparation Iowa 

Preston Wis. 

Princeton " 

Quarry Iowa 

Quinnesec Mich. 



116 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Racine Wis. 

Racine Junction " 

Radcliffe Iowa 

Radford Mich. 

Radnor 111. 

Ralston Iowa 

Ramsey Mich. 

Randall Iowa 

Rapid City S. Dak. 

Ravenswood 111. 

Ravinia ' 

Rawhide Neb. 

Raymond S. Dak. 

Redfield " 

Red Granite Wis. 

Redwood Falls Minn. 

Reedsburg Wis. 

Reedville " 

Ree Heights S. Dak. 

Renwick Iowa 

Republic Mich. 

Revere. Minn. 

Rewey Wis. 

Rhinelander " 

Rhodes " 

Richmond 111. 

Ricketts Iowa 

Ridgefield Wis. 

Ridgeland 111. 

Ridgeway Wis. 

Ridott 111. 

Riley's Wis. 

Ringle " 

Ringwood 111. 

Ringsted Iowa 

Ripon Wis. 

River Forest 111. 

River Sioux Iowa 

Robbins Mich. 

Rochelle 111. 

Rock Neb. 

Rochester Minn. 

Rockfield Wis. 

Rockford 111. 

Rockham S. Dak. 

Rock Island Junction 111. 

Rockland Wis. 

Rolfe Iowa 

Rollo 111. 

Roscoe " 

Rose Hill " 

Rosendale Wis. 

Rosholt " 

Ross Iowa 

Rosseau S. Dak. 

Ross Minn. 

Roth's Spur Wis. 

Round Grove 111. 

Rowena Minn. 

Roxby Neb. 

Rubens Iowa 

Ruby Basin S. Dak. 

Rudolph " 

Rummeles Wis. 

Rushville Neb. 

Rutland Iowa 

Sac City Iowa 

St. Charles 111. 

St. Charles Minn. 

St. Cloud Wis. 

St. Francis " 

St. Lawrence S. Dak. 

St. Marie Wis. 

St. Mary's S. Dak. 

St. Onge " 

St. Peter Minn 

St. Rose Wis. 

Salem S. Dak. 

Salem Wis. 

Salix Iowa 

.Sanborn Minn. 

Sandhurst Mich. 

Sand Rock Wis. 

Sands.. . Mich. 



Secora Iowa 

Sargent's Bluffs " 

Satuit Wis. 

Saunders Mich. 

Sawyer Neb. 

Saxon Wis. 

Saylor Iowa 

Schaller " 

Schleswig " 

Scott Wis. 

Scranton Iowa 

Scarville " 

Scribner Neb. 

Seaforth Minn. 

Secora Iowa 

Seneca S. Dak. 

Seven Mile Creek Wis. 

Seward Neb. 

Shabbona Grove 111. 

Shaffer Mich. 

Sharon Wis. 

Shawano " 

Shawnee Wyo. 

Sherlocks Mich. 

Sheboygan Wis. 

Sheboygan Falls " 

Sheldahl Iowa 

Shickley Neb. 

Shopiere Wis. 

Siemens Mich. 

Silica Wis. 

Silver Springs " 

Sioux City Iowa 

Sioux Rapids " 

Sioux Valley Junction. S. Dak. 

Slater Iowa 

Sleepy Eye Minn. 

Sloan Iowa 

Smith's Mill Minn. 

Smithwick S. Dak. 

Snells Wis. 

Snyder Neb. 

Soldier Iowa 

Soudan Neb. 

South Centralia Wis. 

South Omaha Neb. 

Spalding Mich. 

Sparta Wis. 

Speer 111. 

Spencer S. Dak. 

Split Rock Wis. 

Spread Eagle " 

Springfield Minn. 

Spring Lake W T is. 

Spring Valley 111. 

Stafford Neb. 

Stager Mich. 

Stambaugh " 

Stanhope Iowa 

Stanton Neb. 

Stanwood Iowa 

Stark " 

State Centre " 

State Hospital Wis. 

State Line " 

State Line Iowa 

Stephenson Mich. 

Sterling 111. 

Stiles Junction Wis. 

Stitzer " 

Stoekham Neb. 

Stockton Minn. 

Story Iowa 

Stout " 

Stratford " 

Stratford Wis. 

Strawbridge " 

Strouds Wvo. 

Stuart Neb. 

Sturgeon Mich. 

Sturgis S. Dak. 

Sugar Bush Wis. 

Sullivan " 

Sumac Mich. 

Summit Wis. 



Summit Lake Wis. 

Superior Neb. 

Suring Wis. 

Surprise Neb. 

Sutherland Iowa 

Swanzy Mich. 

Swedenburg Neb. 

Sycamore 111. 

Syene Wis. 

Talbot Mich. 

Tama Iowa 

Tamarack Mich. 

Taunton Minn. 

Taylors Mich. 

Terra Cotta 111. 

Terry S. Dak. 

Thatcher Neb. 

Thayer " 

Thayer Mich. 

Thor Iowa 

Thrall " 

Three Lakes Wis. 

Tigerton " 

Tilden Neb. 

Tilford S. Dak. 

Tilton Iowa 

Tioga " 

Tipton " 

Toledo " 

Tomahawk Lake Wis. 

Town Line " 

Tracy Minn. 

Traer Iowa 

Traverse Minn. 

Trempealeau Wis. 

Triumph 111. 

Triumph Minn. 

Tromblv Mich. 

Troy Grove 111. 

Turin Iowa 

Turton S. Dak. 

Twin Lakes Wis. 

Two Rivers " 

Tyler . .Minn. 

Ulao Wis. 

Underhill 

Union 111. 

Union Center Wis. 

Union Grove 111. 

Union Pacific Trans Iowa 

Urban S. Dak. 

Ute Iowa 

Utica Minn. 

Vail Iowa 

Valentine Neb. 

Van Buskirk Wis. 

Vandvne 

Van Petten 111. 

Van Tassell Wyo. 

Vega Mich. 

Verdel Neb. 

Verdi Minn. 

Verdigre Neb. 

Verdon S. Dak. 

Verona Wis. 

Vesper 

Vesta Minn. 

Vilas S. Dak. 

Viola Minn. 

Volga S. Dak. 

Volin S. Dak. 

Vulcan Mich. 

Voorhies Iowa 

Wabasso Minn. 

Wabeno Wis. 

Wabik Mich. 

Wahoo Neb. 

Wakefield Mich. 

Wakonda S. Dak. 

Wald Iowa 

Wales Wis. 



HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 117 



Wallace Mich. 

Wall Lake Iowa 

Walnut Grove Minn. 

Wanda 

Waseca 

Washington Neb. 

Watersmeet Mich. 

Watertown S. Dak. 

Watertown Wis. 

Watkins Iowa 

Waucedah Mich. 

Waukegan 111. 

Waukesha Wis. 

W*unakee 

Wausau 

Wautoma 

Wayburn Minn. 

Wayne 111. 

Wavside Neb. 

Weber 111. 

Webster City Iowa 

Weedens Wis. 

Welcome Minn. 

Wellington Mich. 

Werley Wis. 

Wessington S. Dak. 

West Bend Wis. 

West Chicago 111. 

West Elgin " 



West End Neb. 

West Gladstone Mich. 

West Greenville Wis. 

West Lawn Neb. 

West Point Neb. 

West Rapids Iowa 

West Salem Wis. 

West Side Iowa 

What Cheer " 

Wheatland " 

Wheaton 111. 

Wheelerwood Iowa 

Whit comb Wis. 

White Fish Bay " 

Whitewood S. Dak. 

Whiting Iowa 

Whitney Mich. 

Whitney Neb. 

Whitson Junction Wis. 

Whitten Iowa 

Wilcox Wis. 

Wild Rose " 

Williams Bay " 

Wilmette 111. 

Wilson Mich. 

Wilton Wis. 

Winde Mich. 

Winfield Iowa 

Winnebago 111. 



Winnetka III. 

Winnetoon Neb* 

Winona Minn. 

Winthrop Harbor III. 

Wisner Neb. 

Wittenburg Wis. 

Wolf River Junction " 

Wolsey S. Dak. 

Wonewoc Wis. 

Woodbine Iowa 

Woodhull Wis. 

Wood Lake Neb. 

Woodman Wis. 

Woodruff " 

Woodstock 111. 

Woodworth Wis. 

Woolstock Iowa 

Wright " 

Wrightstown Wis. 

Yankton S. Dak. 

York Neb. 

Zaneta Iowa 

Zell S. Dak. 

Zion City 111. 

Zumbrota Minn. 



CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS & OMAHA RAILWAY 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STATIONS 



Adrian Minn. 

Allouez Wis. 

Alton Iowa 

Altoona Wis. 

Amboy Minn. 

Angus Wis. 

Anson 

Ash Creek Minn. 

Ashland Wis. 

Ashland Junction " 

Ashton Iowa 

Augusta Wis. 

Avoca Minn. 

Baldwin Wis. 

Bancroft Neb. 

Barden Minn. 

Barksdale Wis. 

Barronett 

Bayfield ' 

Beaver Creek Minn. 

Beebe Wis. 

Beldenville 

Belle Plaine Minn. 

Bennett Wis. 

Benoit 

Bibon " 

Bigelow Minn. 

Bingham Lake " 

Birchwood Wis. 

Black River Falls " 

Blair Neb. 

Blakeley Minn. 

Bloomer Wis. 

Bloomfield Neb. 

Blue Earth Minn. 

Bluff " 

Boardman Wis. 

Bradley Minn. 

Brandon S. Dak. 

Brewster Minn. 

Brill Wis. 

Brunet " 

Burkhardt " 

Butterfield Minn. 



Cable Wis. 

Calhoun Neb. 

Cameron Wis. 

Camp Douglas " 

Carnes Iowa 

Caroline Minn. 

Carroll Neb. 

Cedarhurst Wis. 

Chandler " 

Chapman " 

Chetek " 

Chili " 

Chippewa Falls " 

Clarks " 

Clayton " 

Clear Lake " 

Cliff Minn. 

Cobban Wis. 

Coburn Neb. 

Coffman " 

Coleridge " 

Columbia Wis. 

Comfort " 

Comstock " 

Concord Neb. 

Cornell Wis. 

Couderay " 

County Line " 

Craig Neb. 

Cumberland Wis. 

Currie Minn. 

Dakota City Neb. 

Dauby Wis. 

Deer Park " 

Delft .Minn. 

De Soto Neb. 

Donald Wis. 

Doon Iowa 

Dovray Minn. 

Drummond Wis. 

Duluth Minn. 

Dundee " 



Eagle 

Eagle Point. 



.Wis. 



Eastlake Minn. 

East St. Paul " 

Eau Claire Wis. 

Ebbe " 

Eileen " 

Eleva " 

Elk Mound " 

Ellis S. Dak. 

Ellsworth Wis. 

Elmore Minn. 

Elmwood , .Wis. 

Elroy " 

Emerald " 

Emerson Neb. 

Fairchild Wis. 

Fairmont Minn. 

Fall Creek Wis. 

Farmer S. Dak. 

Fleming Wis. 

Florence Neb. 

Fulton S. Dak. 

Garden City Minn. 

Glover Wis. 

Gordon " 

Granite Lake " 

Granton " 

Gray Minn. 

Grogan " 

Hadley Wis. 

Hallie Wis. 

Hammond " 

Hannibal " 

Hansen " 

Hartford S. Dak. 

Hartington Neb. 

Hatch Wis. 

Haugen " 

Hawthorne " 

Hay ward " 

Hazel Park Minn. 

Henderson " 



118 HISTORY OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Herman Neb. 

Heron Lake Minn. 

Hersey Wis. 

Hines 

Hinton Iowa 

Holcombe Wis. 

Home Park 

Hope Neb. 

Hoskins 

Hosper Iowa 

Houghton Wis. 

Hubbard Neb. 

Hudson Wis. 

Humbird 

Humboldt S. Dak. 

Hustler ■ Wis. 

Iceland Minn. 

Itasca Wis. 

Jackson Neb. 

James Iowa 

Jeffers Minn. 

Jim Falls Wis. 

Jordan Minn. 

Kasota Minn. 

Kempton Wis. 

Kipling " 

Knapp 

Koll " 

Kurth *' 

Lake Crystal Minn. 

Lake Elmo " 

Lakeland Junction 

Lakeside Wis. 

Lake Wilson Minn. 

Lakewood Iowa 

Lampson Wis. 

Laurel Neb. 

Lawrence Minn. 

Le Mars Iowa 

Leonards Wis. 

Le Sueur Minn. 

Lewisville 

Lime Creek " 

Linderman Wis. 

Luverne Minn. 

Lyons Neb. 

Madelia Minn. 

Magnet Neb. 

Magnolia Minn. 

Mankato 

Marshfield Wis. 

Mason " 

Mendota Minn. 

Menomonie Wis. 

Menomonie Junction 

Merriam Minn. 

Merrill Iowa 

Merrillan Wis. 

Midvale Minn. 

Millston Wis. 

Mines 

Minneapolis Minn. 

Minneopa 

Minnesota Transfer " 

Minong Wis. 



Mitchell S. Dak. 

Mondovi Wis. 

Montrose S. Dak. 

Mountain Lake Minn. 

Nacora Neb. 

Narrows Wis. 

Necedah Junction " 

Neillsville " 

Nettleton Avenue " 

New Auburn ' 

Newcastle Neb. 

New Richmond Wis. 

Nicols Minn. 

Norfolk Neb. 

Norma Wis. 

Northrop Minn. 

North Wisconsin Jet Wis. 

Oakdale Minn. 

Oakland Neb. 

Omaha " 

Org Minn. 

Osseo Wis. 

Ottawa Minn. 

Pender Neb. 

Perley Wis. 

Peterson " 

Phipps " 

Pike's Quarry " 

Pipestone Minn. 

Ponca Neb. 

Prairie Junction Minn. 

Pratt Wis. 

Prescott Road " 

Price " 

Radisson ' 

Ranch Spur Neb. 

Randolph ' 

Rice Lake Wis. 

Richardson " 

Ritter Iowa 

River Falls Wis. 

Riverside. - S. Dak. 

Roberts Wis. 

Rockmont " 

Rock Rapids Iowa 

Rosedale Wis. 

Rushmore Minn. 

Rusk Wis. 

St. James Minn. 

St. Paul " 

St. Peter " 

Salem S. Dak. 

Salmo Wis. 

Sarona 

Sauntry " 

Savage Minn. 

Seney Iowa 

Severance . .Wis. 

Shakopee Minn. 

Sheldon Iowa 

Shell Lake Wis. 

Sheppard 

Sholes Neb. 

Siblev Iowa 

Sillhawn Wis. 

Sioux 



Sioux City Iowa 

Sioux Falls. S. Dak. 

Slay ton Minn. 

Solon Springs Wis. 

South Omaha Neb. 

South Range Wis. 

South St. Paul Minn. 

South Sioux City Neb. 

South Stillwater Minn. 

Spencer S. Dak. 

Spooner Wis. 

Spring Brook " 

Spring Valley " 

Stanton " 

Stillwater Minn. 

Stillwater Junction " 

Stinnett Wis. 

Stone Minn. 

Storden ' 

Stowell Wis. 

Strum ' 

Superior " 

Superior Junction " 

Sweden " 

Sydney " 

Teegarden Wis. 

Tekamah Neb. 

Thurston 

Tramway Wis. 

Trent Minn. 

Trow Wis. 

Truax 

Truman. Minn. 

Tunnel Wis. 

Turtle Lake " 

Tuscobia " 

Twin City Stock Yards.. Minn. 
Tyson Neb. 

Valley Junction Wis. 

Valley Springs S. Dak. 

Vernon Center Minn. 

Vista Neb. 

Wakefield Neb. 

Warner Minn. 

Warren Wis. 

Wascott 

Washburn ' 

Wausa Neb. 

Wayne 

Wedges Creek Wis. 

Westbrook Minn. 

Weston Wis. 

Wilder Minn. 

Wildwood Wis. 

Wilson " 

Windom Minn. 

Winnebago City 

Winside Neb. 

Winter Wis. 

Woodstock Minn. 

Woodville Wis. 

Worthington Minn. 

Wright Wis. 

Yara Minn. 

Yarnell Wis. 

Yolo " 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Adams, A. W 17 

Adoption of name of road 33 

Aishton, R. H 89, 93 

Allison, W. B 29 

Ames, Oakes 26 

Ames, Oliver, 2d 88, 91 

Anthonv, Elliott 31 

Ashley, O. D 37 

Bald Mountain and Ruby Basin 32 

Baldwin, S. C .' 42 

Baldwin, M. W. ...... . 12 

Baldwin Locomotive Works 21 

Barger, Samuel F 88, 91 

Bartholomew, G. M 35 

Baraboo Air Line 58 

Barney, D. X., & Co 41 

Beginning of Chicago & North-Western Railway 37 

Bell, G. W .' 67 

Bertram, John 26 

Blair, John 1 28. 29 

Blair bridge 30 

Blodgett, Judge H. W 43 

Block Xo 1 in Chicago 8,14 

Blunt, John E 8, 89, 94 

Bodfish, C. X 26 

Bonesteel line built S3 

Booth, W. A 35 

Boodv, H. H 35 

Bowers, L. W 89, 94 

Branch roads 13 

Bridge over Platte River 32 

Brigham, E. D 94 

Brown, W. H 22, 34 

Bronson, Arthur 8 

Buffalo in Dakota 59 

Buildings on shop grounds 84 

Burke, J. M 44, 48 

Burt, H. G 67 

Butler, Charles 8, 36, 89 

Butler, Pierce 67 

Cairns, C. A 94 

Cantillon, W. D 93 

Carter, E. C 94 

Carroll, L. S. 94 

Capital stock increased 83 

Cedar Rapids & Missouri River Railroad 21, 27 

Charters, Underlying 101 , 110 

Chicago fire, losses 48 

Chicago to Galena, miles 10 

Chicago & St. Charles Air Line 16 

Chicago, St. Charles & Mississippi Air Line 16 

Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad 25, 42 

Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad 17, 20, 22, 26, 69 

Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac road 36 

119 



120 INDEX 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha — page 

Directors and officers 67 

Divisions of 6, 7, 68 

History of 50-5S 

Mileage 68 

Purchase of stock 66 

Chicago & Tomah Railroad 63 

Chicago & Dakota Railway 63 

Chicago & North-Western Railway — 

Beginning of 37 

Divisions 3, 4, 6 

First board of directors 37 

First board of directors after consolidation 42 

Last board of directors before consolidation 44 

Classification of directors 46, 48 

Cleveland, J. F 94 

Coal, bituminous, tried 16 

Cobb, S. B 34 

Commissioners by charter 7 

Consolidated road constituents 33 

Connection with Union Pacific 45 

Consolidation, reasons for 33 

Cost of rails 21 

Courtney, A. C 37 

Courtright, M 48 

Crane, Zenas • 88, 92 

Crandon, F. P 95 

Creighton branch 32 

Crocker, L. B 26 

Dakota Central Railway 63 

Darling, M. C 35, 37 

Davidson, G. M 67, 89, 94 

Davis, T. T 26 

Depew, Chauncey M 67, 88, 91 

Depots in Chicago 23-25 

Des Moines & Minneapolis Railroad 63 

Divisions of Chicago & North-Western Railway 3-4-6 

Dixon & Iowa Central route 15 

Downs, A. S 42 

Dows, David 48 

Dubuque & Minnesota 15 

Dulman, A. G 46, 48 

Dunlap, Geo. L 35, 41 

Earliest charter 3 

Earnings in 1877 and 1882 66 

Ebbert, John 12 

Elevation of Wells Street in Chicago 17 

Elgin & State Line 21 , 47 

Elrov route 50 

Ely,' J. F 2S 

Emerson , L. A 65 

Employes pensioned SO, 82 

Equipment, engine and cars 88 

Escanaba & Lake Superior Railroad 66 

Excursion train to Dakota 58 

Extinction of Galena Company 32 

Fargo, Jas. C ' 88, 91 

Fargo, W. G 41 

Ferrv, W. H 34 

Field, Marshall 88, 92 

Fire in Chicago, falsely reported 58 

Fish, J. D 35 

Flower, R. P 48, 91 



INDEX 121 

PAGE 

Fond du Lac road sold at auction 37 

Foster, J. H 34 

Fox River Valley road 15, 21 

Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad 31 

Frick, H. C 88, 92 

Frink & Walker 9 

Frost & Granger 84 

Fuel and its cost 14 

Galena Road — 

Cost to June. 1S56 17 

Dates of opening. 18 

Depots in Chicago 23 

First assistant general superintendent of Galena Division 21 

First contract for building 10 

First directory 9 

First general freight agent 17 

First general ticket agent 17 

First general superintendent 21 

First master mechanic 21 

First shops 13 

Fuel 22 

Last directory before consolidation 34 

Mileage at consolidation 34 

Presidents 34 

Stock books opened 9 

Survey began 9 

To build east of Chicago 10 

Value of Galena property 23 

Galena Jefjersonian quoted 16 

Galena it Southern Wisconsin Railway 63 

Galesville & Mississippi Railroad 66 

Gardner, W. A. . . . 89, 93 

General office building. Lake street and Fifth avenue 70 

General office building, on Jackson and Franklin streets 84 

General office buildings, on Kinzie and Market streets 59 

Gogebic Iron Ore Range 74 

Granger legislation. 59, 71 

Great consolidation 33 

Green Bay Transit Company 39 

Gross earnings in twenty-first year 63 

Gumee, W. S ' 42 

Hatch House 24 

Hall, P. E 32 

Holland directors 46 

Howe, James H 48, 91, 93 

Holland investors in company 45 

Howe, Isaac B 26 

Howe, Francis 9 

Howe. SO 67, 93 

Hoyt, Jesse 41 

Holbrook. Lowell ' 35 

Hope, H. C 67 

Hughitt, Marvin 48, 49, 62, 67, 88, 91, 92, 93, 95 

Hughitt, M., Jr 89, 94 

Humbird, J. A 67 

Illinois Central Railroad 15 

Illinois Parallel Railroad 42 

Illinois & Wisconsin Railroad 35 

Its directors 35 

Iowa Land Company 26 

Iowa Railroad Land Company 29 

Iowa Central Air Line Company 27, 46 



122 INDEX 

PAGE 

Iowa Midland Railroad 47 

Jay Cook & Co. failure , 58 

Johnson, A. W 26 

Johnson, C. W 67 

Johnson, E H 94 

Keep, Henry 45, 90, 92 

Keep, Albert 49, 67, 88, 91, 92 

Kenosha & Rockford Railroad 21, 39 

Kenosha & Beloit Railroad 38 

Kenosha & Mississippi River Railroad 38 

Kimball, David P 67, 88, 91 

Kirkman, M. M 89, 92 

Knapp, Charles H 94 

Kniskem, W . B 89, 94 

La Crosse, Trempealeau & Prescott Railroad 41, 58 

Its sale by Barney & Co 41 

Lake Forwarding Company 39 

Lake Geneva reached by railroad 47 

Lanier, J. T. D 37 

Land-grant scandal in Wisconsin 37 

Last directory of Chicago & North-Western before consolidation 34 

Larrabee, W. M 34 

Lee, G. P " 35, 93 

List of Stations 112-118 

Little Bay de Noquet 39 

Locomotives, names and description 19. 20 

Lunt, Orrington 22, 34 

Lynde, S. A 94 

Madison & Beloit Railroad 35 

Maple River Railroad 31, 61 

McCormick, Cyrus H 88, 92 

McCullough, H. R 89, 92, 94 

Menominee River Railroad 61 

Mevers, Austin 26 

Mitchell, Alex 42 

Michigan Central Railroad 10 

Milwaukee & Chicago Railroad 25, 42 

Milwaukee & North- Western Railway 49 

Minnesota Valley Railway 62 

Milwaukee & Madison Railway 63 

Mileage in 1877 and 1882 66 

Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railway — 

History 74 

Purchase of 73 

Morrison, G. S 31 

Morgan, Richard P 8-10 

Nash, C. P 67 

Nebraska Air Line Railroad 30 

Newberry, Walter S 21 

Newman, W. H 92 

North- Western Union 5S-62 

Northern Pacific Railroad 45 

North-Western System 3 

North- Western Railroad, first mention 10 

Ogden, W. B 8, 9, 89, 92 

Omaha stock yards line 32 

Osborn, E. E 89, 92 

Panic of 1837 8 

1857 17, 37 

1S73 61 

1893 76 

Paint plant 85 

Making 85 



INDEX 123 

PAGE 

Parker, C. H 35 

Passenger depot in Chicago 63 

Patrick, B. F 42 

Pease, J. J. R 35 

Pearce, H. M. 67 

Pension system and board 80, 83 

Perkins, Jenks D jo 14 

Peninsula Railroad 40 

Pioneer, the locomotive 11, 12 

Platte River bridge 30 

Pollvs, T. A 67 

Pope, W. S. 34 

Potter law in Wisconsin 61 

Porter, H. H 20, 91, 93 

Pritehard, A. L 35 

Publishing list of stockholders 21 

Pullman contract 32 

Quayle, Robert 94 

Racine & Mississippi Railroad 21 

Rail connection — 

At Bass Creek, Wis 20 

From Milwaukee 20 

Railway mail cars 32 

Raymond, B. W 8, 9, 34 

Redfield J. B 44, 89, 91, 93, 'l01 

Reduction of employes ; 17 

Rhinelander, F. W 74 

Road opened to Freeport 15 

Roads west of Mississippi River 26 

Road after consolidation 44 

Robertson,- T. D. ' ' 34 

Robinson, L. A 67 

Rochester & North-Western Railway 62 

Rock River Valley Railroad 36 

Rockford convention 8 

Rogers, E. K 34 

Ruby Basin and Bald Mountain 32 

Sale by State, of Winona & St. Peter Railroad 41 

Sale of Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad 37 

Sanborn, S 93 

Scandal in Wisconsin 37 

Scott, W. L ^48 

Scribncr Branch 32 

Seyton, C. S ^35 

Seddon, Isaac 67 

Sholes, Lyman 67 

Sheboygan & Fond du Lac Railroad, History of 63 

Skinner, Mark 34 

Side tracks 6 

Simmons, Chas. E 62, 94 

Sioux City & Pacific Railway 28, 29 

Purchased ' 82 

Smith, Milo 26 28 

Smith, Theophilus W 8 

Smith, Henry 37 

Smith, Angus 4] 

Smith, P. H '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 35 

Smith, Bvron L 88 91 

Snow in winter of 1880-1 881 .'65 

Stanwood, H. P 48, 94 

Steamers on Green Bay, names of 39 

Stillman, James 88, 92 

St. Charles road 9 



124 INDEX 

• PAGE 

Strap rail railroad — 

Abandoned 14 

Why used 11, 12 

Cost of 1 1 

Description „ 11 

Strickland, S. G 67 

Summing up 85 

Sykes, M. L „ 43. 48, 80, 83, 90, 92, 93 

Talcott, E. B 21 34 

Teasdale, T. W : .'67 

Ten Have Frzn, J. L 46, 48, 90 

Telegraph line, the first erected 16 

Thayer, G. H 94 

Thayer, J. 64, 65 

Thrall, W. A 17. 94 

Tilden, Samuel J 37^ 44 

Townsend & Mather 8,9 

Track elevation in Chicago ". .77, 87 

In Milwaukee 87 

- Track depression in Milwaukee 87 

Tracy, J. F 48 

Transit railroad incorporated 40 

Trenholm, A. W 67 

Turner (the station) 18 

Turnpike in place of railroad 8 

Turner, John B 8, 9 

•Twombly, H. McK 88. 91 

Union Pacific Railroad finished 46 

Vanderbilt, W. K 67, 88 91 

Vanderbilt, F. W 67, 88', 91 

Van Nortwick, John. 11, 12 

Viaducts in Chicago 84 

War of Rebellion, effect on road. . , 22 

Wadswortb , Julien 42 

Wadsworth, E. S 42 

Walker, W. W 28 

Watson, Geo 34 

Wentworth, John 34 

West Wisconsin Railway 49 

Weare, John 28 

Wheaton, Warren L 11 

Wheeler, G. M 21, 22 

Whitman, J. M 67, 89, 92, 93 

Williams, Horace 26, 91 

Wilson Thos 67 

Williams, R H 93 

Williams, Dr. E. H 21, 34 

Winona & St Peter Railroad 40 

Winslow, Albert 37 

Winslow, Jas 37 

Winter of 1880-1881 65 

Wood. J. A „ 35 

Wood E. F 67 

Woodburv, G. M 28 

Woodman, E. E 58, 67 

Work, Frank 88, 91, 92 

Wyoming Central 32, 70 75, 108 

Young, J. R 35 



124 INDEX 

PAGE 

Strap rail railroad — 

Abandoned 14 

Why used 11, 12 

Cost of 1 1 

Description „ 11 

Strickland, S. G 67 

Summing up „ 85 

Sykes, M. L „ 43. 48, 80, 83, 90, 92, 93 

Talcott, E. B 21 34 

Teasdale, T. W -. .'67 

Ten Have Frzn, J. L 46, 48, 90 

Telegraph line, the first erected 16 

Thayer, G. H 94 

Thaver, J. 64, 65 

Thrall, W. A 17. 94 

Tilden, Samuel J 37^ 44 

Townsend & Mather 8, 9 

Track elevation in Chicago '. . 77, 87 

In Milwaukee 87 

- Track depression in Milwaukee 87 

Tracy, J. F 48 

Transit railroad incorporated 40 

Trenholm, A. W 67 

Turner (the station) 18 

Turnpike in place of railroad 8 

Turner, John B 8,9 

•Twomblv, H. McK 88, 91 

Union Pacific Railroad finished 46 

Vanderbilt, W. K 67, 88 91 

Vanderbilt, F. W 67, 88, 91 

Van Nortwick, John. 11, 12 

Viaducts in Chicago 84 

War of Rebellion, effect on road. . , 22 

Wadsworth , Julien 42 

Wadsworth, E. S 42 

Walker, W. W 28 

Watson, Geo 34 

Wentworth, John 34 

West Wisconsin Railway 49 

Weare, John 28 

Wheaton, Warren L , 11 

Wheeler, G. M 21, 22 

Whitman, J. M 67, 89, 92, 93 

Williams, Horace 26, 91 

Wilson Thos 67 

Williams, R H 93 

Williams, Dr. E. H 21, 34 

Winona & St Peter Railroad 40 

Winslow, Albert 37 

Winslow, Jas 37 

Winter of 1880-1881 65 

Wood, J. A 35 

Wood E. F 67 

Woodbury, G. M 28 

Woodman, E. E 58, 67 

Work, Frank 88, 91, 92 

Wyoming Central 32, 70 75, 108 

Young, J. R 35 



MAP OF THE CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN SYSTEM 

DECEMBER 31, 1904